LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

Checkerboard Band

Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Detective Louis A. Abbott Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Feb 1944
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
762
Incident Date:
14 Feb 1947
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
03 Mar 1947
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - South Wabash
Date of Birth:
07 May 1908
Served:
3 years, 0 months, 23 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Laurel Hill Cemetery - Erie, Pennsylvania
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 45
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 12W: 11

Incident Details:

Detective Louis A. Abbott, Star #762, aged 38 years, was a 3 year, 0 month, 23 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - South Wabash.

On February 14, 1947, Detective Abbott was investigating a series of robberies in the 5th and 27th Districts with Detectives Louis Cella and Barney Halperin. All three of the Detectives were able to take two of the men involved into custody. Another detail of officers stationed at 5244 South Dearborn Street, the apartment of a third suspect William McKinley, 33, learned of his whereabouts. The officers on the detail nabbed a teenager, John Forsythe, who related that McKinley had sent him there to pick up clothing. Forsythe said that he had last seen McKinley at the corner of 43rd Street and St. Lawrence Avenue. It was certain that McKinley would be found and arrested.

At 11:10 p.m., Detectives Abbott, Cella and Halperin went to the location in search of McKinley but were unable to find him. Detectives Cella and Halperin decided to give up the hunt for that evening at 11:00 p.m. and returned to the station. Detective Abbott decided to continue looking for McKinley. At 11:10 p.m., Detective Abbott located McKinley at 53rd and State Streets. As Abbott attempted to question McKinley the ex-convict drew a gun and shot the detective. Abbott was struck in his liver and despite being critically wounded Abbott drove himself to Provident Hospital.

Approximately 15 minutes after Detectives Cella and Halperin returned to the station they received a report that Detective Abbott was being treated for a gunshot wound at Provident Hospital. The identity of Abbotts shooter was discovered and a massive manhunt was begun for McKinley. The manhunt spread across the city and on February 15, 1947, at 3:30 a.m., McKinley was located by officers and a gunfight ensued. McKinley was shot in the head and chest multiple times dying on scene. Detective Abbott clung to life for three weeks in the hospital before succumbing to his injuries 20 days later on March 3, 1947, outliving his killer.

Detective Abbott was described by the Chief of the Uniformed Force, Raymond Crane, as "one of the finest detectives I know," according to the Chicago Times. Crane had claimed that Abbott had made ten times more burglary arrests than any other man in the Department. Captain Jerome Looney of the Wabash Avenue Station said Abbott often worked 24 hours straight while on a case. Abbott was called one of the bravest men in the police department by his coworkers and had become known for his fearlessness in hunting south side law breakers. He was remembered by others as a "lone wolf" who dedicated many of his off duty hours to hunting criminals. He was also the partner of Detective Bernard L. Halperin for many years, Halperin would also be slain in the line of duty on December 20, 1957.

Tragically, Detective Barney Halperin would also be killed in the line of duty just over 10 years after this incident on December 20, 1957.

Detective Abbott was laid to rest in Laurel Hill Cemetery, 3822 Ridge Avenue, Erie Pennsylvania.

Detective Louis A. Abbott, born May 7, 1908, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 9, 1944. He earned 3 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $120.00. Prior to becoming a Chicago Policeman Abbott was a policeman in Breedsville, Michigan.

Detective Abbott was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Dagny; children: Joanne and Louis, Jr.; parents: Clarence and Mable and sister, Mrs. Evelyn Forsyth.

In June 1962, the police department honored Detective Abbott's memory by naming the brand new M-1 police boat in the Department's Marine Unit after him.

Probationary Patrolman Thomas J. Adams Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Feb 1973
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2210
Incident Date:
26 Aug 1973
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
31
End of Watch:
26 Aug 1973
Unit of Assignment:
11th District - Fillmore
Date of Birth:
25 Nov 1941
Served:
6 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Washington Memorial Cemetery - Homewood, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 33-E: 6

Incident Details:

Probationary Patrolman Thomas J. Adams, Jr., Star #2210, aged 31 years, was a 6 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to Unit 044 - Recruit Training, detailed to the 11th District - Fillmore.

On August 26, 1973, Marquette District officers responded to a call of shots fired in the 3300 block of west Douglas Boulevard. Responding officers canvassed the area and during the canvass the came to 3339 West Douglas Boulevard and discovered a body on the porch of the home. A .38 caliber revolver was found at the scene and was later identified as the murder weapon. Further investigation revealed that the body was that of Officer Adams. Adams' gun, wallet and car keys were missing. Detectives traced the weapon they found to Darryl R. "Doc" Smith. According to Adams' brother, Joe, Thomas had joined the police department because of his concern over street crime in the city and had recently asked for a transfer because he felt that he was not able to fulfill his obligations as a policeman at his current post. Joe also stated that Officer Adams, while off duty, was at the Starfire Lounge at Grenshaw Street and Homan Avenue with his sister on the night of August 25, 1973. Officer Adams had pointed out two women in the lounge that he had previously arrested for prostitution. At 2:30 a.m., he was observed leaving with the two women he had pointed out according to witnesses. The women got into Adams car and they drove away.

After a manhunt, Smith surrendered to Wentworth Robbery Detectives on August 28, 1973 without incident.

It was believed that Officer Adams had dropped the two women off at an unknown location and while he was driving his car he observed a disturbance at 3339 West Douglas Boulevard. When he heard gunfire, Officer Adams parked his car and ran to the scene to investigate. At this point, Darryl R. Smith, involved in the dispute pulled out a .38 caliber revolver and fired again, striking Officer Adams. Adams collapsed to the porch floor where he would later be found by responding officers.

Officer Adams was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South cottage Grove Avenue and he was laid to rest on September 1, 1973 in Washington Memorial Cemetery, 701 Ridge Road, Homewood, Illinois.

Probationary Patrolman Thomas J. Adams, Jr., born November 25, 1941, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in February, 1973 and was in Recruit Class 73-1C at the O'Brien Street Police Academy.

Officer Adams served in the U.S. Navy. He was survived by his wife, Dorothy; sons: Daryl, age 4 and Mark, age 2 and parents: Ophelia Price and Thomas J.

On May 21, 1998, Officer Adams' star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Adams' Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Chief of Police George Abner Airey

Image Not Available
Agency:
Morgan Park Police Department
Appointed Date:
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
31 Oct 1903
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Throat Slit
Age:
59
End of Watch:
31 Oct 1903
Unit of Assignment:
Chief's Office
Date of Birth:
1844
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
022 - Morgan Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Greenwood Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 15-E: 22

Incident Details:

Chief of Police George Abner Airey, Star # Unknown, aged 59 years, was a veteran of the Morgan Park Police Department, assigned to the Chief's Office.

On October 31, 1903, Chief Airey was killed when his throat was slit while responding to a citizen complaint. The complaint involved a small group of people creating a disturbance on Halloween night. When Chief Airey arrived he observed what he believed to be a man attempting to overturn a section of wooden sidewalk by pulling it up. The man was Mrs. Hattie Payne, a women dressed in men’s clothing for Halloween. Chief Airey approached and struck Mrs. Payne with his cane. This action set off a racial storm, which had never been seen in the village. Hattie's husband, Webb Payne, her bother, Mack Wiley, age 20 and two friends became enraged. A struggle ensued and Chief Airey was attacked and his throat slit by Mack Wiley. Chief Airey bled to death at the scene.

Six suspects were arrested in connection with Chief Airey's murder. Mack Wiley was arrested in Harvey, Illinois, and taken to Morgan Park police station and was held by the Coroner. Webb Payne, alias James W., and Hattie Payne were also arrested and held as accessories. The Coroner conducted an inquest, in which a crowd of Morgan Park residents attended, which was held at the Englewood police station in Chicago. For four hours witnesses and the prisoners told their version of the murder. An effort was made to show that the crime was premeditated. Residents of Morgan Park had charged this, but close questioning failed to produce sufficient testimony to hold all the prisoners on charges of conspiring to kill. Alonzo McPhee, who had been sworn in as a special policeman for Halloween night, testified that his superior officer struggled with the men when Mrs. Hattie Payne was attempting to take his star. It was at this time, it was stated, that Wiley approached the police official from beside and stabbed him three times about the face and neck. Later the star was found in the grass at Morgan Avenue and Vincennes Road, where the struggle occurred. Aireys mutilated hat with the gold braid missing was also found nearby. Wiley did not deny his guilt, and when asked if he wished to testify offered his written confession. He then wrote his confession and it was tendered to Captain Shippy of the Chicago Police Department.

Mrs. Payne told how she had dressed in men's clothing earlier in the evening and, accompanied by three of her friends, had gone out to celebrate. She was removing boards from a sidewalk when she was accosted by Chief Airey and according to other witnesses was struck on the back by the police official when she ignored his orders. Two hours after the murder was committed. In the second meeting with the chief of police Mrs. Payne accused him of striking her and a quarrel followed, ending in the fatal stabbing of Chief Airey. At the close of the inquest the comments of those most bitter against the prisoners increased in severity until predictions were freely made that the black people in the suburb would be driven away.

Mack Wiley was indicted by the Grand Jury and stood trial. On March 25, 1904, Wiley was sentenced to death on the gallows by Judge Smith. Mrs. Hattie Payne was found guilty of manslaughter.

Chief Airey's funeral mass was held in his residence located at 1218 Church Street and he was laid to rest on November 3, 1903 in Mount Greenwood Cemetery, 2900 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Section 23, Lot 74.

Chief of Police George Abner Airey was born in 1844.

Chief Airey was survived by his wife, Sarah Frances Dixon; children: Alice E., Charles Allen, Frank Fawcett and Howard William and siblings: Charles, David H., Elizabeth Catherine Airey Shipp, John William, Margerat Columbia Airey Templeton, Robert H. Sinthia F. and Virginia Airey Wise.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #40.

The Morgan Park Police Department was absorbed into the Chicago Police Department after the Village of Morgan Park was annexed in 1914.

Detective Joseph M. Airhart Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
29 Nov 1982
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
20931
Incident Date:
28 Aug 2001
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
53
End of Watch:
04 Nov 2008
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 620 - Area 2 Detectives
Date of Birth:
21 Oct 1955
Served:
25 years, 11 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Beverly Cemetery - Blue Island, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 13
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 44-E: 26

Incident Details:

Detective Joseph M. Airhart, Jr., Star #20931, aged 53 years, was a 19 year, 11 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 620 - Area 2 Detectives, detailed to the Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 606 - Central Investigations Detail.

On August 28, 2001, Detective Airhart was leading a joint party of Chicago police officers and FBI agents into a South Loop apartment to arrest Daniel Salley, a former tax preparer turned bank robber, the prime suspect in two successive armed robberies of a South Side bank.

The incident occurred on South Wabash Avenue. As the team entered the man's apartment the suspect fled into the apartment's back room and opened fire, striking Detective Airhart. Salley shot Airhart in the head, shattering the left side of his skull and penetrating his brain. For the next two hours, Salley held hostage and used Airhart as leverage with law enforcement, denying him crucial medical aid. Salley eventually surrendered and was taken into custody.

Detective Airhart remained in a coma for two months, but never fully recovered. He was unable to speak, walk or swallow food as a result of injuries he sustained seven years earlier. Airhart's eventual death was caused by bronchopneumonia, which was linked to the bullet wound he sustained in the shooting. He succumbed to his wounds on November 4, 2008.

Prior to Detective Airhart's death, the suspect, Daniel Salley, had been sentenced to life in prison plus 132 years on 14 other counts, including the attempted murder of Detective Airhart. A judge declared him incompetent to stand trial in 2003, but medical experts eventually ruled Salley was fit. Disdaining three court appointed attorneys, Salley represented himself as he had done throughout almost 5 years of legal proceedings. Attorney Richard Kling was allowed to act as his standby attorney, though the two did not consult, and Kling rarely spoke. He admitted the bank robberies, but said he didn't consider them criminal acts.

Detective Airhart was waked at Cage Memorial Chapel located at 7651 South Jeffery Boulevard, his funeral mass was held at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel located at 5850 South Woodlawn Avenue and he was laid to rest on November 10, 2008 in Beverly Cemetery, 12000 South Kedzie Avenue, Blue Island, Illinois.

Detective Joseph M. Airhart, Jr., born October 21, 1955, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 29, 1982. Prior to being assigned to the FBI Task Force, Detective Airhart was assigned to the Area 2 Detective Division.

Detective Airhart was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his daughter, Melissa; parents; sisters: Denise and brother.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #G514099.

Patrolman James A. Alfano Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Feb 1962
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4707
Incident Date:
13 Aug 1970
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
16 Aug 1970
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Inspectional Services - Intelligence Division: Unit 135 - Gang Intelligence Section
Date of Birth:
29 Jun 1940
Served:
8 years, 4 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 10-W: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman James A. Alfano, Jr., Star #4707, aged 30 years, was an 8 year, 4 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Inspectional Services - Intelligence Division: Unit 135 - Gang Intelligence Section.

On August 13, 1970, Officer James Alfano, Jr., was in an unmarked squad car with his partners, Patrolmen Richard Crowley, the driver and Thomas Donahue, front passenger. The officers were driving in the area of 67th Street and Blackstone Avenue when they noticed the lights were out and the streets were dark. As they drove through an alley behind the Southmoor Hotel located at 6646 South Stony Island Avenue, the former Black P Stone Nation Headquarters until July, 1970, they encountered a blockade in the middle of the alley. Officer Crowley reversed the vehicle and drove into the east-west leg of the alley where he encountered a second blockade. As the officer tried to push the blockade aside with the car, shots rang out. A bullet pierced through the trunk striking Officer Alfano in the liver. He was rushed to Billings Hospital where he underwent numerous surgeries. Over 250 people donated blood in search of Alfano’s rare blood type of AB-positive. Officer Alfano survived for over 70 hours, succumbing to his injuries three days later on August 16, 1970.

In the aftermath 23 people were arrested. In particular, Seven Black P Stone members were arrested in connection to Officer Alfano's murder and charged with conspiracy to commit murder: Lamar Bell, age 26; Charles Bey, age 24; Tony Carter; age 17; Dennis Griffin, age 21; Lee Jackson, age 26; William Troope, age 22 and Eton Wicks, age 22. During the trial, Black P Stone gang member, Ceasar Marsh testified that on the day of Officer Alfano's murder, two gang meetings were held. During the meetings, Edward Bell, number three in command, gave orders to break street lights and set up blockades in order to ambush gang intelligence officers. Marsh heard Bey, number two in command, tell Tony Carter to put two snipers on the ground and one on the hotel's roof. According to Marsh, he saw Carter tampering with two electrical control boxes. Coincidently, four juveniles arrested for breaking lights told officers that the gang had ordered the area be darkened. Another witness, Ernest Williams, age 18, testified that an hour prior to the shooting he saw Bey, Carter and Jackson pushing the couch in the alley while Throope watched and held a rifle in his hand. On January 17, 1971, the seven defendants were acquitted and what followed was months of sniper shootings directed at Chicago Police Officers. In March, 1971, Cesarei Marsh, the witness, was murdered.

Officer Alfano was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, Oak Lawn, Illinois, his funeral mass was held at St. Gerald Church located at 9310 South 55th Court, Oak Lawn, Illinois and he was laid to rest on August 20, 1970 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman James A. Alfano, Jr., born June 29, 1940, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 19, 1962. He earned 28 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Alfano served in the U.S. Marine Corps for four years and was a veteran of the Vietnam War. He was a member of the Chicago Patrolmen's Association, Confederation of Police, Italian American Police Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Judith Wise; children: Jackie, Johnny and Lynne; parents: Angeline Musteri and James A., Sr. and sister, Grace.

Park Policeman William J. Allison

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
304
Incident Date:
15 Jun 1925
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
28
End of Watch:
23 Jun 1925
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
22 Feb 1897
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oakridge Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 15
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 21-E: 9

Incident Details:

Park Policeman William J. Allison, Star #304, aged 28 years, was a veteran of the South Park Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On June 15, 1925, Officer Allison was on duty and riding his motorcycle near Archer and Western Avenues in McKinley Park. The officer was severely injured after being pinned between two vehicles that had crashed. Officer Allison was transported to St. Anthony Hospital where he died eight days later on June 23, 1925.

Officer Allison was waked at his residence located at 2749 West 35th Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Agnes Catholic Church located at 2648 West Persing Road and he was laid to rest in Oakridge Cemetery, 4301 West Roosevelt Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Park Policeman William J. Allison was born February 22, 1897.

Officer Allison was survived by his parents: Christiana Thornton and George and siblings: George, Letty Wiot, Mary Gels and Thomas.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The South Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park district police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the South Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Theodore J. Anderson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
28 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3034
Incident Date:
23 Jul 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
23 Jul 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 2-A - Stanton
Date of Birth:
04 Sep 1898
Served:
3 years, 8 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Memorial Park Cemetery - Skokie, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 17
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 6-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Theodore J. Anderson, Star #3034, aged 27 years, was a 3 year, 8 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2-A - Stanton, Vice Squad.

On July 22, 1926, at 12:00 a.m., Officer Anderson was on foot patrol in plain clothes with his partner, Patrolman Thaddeus Coakley, working the midnight watch. The officers were on the 3100 block of South Wabash Street, where several robberies had taken place over the past few weeks, walking on opposite sides of the street. Officer Anderson observed a suspicious man, Nathaniel "Cry Baby” Davis, alias Joseph Davis, who was lurking in front of a building at 3128 South Wabash Avenue. Anderson stopped Davis for questioning and as he searched him for concealed weapons, Davis produced a revolver. Davis fired a shot, fatally striking the officer causing him to collapse to the sidewalk, as he attempted to run away. Officer Coakley, observing what had occurred, ran across the street firing at Davis. Davis was struck and fell to the ground only a few feet away.

Officer Coakley, thinking Davis was too injured to flee, ran to assist Anderson. Coakley flagged down a taxicab and loaded Anderson into the vehicle. He instructed the cab driver to take him to the nearest hospital. The cab driver set off for Lakeside Hospital but Officer Anderson died enroute. When Officer Coakley turned his attention back to Davis, he was gone having fled the scene. He then used a call box to call for back-up.

Sergeant Albert Booth of the Detective Bureau arrived on scene after hearing of Anderson’s death and a manhunt for Davis was initiated. During the search Sergeant Booth stumbled upon a blood trail. He along with Patrolman Ignatius Sheehan followed the trail to the porch of a house on the 3100 block of South Wabash Avenue. Davis was discovered concealed underneath the front porch and was ordered out by Sergeant Booth. Instead, Davis responded opening fire narrowly missing the sergeant. Sergeant Booth returned fire killing Davis.

Officer Anderson was waked at a chapel located at 2340 West Madison Street, his funeral mass was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest in Memorial Park Cemetery, 9900 Gross Point Road, Skokie, Illinois.

Patrolman Theodore J. Anderson, born September 4, 1898, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 28, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Anderson was a Master Mason and a member of Boulevard Lodge No. 882 AF&AM and Chicago Camp No. 3052 Modern Woodman. He was survived by his wife, Henrietta and parents: Amy and Harry.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7517.

Patrolman Donald E. Andrews

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
12 Oct 1971
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
15701
Incident Date:
01 Jan 1975
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
35
End of Watch:
01 Jan 1975
Unit of Assignment:
21st District - Prairie
Date of Birth:
11 Oct 1939
Served:
3 years, 2 months, 20 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 29
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 11-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Donald E. Andrews, Star #15701, aged 35 years, was a 3 year, 2 month, 20 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 21st District - Prairie.

On January 1, 1975, Officer Howard and his partner Patrolmen Andrews were onduty and responding to a man with a gun call. Officer Andrews, driver of the squad car, and Officer Howard were rushing to the 47th Street Station of the Dan Ryan rapid transit line to intercept two passengers carrying a shotgun. While enroute they were involved in a traffic crash with another squad car. Both squad cars had their sirens blaring and their red lights flashing as they approached the intersection of 46th Street and Michigan Avenue. Officers Andrews and Howard were westbound on 43rd Street and entered the intersection against the red light. The second squad car entered the "blind" intersection from southbound Michigan Avenue. The impact of the collision drove both squad cars onto the sidewalk. Officers Andrews’ and Howard's vehicle rolled end over end for 40 feet, killing both officers. Both Officers were transported to Michael Reese Hospital where they were pronounced dead on arrival. The officers in the second squad car were treated and released for their injuries. The suspect was arrested by other Chicago Police Officers.

Officer Donald Andrews was waked at Czachor Funeral Home located at 3661 South Wood Street, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church located at 3528 South Hermitage and he was laid to rest on January 4, 1975 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Worth, Illinois.

Patrolman Donald E. Andrews, October 11, 1939, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 12, 1971.

Officer Andrews was a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, Chicago Patrolman's Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his daughter, Cara Lee; parents: Frances and Jesse and siblings: Donna Lee, Mackey, Arnold, Edmond and Michael.

On May 25, 2006, Officer Andrews' star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Detective Charles Patrick Annerino Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
1946
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7936
Incident Date:
22 Oct 1954
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
22 Oct 1954
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Division - Robbery Detail
Date of Birth:
17 Mar 1924
Served:
8 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
020 - Lincoln

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-W: 15

Incident Details:

Detective Charles Patrick Annerino, Jr., Star #7936, aged 30 years, was an 8 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Division - Robbery Detail.

On October 22, 1954, just after 12:00 am., Detective Annerino and his two partners, Detectives John Basquette and Bill Murphy, were assigned to search taverns for Augustino "Gus" Amedeo, age 26 of 1416 North Linder Avenue, an escaped prisoner from the County Jail. Detective Annerino was assigned to the search because he knew Amedeo by sight. When Detective Annerino walked into the Circle lounge at 1756 West Lawrence Avenue Amedeo recognized the officer and shot him through the chest. Amedeo fled the lounge and was pursued by Detective Annerino's two partners and the two emptied their guns at him as he eluded them.

A manhunt for Amedeo was conducted. It was learned through investigation that Amedeo Genio, girlfriend of Anedeo, at the restaurant she worked at, Paradise Grill located at 127 North Pulaski Road. Anedeo would call between noon and 1:00 p.m., and had been doing so for the past week. Amedeo was eager to get the 1951 automobile purchased for him in Leonard Del Genio's name. The purchase was arranged October 18, 1954, but delivery was not made until after Detective Annerino's death. The Del Genio family agreed to cooperate with the police and on October 22, 1954 at 12:00 p.m. Amedeo called the diner and directed Dolly Del Genio to drive the car to Eddy and Clark Streets at 7:00 p.m. to pick him up. 25 policemen were concealed around the intersection. Amedeo used this oportunity to test Mrs. Del Genio and see whether she had notified police. He made no effort to reach the car, but neither did he observe the hidden policemen. After waiting 45 minutes she drove home.

At 1:45 p.m. the next day, Amedeo telephoned Mrs. Del Genio again. "Bring the car to Berwyn and Clark tonight," he said. "Have it there at 9 o'clock." Mrs. Del Genio drove alone to the rendezvous, but she was escorted by two cabs, a private car, and a truck, all manned be detectives in plain clothes. They converged at 9:20 p.m. on Berwyn Avenue and Clark Street. Mrs. Del Genio sat in the car, while a score of police guns were aimed at the intersection from half a dozen hiding places. Within a few minutes, Amedeo walked toward the car. Detectives Frank Schulze and Eugene Irven, stationed in a window of a nearby building, called out: "Police officers, halt."

Irven fired a warning shot into the air. Amedeo reached for his hip pocket and started to run. Pape, standing at another window with a 30-30 caliber deer rifle, fired the first shot. It broke Amedeo's right arm and knocked him to the street. Other policemen opened fire. Amedeo raised up part way, fired two ineffective shots, then went down under a new burst of police fire. Amedeo was killed at the scene. Dr. Jerry Kearns of the Coroner's staff found an infected bullet wound in Armedeo's left arm, indicating he had been wounded in the shooting in which Detective Annerino was slain.

On June 28, 1954, Anedeo used a gun to escape from officers who were escorting him from the Cook County Court House back to the jail. His girlfriend, Mrs. Dolores Marcus, age 24 and her brother Leonard Del Genio, age 18, were later arrested for smuggling a gun to Amedeo in court which he used in his escape. She was convicted and sentenced 2 to 3 years in prison. He was convicted and sentenced to 1 to 3 years in prison. He was in jail for burglary.

Detective Annerino was waked at Michael Calcetta & Sons Funeral Home located at 2600 South Wentworth Avenue funeral mass was held at St. Jerome’s Church located at 2823 South Princton Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 26, 1954 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 87th Street and Hamlin Avenue, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Detective Charles Patrick Annerino, born March 17, 1924, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in 1946.

During Detective Annerino's eight years with the Chicago Police Department he had shot and killed three robbers and wounded four others in gunfights. Detective Annerino was promoted to Detective two months prior to his death.

Detective Annerino served in the U.S. Navy and was a veteran of World War II. He was also a member of the Illinois Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Rose Mozzotil; children, Charles P., III and Theresa; parents: Charles P., Sr. and Katherine Fineberg and siblings: August, Corinne and Eleanor.

TOWER TICKER - By Herb Lyon, Big City Vinegarette: Excerpt from the Chicago Daily Tribune, November 15, 1954

One dime, a shiny 10 cent piece doesn't buy very much these days, but a single dime COULD have saved the life of a hero cop. An ironic sidelight in the slaying of Detective Charles Annerino, by the late hood Gus Amedeo, had just come to light in November, 1954. Sure, it's OLD news now, but it sort of makes you wonder.

It happened this way: At about 11 p.m., on that fateful evening, Acting Deputy Chief of Detectives Bill Walsh and Lieutenant Jim Curtin issued an order to send a north side prowl car on a routine trip to Wilmette to pick up a murder suspect. The job was to be assigned to Car 70 carrying Detective Annerino, and his partners Bill Murphy and John Basquette.

At about two minutes after 11:00, car 70 rolled across the intersection of Western and Belmont Avenues and received orders, via the radio, to phone headquarters. Murphy wanted to stop at a drugstore and make the call, but Detective Annerino thought it would be a better idea to go to the Sheffield Avenue Station, some 18 blocks away and save the dime!

Well, as chance would have It traffic was heavy and car 70 didn't get there until over 15 minutes later. In the interim, two downtown detectives who had just come on duty were sent out on the Wilmette run. By the time Detective Annerino reached the phone and called headquarters he was told to forget the whole thing. He never did learn what the other assignment would have been even though it would have saved his life. For it was only a short while later that prowl car 70 rolled to a stop in front of a Lawrence Avenue tavern and Charley walked in to his rendezvous with fate.

If only Charley Annerino would have spent a dime on a phone call, his star wouldn't now be in a cabinet in Commissioner O'Connor's office with the grim notation. "Killed in action." Sure, it's OLD news now but it sort of makes you wonder.

1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Sergeant Thomas J. Babbington

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Mar 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
575
Incident Date:
21 Jan 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
44
End of Watch:
26 Jan 1925
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Division
Date of Birth:
22 Feb 1880
Served:
18 years, 10 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 13
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 32-E: 10

Incident Details:

Sergeant Thomas J. Babbington, Star #575, aged 44 years, was a 18 year, 10 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Division, Ford Squad 20-C.

On January 21, 1925, at 4:30 a.m., Sergeant Babbington entered a "soft drink" parlor at Root Street and Princeton Avenue in search for a wanted offender. As he was arresting the wanted man, several rowdy patrons attacked him. A gun battle ensued and the officer suffered five gunshot wounds. Sergeant Babbington succumbed from his wounds five days later on January 26, 1925. Before Sergeant Babbington died, he was able to identify Emmet Kearns as one of his attackers.

On February 6, 1925, Emmet Kearns was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner, who also recommended the arrest of Michael Doody as an accomplice. Shortly after, Gerald Doody, David De Coursey, George Gay, John Doody and Marie Daley were all arrested and held as accessories. One William Jones also was wanted on a Bulletin. On July 10, 1925, Michael Doody was arrested and turned over to the Cook County Sheriff. On July 16, 1925, all seven were acquitted in the Criminal Court by Judge Williams.

Sergeant Babbington was waked at his residence located at 5128 South Indiana Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Corpus Christi Church located at 4920 South Grand Boulevard (present day Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive) and he was laid to rest on January 28, 1925 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Sergeant Thomas J. Babbington, born February 22, 1880, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 22, 1900. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $180.00 during his career. On September 6, 1913, he was promoted to Desk Sergeant.

Sergeant Babbington was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Kathleen Herne; children: Thomas and William, father, Patrick and siblings: Earl, Harry, Mrs. William McDonald and Ruth.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7549.

Patrolman Joseph P. Baggott

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
06 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3125
Incident Date:
07 Jun 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
51
End of Watch:
07 Jun 1925
Unit of Assignment:
District 20 - Warren
Date of Birth:
11 Mar 174
Served:
19 years, 2 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 25-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph P. Baggott, Star #3125, aged 51 years, was a 19 year, 2 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 20 - Warren.

On June 7, 1925, at 3:55 a.m., Officer Baggott was on patrol when he was approached by a citizen, Arthur Medley, who had been shot at 2352 West Walnut Street. Medley ran to Officer Baggot for assistance, but before he could help, George Galloway, interrupted and shot Medley again striking him in the abdomen. Galloway then turned the gun on Officer Baggott shooting him in the chest just below his heart. As Baggott collapsed to the ground, he was able to draw his weapon and fire at Galloway. Galloway was struck four times and was killed instantly. Mr. Medley and Officer Baggott were taken to Washington Park Hospital. Baggott succumbed to his wounds at 9:40 a.m. the same day. Medley succumbed to his wounds the next day on June 13, 1925.

Officer Baggott was waked at a chapel located at 1158 North Clark Street, his funeral mass was held in Kilbourn, Wisconsin and he was laid to rest in Calvary Cemetery, 200-1099 Indiana Avenue, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin.

Patrolman Joseph P. Baggott, born March 11, 1874, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 6, 1906. He earned 7 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer Baggott was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his siblings: Jerome, John, Margaret and Mary.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8541.

Police Officer Michael Ray Bailey Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Mar 1990
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
13970
Incident Date:
18 Jul 2010
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
62
End of Watch:
18 Jul 2010
Unit of Assignment:
1st District - Central
Date of Birth:
14 Aug 1947
Served:
20 years, 3 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Evergreen Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 10
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 15
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4-E: 27

Incident Details:

Police Officer Michael Ray Bailey, Sr., Star #13970, aged 62 years, was a 20 year, 3 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st District - Central.

On 18 July 2010, at approximately 6:20 a.m., Officer Bailey had just returned home from his shift on a mayoral protection detail guarding Mayor Richard Daley's South Loop residence, and was still in uniform. While cleaning his new Buick Regal, an early retirement gift he had purchased, outside his Park Manor neighborhood home as many as three male subjects approached and attempted to rob him of his vehicle. He identified himself as a police officer and exchanged gunfire with the suspects. It is unknown whether any of the offenders were wounded. They fled the scene and remain at large. Officer Baily was transported to Northwestern Memorial Hospital where he was pronounced dead less than an hour after the shooting. Three guns, including the murder weapon, were recovered at the scene.

Officer Bailey was waked at A.R. Leak and Sons Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue, his funeral mass was held on July 23, 2010 at St. Sabina Catholic Church located at 1210 West 78th Place. He was cremated and laid to rest in Evergreen Cemetery, 3401 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Police Officer Michael Ray Bailey, Sr., born August 14, 1947, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 26, 1990 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. Upon completion of his training he was assigned to the 1st District for his entire career. Officer Bailey was one month from retiring, and planned to retire on August 14, 2010 after reaching the mandatory retirement age of 63. He had also previously served as a fireman with the Glenview Fire Department.

Officer Bailey served in the U.S. Air Force. He was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Bailey was survived by his wife, Pamela; son, Michael; two daughters; brother; sister and 14 grandchildren.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HS416643.

On April 26, 2011, Officer Bailey's star was retired by Interim Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Curtis R. Baker

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Nov 1967
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12212
Incident Date:
02 Jun 1984
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
45
End of Watch:
02 Jun 1984
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Special Operations Group: Unit 701 - Public Transportation Section
Date of Birth:
30 Aug 1938
Served:
16 years, 6 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, line 40
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 34-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Curtis R. Baker, Star #12212, aged 46 years, was a 16 year, 6 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Special Operations Group: Unit 701 - Public Transportation Section Tactical Unit.

On June 2, 1984, at 1:30 a.m., Officer Baker was off duty and in plainclothes when he was escorting a woman to her apartment in the Robert Taylor Homes at 4500 South Federal Street. Three men, Bernard Lash, 22, David Govan, 26 and Eugene Jackson, 19, trailed the pair when one shouted "stickup." The incident occurred in the 4th floor stairwell. Officer Baker drew his gun from its holster but was shot by Lash before he could fire his weapon. All three offenders fled without taking anything. Officer Baker sustained a gunshot wound to the chest and was transported to Michael Reese Hospital and at 2:00 a.m. was pronounced dead on arrival.

Bernard Lash, David Govan and Eugene Jackson were later identified and charged with murder and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. All three were ordered held without bond.

Officer Baker was laid to rest in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Curtis R. Baker, born August 30, 1938, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 13, 1967.

Officer Baker was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, son and daughter.

Patrolman Leonard Frank Baldy

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
21 Sep 1953
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1451
Incident Date:
02 May 1960
Cause of Death:
Crash - Helicopter
Age:
33
End of Watch:
02 May 1960
Unit of Assignment:
Traffic Division - Public Safety Education Bureau
Date of Birth:
15 Feb 1927
Served:
6 years, 7 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 6
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 36-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Leonard Frank Baldy, Star #1451, aged 33 years, was a 6 year, 7 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Traffic Division - Public Safety Education Bureau.

On May 2, 1960, at 3:45 p.m., Officer Baldy checked in at the WGN newsroom in Tribune Tower and then went to Meigs Field, where his helicopter took off. Baldy was next heard at 4:20 p.m. when he checked into the WGN master control station by short wave radio. Speaking to the radio announcer calling the Cubs game who asked "Where are you, Len, I can hear your copter, but I can't see you." "I'm right over the baseball field," Baldy replied. "I'm right over center field." That was the last words heard from Officer Baldy.

As Officer Baldy and the pilot, H. George Ferry, were airborne and Baldy was preparing his traffic report aboard the helicopter. Suddenly the helicopter threw a main rotor blade, tilted to one side and burst into flames. Witness reports also said that the helicopter also exploded in flight. The helicopter crashed on the Chicago and North Western railway right of way near Hubbard Street and Milwaukee Avenue. The craft struck the north parapet of the railway embankment, just west of the overpass which carries tracks over Union and Milwaukee Avenues. Fragments of the helicopter were scattered over an area a block square. Part of the fuselage remained on the tracks, but the remainder crashed into Hubbard Street and Union Avenue, miraculously missing automobiles in evening rush hour traffic. The tail section, which was blown off while the craft was in flight, landed in a yard located at 707 West Grand Avenue. The pilot was decapitated in the crash and thrown from the wreckage. Officer Baldy's body was found still inside the plastic and aluminum cabin of the wreckage. Both men died instantly.

The Helicopter, a Bell 47H three-place copter, was owned by Helicopter Air Lift, a division of Sky Motive, Inc., based at O'Hare Field. The craft was worth $50,000 and carried $5,000 worth of equipment. Hal Connors General Manager of Air Lift, said that an investigation was being conducted jointly by the Civil Aeronautics Board, the Federal Aviation Agency, the company, and Bell Aircraft Corporation, manufacturer of the helicopter.

The investigation into the cause of the crash revealed that the copter's two main lifting rotor wings broke away in flight, probably as a result of a part failure. An examination of the helicopter wreckage disclosed that the rotor blade section which broke away had been torn out at its roots. The hub of the blade still remained in the jaws of the rotating gimbal, which was at the top of the power mast. That confirmed opinions of experts that the rotor failure was secondary to an earlier breakage in the head. The blade itself was of a mixed type. The spar was a steel tube with wood lamination of spruce, balsa, and stainless steel. This type had been the most widely used, safety agents said, ruling out metal fatigue in the blade itself.

Patrolman Baldy was assigned to the department's Traffic Division, Public Safety Education Bureau, which provided citizens live traffic reports from a helicopter. His reports were a public service for which he received no remuneration. His salary of $10,000 per year for the broadcasts was instead paid to the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. Under police department rules, Baldy could not receive money for a public service. Baldy would broadcast the news four times a day at 7:05 and 9:00 a.m. and again at 4:30 and 6:05 p.m. He advised Chicago motorists on how to avoid traffic tie-ups. He became one of the best known policemen in the city and was nicknamed the "copter copper."

Officer Baldy was waked at a Funeral home located at 3834 West Irving Park Road, his funeral mass was held at St. Juliana Parish Church located at 7200 North Osceola Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 6, 1960 in All Saints Catholic Cemetery, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Patrolman Leonard Frank Baldy, born February 15, 1927, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 21, 1953. Officer Baldy was assigned to the Traffic Division after his recruit training and gained early recognition in his police career for being the first patrolman in the United States to experiment with and use the radar gun to detect the speed of vehicles in April of 1954. He also wrote the first ticket in the world for speeding using a radar device. As a patrolman in the mid 1950's he appeared in a television commercial directing traffic. He became the most visible department spokesperson when he provided lectures and taught classes to civic groups, organizations, and educational institutions on the topic of traffic safety. He provided the first helicopter traffic report over WGN radio in November 1958.

Baldy also gained fame during the Our Lady of the Angels School Fire, in December 1958, when he broadcast his observations from his helicopter above the scene. He provided traffic instructions over the radio to fire and ambulance vehicles trying to reach the fire through Chicago's congested streets. Both Baldy and WGN radio received public service awards from the National Transportation Safety Board for their efforts. After his death, he was elected to the American Police Hall of Fame. 46 years after his death a street was renamed "Leonard Baldy Way" in his honor.

Officer Baldy served in the U.S. Navy for three years as a Signalman on the U.S.S. Markab, mostly in the Pacific and was a veteran of World War II. He was also a member of the Illinois Police Association and the St. Jude Police League. Officer Baldy was survived by his wife, Marguerite Easthope; children: Judith, Raymond and Timothy and father, Frank.

In January, 1961, Officer Baldy's star was retired by Superintendent Orlando W. Wilson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Baldy's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Canine Handler Frank T. Balzano

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Feb 1958
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
10528
Incident Date:
13 Nov 1997
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Blunt Trauma
Age:
65
End of Watch:
14 Nov 1997
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 050 - Canine Bomb Detection Unit
Date of Birth:
08 Sep 1932
Served:
39 years, 8 months, 29 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
Norridge, IL

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Elm Lawn Cemetery - Elmhurst, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Canine Handler Frank T. Balzano, Star #10528, aged 65 years, was a 39 year, 8 month, 29 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 050 - Canine Bomb Detection Unit.

On November 13, 1997, Officer Balzano was working as a part time security guard at the Harlem and Irving Plaza in Norridge. Officer Balzano attempted to break up a fight between two teenage girls when one of the girls, Amy Landers, 16, called out to her boyfriend, Zbigniew “Ziggy” Krzeckowski, age 16, for help. Krzeckowski punched the officer in the face causing him to fall to the ground and hit his head. Officer Balzano was transported to Resurrection Medical Center where he died the next morning on November 14, 1997.

Landers was arrested and charged with 1st degree murder. Krzeckowski was also arrested and charged as a juvenile with aggravated battery. In 2000, both Krzeckowski and Landers later pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter. Landers was sentenced to 3 years’ probation, including 1 year of intensive anger management counseling. Krzeckowski was sentenced to 4 years in prison.

Officer Balzano was waked at Olson Funeral Home located at 6467 North Northwest Highway, his funeral mass was also held at Olson Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on November 16, 1997 in Elm Lawn Cemetery, 401 East Lake Street, Elmhurst, Illinois.

Canine Handler Frank T. Balzano, born September 8, 1932, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 16, 1958. He was planning to retire in six weeks at the time of his death.

Officer Balzano served in the U.S. Army and was a veteran of the Korean War. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police, a Master Mason and a Noble of the Medinah Shrine Temple member of the Black Horse Troop. He was survived by his wife, Jean; children: Cathy, Daniel and Frank, Jr.; mother, Louise Nelson; two brothers, sister and grandchildren.

Patrolman George Thomas Barker

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
175
Incident Date:
13 Mar 1932
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
13 Mar 1932
Unit of Assignment:
35th District - East Chicago
Date of Birth:
01 May 1896
Served:
9 years, 4 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 32
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-W: 15

Incident Details:

Patrolman George Thomas Barker, Star #175, aged 35 years, was a 9 year, 4 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 35th District - East Chicago.

On March 13, 1932, at 1:40 a.m., Officer Barker, while off duty, was on medical leave after being shot in front of his home after resisting a robbery attempt in July, 1931. Officer Barker was at the restaurant of Irving Grossman’s, a “Soda Parlor,” located at 1438 West Madison Street. He was there celebrating the 13th wedding anniversary of his friends James and Helen Bingley while also in the company of actresses Sue Ross and Wilma Thompson. They were all at the bar in the back of the restaurant with Mr. Grossman when the two armed bandits entered, announcing an armed robbery. When Officer Barker confronted the offenders, a gun battle ensued. Officer Barker was able to prevent the robbery firing three rounds at the bandits before he was fatally wounded in the incident. Officer Barker was shot in chest and abdomen and was rushed to Cook County Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds later the same day. For some unknown reason, Officer Barker identified himself as Joe Anson before giving his real name once at the hospital.

A doctor who had a practice near the restaurant reported that two men entered his office shortly after the shooting seeking medical attention for gunshot wounds. When he informed the men that he would have to call police to report the injuries, the men left the office. The men were later identified as Nick Konemogloos, alias Nick or John Petros and Charles L. Hughes. On January 20, 1933, Konemogloos was identified in New York City and was extradited back to Chicago by State’s Attorney Officers to stand trial for murder. He was found guilty and on May 8, 1993 he was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Konemogloos died in prison while serving his sentence in the 1960's. It is unknown if Hughes was ever arrested for his part in the crime.

Officer Barker was waked at his residence located at 2816 West Arthington Street, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Sorrows Basilica located at 3121 West Jackson Boulevard and he was laid to rest on March 17, 1932 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman George Thomas Barker, born May 1, 1896, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 26, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Barker was survived by his wife, Myrtle Sennott; children: Dorothy and George and siblings: Frank F. and Raymond J.

Patrolman Cornelius “Connie” Barrett

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
31 Jul 1882
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
63
Incident Date:
31 May 1885
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
31 May 1885
Unit of Assignment:
1st Precinct - Harrison Street Station
Date of Birth:
1851
Served:
2 years, 10 months, 0 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-W: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Cornelius "Connie" Barrett, Star #63, aged 34 years, was a 2 year, 10 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st Precinct - Harrison Street Station.

On May 31, 1885, A fateful course of events led to the death of Officer Barrett. Just before noon, the railway policeman on duty at the Polk Street station called upon Lieutenant Laughlin of the Chicago Police Department, stationed at the Harrison Street Station. The railway policeman showed the lieutenant a dispatch he had received, it read as follows:

”CHENOA, May 31, 1885. – Depot Policeman, Chicago: I have an insane man on my train who has possession of one car. Policemen at Kansas City, Jacksonville, and Peoria all afraid to take him. Please send ten or twelve policemen out on No. 1 to take him when we arrive in Chicago. They had better come in citizens’ clothes, and will have to look sharp or some will get hurt. PUTNAM, Conductor No. 6”

The suspect, Lewis Reaume, age 33, boarded the train in Kansas City, was drunk and went among passengers asking them to drink with him. When they refused he became a raving maniac, produced a .44 caliber Colt revolver, and ran everyone from the car he was in. Under the idea that he was being pursued by a lynch mob, he shot at everyone whom he saw, seriously wounding a passenger agent.

Lieutenant Laughlin remarked that he thought it was the duty of the railway policemen to arrest the man and asked the railway officer why he did not go to the station. He responded, “I can’t get away.” The lieutenant then asked, “Will you go down with us?” The railway policeman said, “I can’t, but I will send a janitor with you.” Seeing that there was no assistance to be had from the railway police, the lieutenant dismissed the officer. The Lieutenant then sent a dispatch to the Town of Lake Police Department, knowing the train to be coming through their town before it reached Chicago. The reply from them was of no help as well, they replied, “We haven’t any officers; they have gone to a picnic.”

The lieutenant now agitated with none too credible reflections about the courage of out of town policemen, took the case in hand. A squad of twelve officers was selected and left the station at 2:15 p.m. to meet the train. The train was scheduled to arrive at the Polk Street Station in the Union Depot at 2:30 p.m. The depot was situated between 3rd Avenue (present day Plymouth Court) and 4th Avenue (present day Federal Street). The squad consisted of Lieutenant Laughlin, Detectives Amstien, Ferry and O’Brien, and Patrolmen Barrett, Casey, Cox, Dohney, Keovan, Murphy, Rowan and Ryan. The patrolmen were in uniform while the other officers were in plainclothes. To attract less attention the detail separated into squads of two and three officers. Accompanying the officers was a reporter from the Chicago Daily Tribune.

Once at the train station the officers chatted and planned their course of attack passing the time. The depot policeman notified Lieutenant Laughlin that the train was running late and would not arrive until 3:35 p.m. The ticket agent then informed the lieutenant that the crazy man on the train was not armed, but that he had broken the shackles that had secured his hands and was using the shackles as a weapon. The lieutenant remarked, “O, well, if he has no other weapons we can overpower him easily enough. I feel relieved.” It wasn’t long before a telegram came from Western Indiana Junction which said that the crazy man was armed and that officers should be cautious as the man was desperate.

News that a maniac had taken over a train spread and crowds of people began to fill the train depot. At exactly 3:35 p.m. a long whistle and shouts of “Here she comes!” spread through the depot, the train was now rounding a curve. As the train pulled into the station, the engineer blew a series of short whistles. The door to baggage car opened and men started leaping out warning the people to get out of the way. Before the train came to a complete stop, men and women scarred for their lives leapt from the train. The officers, now stationed on both sides of the track moved towards the rear, staying close to the cars as they went. At 3:45 p.m. Officer Barrett and Keenan were on the east side the train and were just about to reach the train car when they heard a loud report. Almost immediately Officer Barrett grabbed Officer Keenan and clutched his breast. As he collapsed to the platform he gasped and said, “I’m shot.” These were the last words he ever spoke and died shortly thereafter. Reaume had fired through the train’s door, the bullet striking Officer Barrett in the left breast and then exiting between the shoulders. Immediately following the first shot, all the officers leveled their pistols at the train car and began firing on the crazy man.

Reaume, shot once by Lieutenant Laughlin, jumped from the train car and ran northbound on the platform brandishing his gun. Reaching the front of the train, he then fled westbound crossing the tracks and headed for 4th Avenue (present day Federal Street). The police gave chase with Lieutenant Laughlin at Reaume’s heels. Once Reaume reached 4th Avenue he turned and rested his pistol on his left arm taking aim at Lieutenant Laughlin who was now twenty feet away. Reaume pulled the trigger, but the gun didn’t discharge. Reaume had spent all his ammunition. Seeing this the lieutenant didn’t fire his gun and rushed toward him. Realizing he was now surrounded, Reaume ran back towards the train depot. As he reached the west track in the depot, Lieutenant Laughlin tackled him. The two men struggled and Reaume struck the lieutenant in the head with his pistol several times. The lieutenant yelled, “take the gun away!” and Officer Rowen grabbed the gun from Reaume. It was at this time that John Klein, a citizen, ran up and yelled, “Kill the fuck!” Mistaking the lieutenant for Reaume he hit him over the head with a large brick. The lieutenant sustained a serious gash to his head from the brick in addition to the cuts from Reaume’s pistol strikes. Before Mr. Klein could inflict more damage, he was stopped by the other officers’ onscene. Reaume was taken into custody and loaded into the patrol wagon, which took him to the Armory. Officer Barrett was loaded into a second patrol wagon and taken to the station.

Almost 150 rounds were fired in the incident. Although critically wounded, Lieutenant Laughlin eventually recovered from his injuries. John Klein was arrested and convinced that his actions were sincere; Lieutenant Laughlin released him. Lewis Reaume sustained three gunshots in the back and was critically wounded eventually recovering from his wounds. On July 9, 1885, he was declared insane, and sent to the insane asylum in Elgin, Michigan.

Officer Barrett was waked at his residence located at No. 33 Wesson Street (present day Cambridge Avenue), his funeral mass was held at Holy Name Church and he was laid to rest on June 2, 1885 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Cornelius "Connie" Barrett, born in 1851, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 31, 1882.

Officer Barrett was survived by his sister.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman John J. Barrett

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Jan 1885
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
557
Incident Date:
04 May 1886
Cause of Death:
Explosion - Bomb
Age:
25
End of Watch:
06 May 1886
Unit of Assignment:
3rd Precinct - Desplaines Street Station
Date of Birth:
1862
Served:
1 year, 3 months, 21 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 40-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman John J. Barrett, Star #557, aged 25 years, was a 1 year, 3 month, 21 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to 3rd Precinct - Desplaines Street Station.

On May 4, 1886, Officer Barrett was with other officers assigned to disperse protesters near Haymarket Square. A bomb was thrown and exploded amidst officers. The explosion was followed by an intense gun battle. Patrolman Barrett was shot through the liver and sustained serious wounds to the head, side and shoulder due to a bomb explosion. Patrolman Barrett was taken to Cook County Hospital where he died two days later at 11:55 a.m. on May 6, 1886. He was the second of eight officers killed in the historic Haymarket Tragedy.

Eight men were arrested and charged with the officers’ murders. Seven were convicted of murder and sentenced to death. The other one was sentenced to 15 years in prison. On November 11, 1887, four of them were executed by hanging. The day before one of the suspects killed himself in his cell with a smuggled dynamite cap, which he detonated in his mouth. The other three were pardoned by Governor John P. Altgeld in 1893.

Eight police officers were killed during the Haymarket Riot labor dispute. The officers were at the scene of a civil disorder when the rioters opened fire and threw a bomb into the crowd. Eight police officers suffered fatal wounds and 70 other people were injured by the gunfire and explosion.

The officers who were killed in the Haymarket Riot, in order of their death, include:

  • Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, End of Watch May 4, 1886
  • Patrolman John J. Barrett, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman George F. Miller, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, End of Watch May 8, 1886
  • Patrolman Michael Sheehan, End of Watch May 9, 1886
  • Patrolman Nels Hansen, End of Watch May 14, 1886
  • Patrolman Thomas Redden, End of Watch May 16, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy O'Sullivan, End of Watch June 14, 1888

Officer Barrett was waked at his residence, his funeral mass was held at St. Stephen's Church and he was laid to rest on May 9, 1886 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman John J. Barrett, born in 1862, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 15, 1885.

Officer Barrett was survived by his wife, Annie Walpole; mother; brother and three sisters.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #97 and Case #2743.

In response to the tragic events of May 4, 1886 a commemorative nine-foot (2.7 meter) bronze statue of a Chicago policeman was commissioned to honor the sacrifice of the policemen who lost their lives that fateful night. The statue was designed by Frank Batchelder of St. Paul Minnesota in 1889 and sculpted by sculptor Johannes Gelert of New York, New York. The statue's marble pedestal was ordered to have an inscription on it. The inscription is the command that Captain William Ward delivered in the Haymarket just before the bomb was thrown that fateful night: "In the name of the People of Illinois, I command peace." The statue was funded by private funds raised by the Union League Club of Chicago. The statue would become the first known monument erected in the United States honoring policemen. Erected in the middle of Haymarket Square located on Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, the statue was unveiled on May 30, 1889. The unveiling was conducted by Frank Degan, the son of Officer Mathias Degan who was killed in the Haymarket Affair. Over the years the statue would be moved seven times, it would also be repaired and rebuilt several times due to vandalism.

  • Location #1 - Haymarket Square (May 30, 1889 thru July, 1900): Haymarket Square was the first location in which the statue would be erected. It was placed in the middle of Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, as seen in the image above. The statue interfered with the flow of traffic in this busy area, and it became an object of vandalism. As a result, it was moved in 1900 about one mile west, to Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue, near Union Park.

  • Location #2 - Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue (July, 1900 thru 1928): The statue remained at its second location for just over 27 years. A medallion, which is evident in the photo above, is located just above the inscription. Also visible are two white dots just below the inscription. Those two dots are of the original mounting holes for the medallion. It is believed that due to vandalism, the medallion was moved higher up the monuments pedestal. On May 4, 1927, the 41st anniversary of the Haymarket affair, a Chicago Surface Lines streetcar jumped its tracks and crashed into the statue's pedestal. The force of the crash dislodged the statue from the pedestal and the statue fell over falling off the base. The motorman, William Schultz, of the streetcar stated that the brakes failed as he was rounding the corner. He also later said that he was "sick of seeing that policeman with his arm raised." The city restored the statue in 1928 and moved the pedestal and statue into nearby Union Park.

  • Location #3 - Union Park (1928 thru June 2, 1957): The monument was located near Washington Boulevard on the North side of the street facing south and it remained in Union Park for nearly three decades. The finials, which flank the pedestal, had been modified after one of the monument's earlier moves. This change is believed to be the result of vandal damage or from being stripped at various times. During the 1950's, construction of the Kennedy Expressway erased about half of the old, run-down Haymarket Square Area, and on June 2, 1957, the statue was moved to Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway.

  • Location #4 - Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway (June 2, 1957 thru February 5, 1972): The Statue was situated on the north side of Randolph Street a block west of Desplaines Street at 700 West Randolph Street, just to the east of the new Kennedy Expressway. A new platform was built to support the pedestal and statue overlooking the expressway, only 200 feet from its original location. After years of vandalism the pedestal was badly stained and chipped as can be seen in the photo above.

    On May 4, 1968, The Haymarket statue was vandalized with black paint, the 82nd anniversary of the Haymarket affair, following a confrontation between police and demonstrators at a protest against the Vietnam War. The city named the monument a historic landmark in the mid-1960’s, but this did not prevent further vandalism, presumably in protest against police brutality in the context of opposition to the Vietnam War and social inequality in the United States. On October 6, 1969, in what was almost certainly a deliberate symbolic reenactment of the original Haymarket meeting, someone placed a powerful explosive between the legs of the statue, blowing out about a hundred windows nearby and sending chunks of the statue's legs onto the expressway below. Weather Underground members, known as Weatherman, took credit for the blast and battled police elsewhere in the streets of Chicago over several days. The statue was rebuilt and unveiled on May 4, 1970.

    The statue was repaired, but early on the morning of October 5, 1970, it was blown up again. The body of the statue badly bent a nearby railing as it fell before settling on the expressway embankment, and one of the legs landed two hundred feet away. Immediately after the blast, a person or persons called various news outlets to declare that the bombing was the work of the Weathermen. According to one newspaper, the caller said, "We just blew up Haymarket Square Statue for the second year in a row to show our allegiance to our brothers in the New York prisons and our black brothers everywhere. This is another phase of our revolution to overthrow our racist and fascist society. Power to the People." The two attacks on the police statue were among several politically-motivated bombings throughout the country at the time.

    An angry and determined Mayor Richard J. Daley had the statue repaired again and put under 24 police protection. On February 5, 1972, the statue was moved to the State Street Chicago Police Headquarters Building. The pedestal remained at this location for 24 more years and was finally removed in 1996. It is unknown whether the pedestal was scrapped or placed into storage by the city.

  • Location #5 - State Street Chicago Police Headquarters (February 5, 1972 thru October 5, 1976): On February 5, 1972, the statue was placed on a new marble pedestal located in the lobby of the State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building at 1121 South State Street. The statue remained on display in the headquarters lobby for four years and eight months. On October 5, 1976, the statue was then relocated to the new Chicago Police Training Academy. The State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building has since been raised and a new commercial and residential complex was built in its place.

  • Location #6 - Chicago Police Training Academy (October 5, 1976 thru June 1, 2007): On October 5, 1976, the statue was moved from the Old Chicago Police Headquarters Building and placed on a new granite pedestal, located in a secure outdoor courtyard at the Chicago Police Training Academy located at 1300 West Jackson Street for twenty years.

  • Location #7 - Michigan Avenue Chicago Police Headquarters (June 1, 2007 thru Present): On June 1, 2007 the statue was rededicated at Chicago Police Headquarters located at 3501 South State Street and placed on a new pedestal. The rededication unveiling was conducted by Geraldine Doceka, Officer Mathias Degan's great-granddaughter. The statue currently resides at this location.

Patrolman Edward L. Barron

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Mar 1970
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
14571
Incident Date:
28 Sep 1973
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
28 Sep 1973
Unit of Assignment:
4th District - South Chicago
Date of Birth:
01 Dec 1937
Served:
3 years, 6 months, 26 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 27
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward L. Barron, Star #14571, aged 35 years, was a 3 year, 6 month, 26 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th District - South Chicago.

On September 28, 1973, at 1:58 p.m., Officer Barron was working with his partner, Patrolman Daniel P. Abate, age 31 and assisting officer Patrolman Keith Grabowski. The officers responded to a call of a robbery in progress at 8005 South Kingston Avenue. Joseph Bigsby, age 16, had just robbed and pistol-whipped one of two elderly victims who were walking their dog. Mr. Lewis Little, age 67, robbery victim, stated that Bigsby robbed him of 55 cents and then returned 25 cents saying, "I can't do anything with that." The second victim was robbed of an unknown amount of money and left the scene without being identified. First to arrive on the scene was Sergeant Mitchel, who after seeing Bigsby ordered him to stop but he turned and fled. The sergeant fired a shot and put out a flash message for Bigsby. Another Sergeant, Anthony Norka, located Bigsby at 7059 South Kingston and exchanged fire with him. Bigsby continued to flee when he was located in a gangway at 7958 South Colfax Avenue by Officer Barron and his partner. Bigsby responded by drawing a Luger pistol, which was used in the robberies and again exchanged gunfire with the officers, striking Officer Barron in the head killing him instantly. Officer Abate returned fire, striking Bigsby, and he went down. It was at that time that Officer Abate saw Officer Barron go down. Officer Abate retreated to his squad car and radioed the task force and then reentered the yard with Officer Grabowski. Bigsby was captured in the rear yard at 7958 South Colfax Avenue and sustained a gunshot wound to his left calf during the chase.

Bigsby was taken to Burnside police headquarters and was identified by Mr. Little and two other witnesses as the offender. Bigsby was held on a juvenile petition and was later charged and on May 29, 1975 convicted of Murder, three counts of attempt murder and two counts of armed robbery. In September 1973, Bigsby was sentenced to serve 270 years in prison. On June 19, 2013, Bigsby became eligible for parole and had his hearing. On June 27, 2013 the parole board denied Bigsby's request for parole. Bigsby became eligible for parole again in 2015. On June 25, 2015, Bigsby was granted parole in an 8 to 7 vote by the Illinois Parole Board.

Officer Barron was waked at Lain & Son Chapel located at 2121 West 95th Street, his funeral mass was held at St. George Roman Catholic Church located at 9546 South Ewing Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 2, 1973 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Edward L. Barron, born December 1, 1937, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 2, 1970. He earned 5 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer Barron was a member of Chicago Patrolman's Association, Confederation of Police, Illinois Police Association, St. Jude Police League, and the Trinity Council No. 3755 Knights of Columbus. He was survived by his wife, Nancy Baloch; children: Linda, age 13 and Paul, age 14; mother, Ethel Klefisch and siblings: Carol Stipanich, Joan Anderson, John T., Lovila McGlashan, Ronald W., Willene Montez and Reverend Wayne J. Barron of the St. Jude Police League.

On May 21, 1998, Officer Barron's star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Barron's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Dec 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
881
Incident Date:
30 Oct 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
47
End of Watch:
31 Oct 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 9 - Kensington
Date of Birth:
03 Oct 1879
Served:
18 years, 10 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Cedar Park Cemetery - Calumet Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 11-W: 11

Incident Details:

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley, Star #881, aged 47 years, was an 18 year, 10 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 9 - 115th Street Station.

On October 30, 1926, Detectives from the Kensington station were searching the area for a notorious car thief, Timothy Hennessy, who was a known member of an organized gang of auto thieves. At 2:15 p.m., Sergeant Beardsley and his partner, Sergeant Andrew Harrah, located Hennessy’s cohorts, Stanley Gracyas and Henry Perry, in a garage located at 312 West 116th Street. Gracyas and Perry were attempting to transport a stolen car being temporarily stored in the garage that was recently rented by Hennessy. The sergeants were able to safely arrest Gracyas, but Perry was able to escape. Sergeant Harrah went back to the scene to investigate the garage and Gracyas’ rooming house while Sergeant Beardsley dealt with Gracyas. Once Gracyas was alone with Beardsley, he pulled out a concealed revolver and fired at Beardsley. Gracyas then jumped into an automobile with Hennessey and escaped. As they were escaping, Sergeant James J. O'Brien appeared. O’Brien exchanged gunfire with Gracyas as they made good their escape and was struck by a bullet in the right hand. Officer Beardsley succumbed to his wounds the next day on October 31, 1926.

After an extensive manhunt, Henry Perry was located and arrested a block away. On December 7, 1926, the Coroner recommended the arrest of Gracyas as the principal and Tim Hennessey as an accessory and held Henry Perry as an accessory. On February 8, 1927, Gracyas was apprehended, brought back from Colorado and turned over to the Sheriff. Hennessy was also arrested and charged with accessory to murder. On April 15, 1927, Hennessey's and Perry's cases were stricken off the record by Judge Sullivan.

Sergeant Beardsley’s funeral service was held at Carson’s Morgue located at 119th Street and Stewart Avenue and he was laid to rest in Cedar Park Cemetery, 12540 South Halsted Street, Calumet Park, Illinois.

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley, born October 3, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 23, 1907. He earned 5 Credible Mentions during his career. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915. On June 28, 1921, he was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Beardsley was a Master Mason. He was survived by his wife, father and brother.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7646.

On September 14, 1928, Patrolman James J. O'Brien would be shot in the line of duty dying two days later on September 16, 1928.