LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

  • The results are being filtered by the character: A
1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Detective Louis A. Abbott Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Feb 1944
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
762
Incident Date:
14 Feb 1947
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
03 Mar 1947
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
07 May 1908
Served:
3 years, 0 months, 23 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Laurel Hill Cemetery - Erie, Pennsylvania
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 45
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 12W: 11

Incident Details:

Detective Louis A. Abbott, Star #762, aged 38 years, was a 3 year, 0 month, 23 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Wabash.

On February 14, 1947, Detective Abbott was investigating a series of robberies in the 5th and 27th Districts with Detectives Louis Cella and Barney Halperin. All three of the Detectives were able to take two of the men involved into custody. Another detail of officers stationed at 5244 South Dearborn Street, the apartment of a third suspect William McKinley, 33, learned of his whereabouts. The officers on the detail nabbed a teenager, John Forsythe, who related that McKinley had sent him there to pick up clothing. Forsythe said that he had last seen McKinley at the corner of 43rd Street and St. Lawrence Avenue. It was certain that McKinley would be found and arrested.

At 11:10 p.m., Detectives Abbott, Cella and Halperin went to the location in search of McKinley but were unable to find him. Detectives Cella and Halperin decided to give up the hunt for that evening at 11:00 p.m. and returned to the station. Detective Abbott decided to continue looking for McKinley. At 11:10 p.m., Detective Abbott located McKinley at 53rd and State Streets. As Abbott attempted to question McKinley the ex-convict drew a gun and shot the detective. Abbott was struck in his liver and despite being critically wounded Abbott drove himself to Provident Hospital.

Approximately 15 minutes after Detectives Cella and Halperin returned to the station they received a report that Detective Abbott was being treated for a gunshot wound at Provident Hospital. The identity of Abbotts shooter was discovered and a massive manhunt was begun for McKinley. The manhunt spread across the city and on February 15, 1947, at 3:30 a.m., McKinley was located by officers and a gunfight ensued. McKinley was shot in the head and chest multiple times dying on scene. Detective Abbott clung to life for three weeks in the hospital before succumbing to his injuries 20 days later on March 3, 1947, outliving his killer.

Detective Abbott was described by the Chief of the Uniformed Force, Raymond Crane, as "one of the finest detectives I know," according to the Chicago Times. Crane had claimed that Abbott had made ten times more burglary arrests than any other man in the Department. Captain Jerome Looney of the Wabash Avenue Station said Abbott often worked 24 hours straight while on a case. Abbott was called one of the bravest men in the police department by his coworkers and had become known for his fearlessness in hunting south side law breakers. He was remembered by others as a "lone wolf" who dedicated many of his off duty hours to hunting criminals. He was also the partner of Detective Bernard L. Halperin for many years, Halperin would also be slain in the line of duty on December 20, 1957.

Tragically, Detective Barney Halperin would also be killed in the line of duty just over 10 years after this incident on December 20, 1957.

Detective Abbott was laid to rest in Laurel Hill Cemetery, 3822 Ridge Avenue, Erie Pennsylvania.

Detective Louis A. Abbott, born May 7, 1908, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 9, 1944. He earned 3 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $120.00. Prior to becoming a Chicago Policeman Abbott was a policeman in Breedsville, Michigan.

Detective Abbott was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Dagny; children: Joanne and Louis, Jr.; parents: Clarence and Mable and sister, Mrs. Evelyn Forsyth.

In June 1962, the police department honored Detective Abbott's memory by naming the brand new M-1 police boat in the Department's Marine Unit after him.

Probationary Patrolman Thomas J. Adams Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Feb 1973
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2210
Incident Date:
26 Aug 1973
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
31
End of Watch:
26 Aug 1973
Unit of Assignment:
11th District - Fillmore
Date of Birth:
25 Nov 1941
Served:
6 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Washington Memorial Cemetery - Homewood, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 33-E: 6

Incident Details:

Probationary Patrolman Thomas J. Adams, Jr., Star #2210, aged 31 years, was a 6 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to Unit 044 - Recruit Training, detailed to the 11th District - Fillmore.

On August 26, 1973, at 4:25 a.m., Marquette District officers responded to a call of shots fired in the 3300 block of West Douglas Boulevard. Responding officers canvassed the area and during the canvass the came to 3339 West Douglas Boulevard and discovered a body on the front porch of the home. A .38 caliber revolver was found at the scene and was later identified as the murder weapon. Further investigation revealed that the body was that of Officer Adams. Adams' gun, wallet and car keys were missing. Detectives traced the weapon they found to Darryl R. "Doc" Smith, age 27, of 137 North Mayfield Avenue. According to Adams' brother, Joe, Thomas had joined the police department because of his concern over street crime in the city and had recently asked for a transfer because he felt that he was not able to fulfill his obligations as a policeman at his current post. Joe also stated that Officer Adams, while off duty, was at the Starfire Lounge at Grenshaw Street and Homan Avenue with his sister on the night of August 25, 1973. Officer Adams had pointed out two women in the lounge that he had previously arrested for prostitution. At 2:30 a.m., he was observed leaving with the two women he had pointed out according to witnesses. The women got into Adams' car and they drove away.

It was believed that Officer Adams had dropped the two women off at an unknown location and while he was driving his car he observed a disturbance at 3339 West Douglas Boulevard. When he heard gunfire, Officer Adams parked his car and ran to the scene to investigate. At this point, Darryl R. Smith, involved in the dispute pulled out a .38 caliber revolver and fired again, striking Officer Adams. He collapsed to the porch floor where he would later be found by responding officers. Officer Adams was shot three times, once to the left forearm and once to the left side of his neck, once six inches above his left hip. He was transported to Mount Sinai Hospital by beat 1370 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Yu at 4:45 a.m. on Aufgust 26, 1973.

After a manhunt, Smith surrendered to Wentworth Robbery Detectives on August 28, 1973 without incident. Smith was charged with Murder. On August 29, 1973, the charge of murder was dropped at the preliminary hearing for no probable cause.

Officer Adams was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South cottage Grove Avenue and he was laid to rest on September 1, 1973 in Washington Memorial Cemetery, 701 Ridge Road, Homewood, Illinois.

Probationary Patrolman Thomas J. Adams, Jr., born November 25, 1941, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February, 19, 1973 and was in Recruit Class 73-1C at the O'Brien Street Police Academy.

Officer Adams served in the U.S. Air Force from September 7, 1960, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Senior Airman. He was survived by his wife, Dorothy; sons: Daryl, age 4 and Mark, age 2 and parents: Ophelia (nee Price) and Thomas J., Sr.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #N376233.

On May 21, 1998, Officer Adams' star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Adams' Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Chief of Police George Abner Airey

Image Not Available
Agency:
Morgan Park Police Department
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
31 Oct 1903
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Throat Slit
Age:
59
End of Watch:
31 Oct 1903
Unit of Assignment:
Chief's Office
Date of Birth:
1844
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
022 - Morgan Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Greenwood Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 15-E: 22

Incident Details:

Chief of Police George Abner Airey, Star # Unknown, aged 59 years, was a veteran of the Morgan Park Police Department, assigned to the Chief's Office.

On October 31, 1903, Chief Airey was killed when his throat was slit while responding to a citizen complaint. The complaint involved a small group of people creating a disturbance on Halloween night. When Chief Airey arrived he observed what he believed to be a man attempting to overturn a section of wooden sidewalk by pulling it up. The man was Mrs. Hattie Payne, a women dressed in men’s clothing for Halloween. Chief Airey approached and struck Mrs. Payne with his cane. This action set off a racial storm, which had never been seen in the village. Hattie's husband, Webb Payne, her bother, Mack Wiley, age 20 and two friends became enraged. A struggle ensued and Chief Airey was attacked and his throat slit by Mack Wiley. Chief Airey bled to death at the scene.

Six suspects were arrested in connection with Chief Airey's murder. Mack Wiley was arrested in Harvey, Illinois, and taken to Morgan Park police station and was held by the Coroner. Webb Payne, alias James W., and Hattie Payne were also arrested and held as accessories. The Coroner conducted an inquest, in which a crowd of Morgan Park residents attended, which was held at the Englewood police station in Chicago. For four hours witnesses and the prisoners told their version of the murder. An effort was made to show that the crime was premeditated. Residents of Morgan Park had charged this, but close questioning failed to produce sufficient testimony to hold all the prisoners on charges of conspiring to kill. Alonzo McPhee, who had been sworn in as a special policeman for Halloween night, testified that his superior officer struggled with the men when Mrs. Hattie Payne was attempting to take his star. It was at this time, it was stated, that Wiley approached the police official from beside and stabbed him three times about the face and neck. Later the star was found in the grass at Morgan Avenue and Vincennes Road, where the struggle occurred. Aireys mutilated hat with the gold braid missing was also found nearby. Wiley did not deny his guilt, and when asked if he wished to testify offered his written confession. He then wrote his confession and it was tendered to Captain Shippy of the Chicago Police Department.

Mrs. Payne told how she had dressed in men's clothing earlier in the evening and, accompanied by three of her friends, had gone out to celebrate. She was removing boards from a sidewalk when she was accosted by Chief Airey and according to other witnesses was struck on the back by the police official when she ignored his orders. Two hours after the murder was committed. In the second meeting with the chief of police Mrs. Payne accused him of striking her and a quarrel followed, ending in the fatal stabbing of Chief Airey. At the close of the inquest the comments of those most bitter against the prisoners increased in severity until predictions were freely made that the black people in the suburb would be driven away.

Mack Wiley was indicted by the Grand Jury and stood trial. On March 25, 1904, Wiley was sentenced to death on the gallows by Judge Smith. Mrs. Hattie Payne was found guilty of manslaughter.

Chief Airey's funeral mass was held in his residence located at 1218 Church Street and he was laid to rest on November 3, 1903 in Mount Greenwood Cemetery, 2900 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Section 23, Lot 74.

Chief of Police George Abner Airey was born in 1844.

Chief Airey was survived by his wife, Sarah Frances (nee Dixon); children: Alice E., Charles Allen, Frank Fawcett and Howard William and siblings: Charles, David H., Elizabeth Catherine Airey Shipp, John William, Margerat Columbia Airey Templeton, Robert H. Sinthia F. and Virginia Airey Wise.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #40.

The Morgan Park Police Department was absorbed into the Chicago Police Department after the Village of Morgan Park was annexed in 1914.

Detective Joseph M. Airhart Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
29 Nov 1982
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
20931
Incident Date:
28 Aug 2001
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
53
End of Watch:
04 Nov 2008
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 620 - Area 2 Detectives
Date of Birth:
21 Oct 1955
Served:
25 years, 11 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Beverly Cemetery - Blue Island, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 13
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 44-E: 26

Incident Details:

Detective Joseph M. Airhart, Jr., Star #20931, aged 53 years, was a 19 year, 11 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 620 - Area 2 Detectives, detailed to the Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 606 - Central Investigations Detail.

On August 28, 2001, at 10:05 a.m., Task Force Officer Detective Airhart, member of the FBI Bank Robbery Task Force, was leading a joint party of Chicago Police Officers and FBI agents into a South Loop apartment. Located at 1307 South Wabash Avenue they were there to arrest Daniel E. Salley, age 41, a former tax preparer turned bank robber, the prime suspect in two successive armed robberies of a South Side bank.

The incident occurred in apartment #301. Detective Airhart attempted to gain entry through a ruse. He knocked on Salley's door and said he was a neighbor from apartment #307 and that some of Salley's mail had been delivered to him. Salley said he did not want it and to throw it out, then the apartment door opened and Detective Airhart waived his hand signalling the other agents to approach. Salley, saw what was going on and attempted to shut the door but Detective Airhart pressed his shoulder to the door forcing his way in. As the team entered Salley's apartment he fled into the apartment's back room and opened fire, striking Detective Airhart. Salley shot Airhart in the head, shattering the left side of his skull and penetrating his brain. For the next two hours, Salley held hostage and used Airhart as leverage with law enforcement, denying him crucial medical aid. In the exchange of gunfire Salley was shot six times, four times in the left leg and two times in the chest. Salley eventually surrendered, was taken into custody and transported to Cook County Hospital by CFD Ambulance #41. During the ride to the hospital, Salley admitted to Detective John Pellegrini, beat 5438, that he shot Detective Airhart because he knew he was a police officer. He also stated that he was interfering with his "bank robbing business." Detective Airhart was rushed to Northwestern Memorial Hospital by CFD Ambulance #28.

Detective Airhart remained in a coma for two months, but never fully recovered. He was unable to speak, walk or swallow food as a result of injuries he sustained seven years earlier. Airhart's eventual death was caused by bronchopneumonia, which was linked to the bullet wound he sustained in the shooting. He succumbed to his wounds at 1:00 p.m. on November 4, 2008.

Prior to Detective Airhart's death, the suspect, Daniel Salley, had been sentenced to life in prison plus 132 years on 14 other counts, including the attempted murder of Detective Airhart. A judge declared him incompetent to stand trial in 2003, but medical experts eventually ruled Salley was fit. Disdaining three court appointed attorneys, Salley represented himself as he had done throughout almost 5 years of legal proceedings. Attorney Richard Kling was allowed to act as his standby attorney, though the two did not consult, and Kling rarely spoke. He admitted the bank robberies, but said he didn't consider them criminal acts. Salley was eventually found guilty and sentenced to life in prison.

Detective Airhart was waked at Cage Memorial Chapel located at 7651 South Jeffery Boulevard, his funeral mass was held at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel located at 5850 South Woodlawn Avenue and he was laid to rest on November 10, 2008 in Beverly Cemetery, 12000 South Kedzie Avenue, Blue Island, Illinois.

Detective Joseph M. Airhart, Jr., born October 21, 1955, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 29, 1982. He earned 1 Superintendent's Award of Valor, 1 Hundred Club of Cook County Medal of Valor, 1 Police Blue Star Award, 2 Unit Meritorious Performance Awards, 12 Department Commendations, 83 Honorable Mentions, the 2008 Hero Award, 1 State Crime Commission Officer of the Year Award, 1 FBI Star, 1 FBI Medal of Valor8 Complimentary Letters during his career.

Detective Airhart was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his daughter, Melissa; parents: Clemmie Faye (nee Surratt) and Joseph M.; siblings: Debra, Denise and Zeddie.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #G514099 and HP665338.

Patrolman James A. Alfano Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Feb 1962
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4707
Incident Date:
13 Aug 1970
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
16 Aug 1970
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Inspectional Services - Intelligence Division: Unit 135 - Gang Intelligence Section
Date of Birth:
29 Jun 1940
Served:
8 years, 4 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 10-W: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman James A. Alfano, Jr., Star #4707, aged 30 years, was an 8 year, 4 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Inspectional Services - Intelligence Division: Unit 135 - Gang Intelligence Section.

On August 13, 1970, at 11:30 p.m., Officer James Alfano, Jr., was on duty sitting in the rear seat of unmarked squad car #3472 with his partners, Patrolmen Richard Crowley, the driver and Thomas Donahue, front passenger. The officers were driving in the area of 67th Street and Blackstone Avenue when they noticed the lights were out and the streets were dark. As they drove North through an alley behind the Southmoor Hotel located at 6646 South Stony Island Avenue. The hotel was the former Black P Stone Nation Headquarters until July, 1970. The officers encountered a blockade in the middle of the alley, a large pile of trash. Officer Crowley reversed the vehicle and then turned left into an alley between 66th Place and 67th Street and proceeded West crossing Blackstone Avenue. In the middle of the alley at approximately 1501 East they encountered a second blockade, a couch. As Officer Crowley tried to push the couch aside with the car, six to eight shots rang out. A bullet pierced the lower right rear of the trunk striking Officer Alfano on his left lower back, passing through his liver and exiting through the abdomen. He was rushed to Billings Hospital where he underwent numerous surgeries. Over 250 people donated blood in search of Alfano’s rare blood type of AB-positive. Officer Alfano survived for over 70 hours, succumbing to his injuries at 10:05 p.m. on August 16, 1970.

In the aftermath 23 people were arrested. In particular, Seven Black P Stone members were arrested in connection to Officer Alfano's murder and charged with conspiracy to commit murder: Lamar Bell, age 26; Charles Bey, age 24; Tony Carter; age 17; Dennis Griffin, age 21; Lee Jackson, age 26; William Troope, age 22 and Eton Wicks, age 22. During the trial, Black P Stone gang member, Ceasar Marsh testified that on the day of Officer Alfano's murder, two gang meetings were held. During the meetings, Edward Bell, number three in command, gave orders to break street lights and set up blockades in order to ambush gang intelligence officers. Marsh heard Bey, number two in command, tell Tony Carter to put two snipers on the ground and one on the hotel's roof. According to Marsh, he saw Carter tampering with two electrical control boxes. Coincidentally, four juveniles arrested for breaking lights told officers that the gang had ordered the area be darkened. Another witness, Ernest Williams, age 18, testified that an hour prior to the shooting he saw Bey, Carter and Jackson pushing the couch in the alley while Throope watched and held a rifle in his hand. On January 17, 1971, the seven defendants were acquitted and what followed was months of sniper shootings directed at Chicago Police Officers. In March, 1971, Cesarei Marsh, the witness, was murdered.

Officer Alfano was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, Oak Lawn, Illinois, his funeral mass was held at St. Gerald Church located at 9310 South 55th Court, Oak Lawn, Illinois and he was laid to rest on August 20, 1970 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman James A. Alfano, Jr., born June 29, 1940, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 19, 1962. He earned 28 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Alfano served in the U.S. Marine Corps for four years, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged. He was a member of the Chicago Patrolmen's Association, Confederation of Police, Italian American Police Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Judith (nee Wise); children: Jackie, Johnny and Lynne; parents: Angeline (nee Musteri) and James A., Sr. and sister, Grace.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #J344123.

Park Policeman William J. Allison

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
304
Incident Date:
15 Jun 1925
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
28
End of Watch:
23 Jun 1925
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
22 Feb 1897
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oakridge Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 15
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 21-E: 9

Incident Details:

Park Policeman William J. Allison, Star #304, aged 28 years, was a veteran of the South Park Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On June 15, 1925, Officer Allison was on duty and riding his motorcycle near Archer and Western Avenues in McKinley Park. The officer was severely injured after being pinned between two vehicles that had crashed. Officer Allison was transported to St. Anthony Hospital where he died eight days later on June 23, 1925.

Officer Allison was waked at his residence located at 2749 West 35th Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Agnes Catholic Church located at 2648 West Persing Road and he was laid to rest in Oakridge Cemetery, 4301 West Roosevelt Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Park Policeman William J. Allison was born February 22, 1897.

Officer Allison was survived by his parents: Christiana Thornton and George and siblings: George, Letty Wiot, Mary Gels and Thomas.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The South Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park district police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the South Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Theodore J. Anderson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
28 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3034
Incident Date:
23 Jul 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
23 Jul 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 2-A - Stanton
Date of Birth:
04 Sep 1898
Served:
3 years, 8 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Memorial Park Cemetery - Skokie, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 17
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 6-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Theodore J. Anderson, Star #3034, aged 27 years, was a 3 year, 8 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2-A - Stanton, Vice Squad.

On July 22, 1926, at 12:00 a.m., Officer Anderson was on foot patrol in plain clothes with his partner, Patrolman Thaddeus Coakley, working the midnight watch. The officers were on the 3100 block of South Wabash Street, where several robberies had taken place over the past few weeks, walking on opposite sides of the street. Officer Anderson observed a suspicious man, Nathaniel ”Cry Baby” Davis, alias Joseph Davis, who was lurking in front of a building at 3128 South Wabash Avenue. Anderson stopped Davis for questioning and as he searched him for concealed weapons, Davis produced a revolver. Davis fired a shot, fatally striking the officer causing him to collapse to the sidewalk, as he attempted to run away. Officer Coakley, observing what had occurred, ran across the street firing at Davis. Davis was struck and fell to the ground only a few feet away.

Officer Coakley, thinking Davis was too injured to flee, ran to assist Anderson. Coakley flagged down a taxicab and loaded Anderson into the vehicle. He instructed the cab driver to take him to the nearest hospital. The cab driver set off for Lakeside Hospital but Officer Anderson died enroute. When Officer Coakley turned his attention back to Davis, he was gone having fled the scene. He then used a call box to call for back-up.

Sergeant Albert Booth of the Detective Bureau arrived on scene after hearing of Anderson’s death and a manhunt for Davis was initiated. During the search Sergeant Booth stumbled upon a blood trail. He along with Patrolman Ignatius Sheehan followed the trail to the porch of a house on the 3100 block of South Wabash Avenue. Davis was discovered concealed underneath the front porch and was ordered out by Sergeant Booth. Instead, Davis responded opening fire narrowly missing the sergeant. Sergeant Booth returned fire killing Davis.

Officer Anderson was waked at a chapel located at 2340 West Madison Street, his funeral mass was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest in Memorial Park Cemetery, 9900 Gross Point Road, Skokie, Illinois.

Patrolman Theodore J. Anderson, born September 4, 1898, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 28, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Anderson was a Master Mason and a member of Boulevard Lodge No. 882 AF&AM and Chicago Camp No. 3052 Modern Woodman. He was survived by his wife, Henrietta and parents: Amy and Harry.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7517.

Patrolman Donald E. Andrews

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
12 Oct 1971
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
15701
Incident Date:
01 Jan 1975
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
35
End of Watch:
01 Jan 1975
Unit of Assignment:
21st District - Prairie
Date of Birth:
11 Oct 1939
Served:
3 years, 2 months, 20 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 29
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 11-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Donald E. Andrews, Star #15701, aged 35 years, was a 3 year, 2 month, 20 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 21st District - Prairie.

On January 1, 1975, at 3:27 a.m., Patrolman Donald E. Andrews, age 35 and his partner Patrolman Daniel E. Howard, age 26, were on duty working beat 210. The officers responded to a man with a gun call. Officer Andrews, driver of the squad car, was rushing to the 47th Street Station of the Dan Ryan rapid transit line to intercept two passengers carrying a shotgun. While enroute they were involved in a traffic crash with another squad car, beat 222, driven by Patrolman Edward Czoski, age 26 and Patrolman John Griffin, age 26. Both squad cars had their sirens blaring and their red lights flashing as they approached the intersection of 46th Street and Michigan Avenue. Officers Andrews and Howard were westbound on 43rd Street and entered the intersection against the red light. The second squad car entered the "blind" intersection from southbound Michigan Avenue. The impact of the collision drove both squad cars onto the sidewalk. Officers Andrews’ and Howard's vehicle rolled end over end for 40 feet, killing both officers. Officer Andrews was transported to Michael Reese Hospital by CFD Ambulance #4 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Olson at 4:08 a.m. on January 1, 1975. Officer Howard was transported to Mercy Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Maduemezia at 3:45 a.m. on January 1, 1975. The officers in the second squad car were treated and released for their injuries. The suspect was arrested by other responding officers.

Further investigation revealed that the radio broadcast of "Two men with a shotgun aboard the Elevated Train" was bonfied. Officers intercepted the train at the 47th Street Station and arrested two youths aboard the train. One, a juvenile, age 15, of 9021 South Morgan Street, was turned over to juvenile authorities. The other youth, Glen F. Childs, age 18, was charged with four offenses. One of the charges was for Unlawful Use of Weapon - Sawed Off Shotgun.

Officer Donald Andrews was waked at Czachor Funeral Home located at 3661 South Wood Street, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Good Counsel Church located at 3528 South Hermitage and he was laid to rest on January 4, 1975 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Worth, Illinois.

Patrolman Donald E. Andrews, October 11, 1939, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 12, 1971. He attended the O'Brien Street Police Academy and graduated on July 4, 1972. Officer Andrews earned 1 Honored Police Star Award (posthumously) and 8 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Andrews served in the U.S. Army from November 24, 1964 to November 11, 1965, was a veteran of the Korean and Vietnam Wars and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Specialist 5. He was a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, Chicago Patrolman's Association and the St. Jude Police League. Officer Andrews was survived by his daughter, Cara Lee, age 13; parents: Frances (nee Geiger) and Jesse and siblings: Donna Lee, Mackey, Arnold, Edmond and Michael.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #T000433 UUW Case Report and T750177 Traffic Crash Report.

On May 25, 2006, Officer Andrews' star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Detective Charles Patrick Annerino Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
1946
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7936
Incident Date:
22 Oct 1954
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
22 Oct 1954
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Division - Robbery Detail
Date of Birth:
17 Mar 1924
Served:
8 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
020 - Lincoln

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-W: 15

Incident Details:

Detective Charles Patrick Annerino, Jr., Star #7936, aged 30 years, was an 8 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Division - Robbery Detail.

On October 22, 1954, just after 12:00 am., Detective Annerino and his two partners, Detectives John Basquette and Bill Murphy, were assigned to search taverns for Augustino “Gus“ Amedeo, age 26 of 1416 North Linder Avenue, an escaped prisoner from the County Jail. Detective Annerino was assigned to the search because he knew Amedeo by sight. When Detective Annerino walked into the Circle lounge at 1756 West Lawrence Avenue Amedeo recognized the officer and shot him through the chest. Amedeo fled the lounge and was pursued by Detective Annerino's two partners and the two emptied their guns at him as he eluded them.

A manhunt for Amedeo was conducted. It was learned through investigation that Amedeo Genio, girlfriend of Anedeo, at the restaurant she worked at, Paradise Grill located at 127 North Pulaski Road. Anedeo would call between noon and 1:00 p.m., and had been doing so for the past week. Amedeo was eager to get the 1951 automobile purchased for him in Leonard Del Genio's name. The purchase was arranged October 18, 1954, but delivery was not made until after Detective Annerino's death. The Del Genio family agreed to cooperate with the police and on October 22, 1954 at 12:00 p.m. Amedeo called the diner and directed Dolly Del Genio to drive the car to Eddy and Clark Streets at 7:00 p.m. to pick him up. 25 policemen were concealed around the intersection. Amedeo used this opportunity to test Mrs. Del Genio and see whether she had notified police. He made no effort to reach the car, but neither did he observe the hidden policemen. After waiting 45 minutes she drove home.

At 1:45 p.m. the next day, Amedeo telephoned Mrs. Del Genio again. “Bring the car to Berwyn and Clark tonight,“ he said. “Have it there at 9 o'clock.“ Mrs. Del Genio drove alone to the rendezvous, but she was escorted by two cabs, a private car, and a truck, all manned be detectives in plain clothes. They converged at 9:20 p.m. on Berwyn Avenue and Clark Street. Mrs. Del Genio sat in the car, while a score of police guns were aimed at the intersection from half a dozen hiding places. Within a few minutes, Amedeo walked toward the car. Detectives Frank Schulze and Eugene Irven, stationed in a window of a nearby building, called out: “Police officers, halt.“

Irven fired a warning shot into the air. Amedeo reached for his hip pocket and started to run. Pape, standing at another window with a 30-30 caliber deer rifle, fired the first shot. It broke Amedeo's right arm and knocked him to the street. Other policemen opened fire. Amedeo raised up part way, fired two ineffective shots, then went down under a new burst of police fire. Amedeo was killed at the scene. Dr. Jerry Kearns of the Coroner's staff found an infected bullet wound in Armedeo's left arm, indicating he had been wounded in the shooting in which Detective Annerino was slain.

On June 28, 1954, Anedeo used a gun to escape from officers who were escorting him from the Cook County Court House back to the jail. His girlfriend, Mrs. Dolores Marcus, age 24 and her brother Leonard Del Genio, age 18, were later arrested for smuggling a gun to Amedeo in court which he used in his escape. She was convicted and sentenced 2 to 3 years in prison. He was convicted and sentenced to 1 to 3 years in prison. He was in jail for burglary.

Detective Annerino was waked at Michael Calcetta & Sons Funeral Home located at 2600 South Wentworth Avenue funeral mass was held at St. Jerome’s Church located at 2823 South Princton Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 26, 1954 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 87th Street and Hamlin Avenue, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Detective Charles Patrick Annerino, born March 17, 1924, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in 1946.

During Detective Annerino's eight years with the Chicago Police Department he had shot and killed three robbers and wounded four others in gunfights. Detective Annerino was promoted to Detective two months prior to his death.

Detective Annerino served in the U.S. Navy, was a veteran of World War II and he was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Illinois Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Rose Mozzotil; children, Charles P., III and Theresa; parents: Charles P., Sr. and Katherine Fineberg and siblings: August, Corinne and Eleanor.

TOWER TICKER - By Herb Lyon, Big City Vinegarette: Excerpt from the Chicago Daily Tribune, November 15, 1954

One dime, a shiny 10 cent piece doesn't buy very much these days, but a single dime COULD have saved the life of a hero cop. An ironic sidelight in the slaying of Detective Charles Annerino, by the late hood Gus Amedeo, had just come to light in November, 1954. Sure, it's OLD news now, but it sort of makes you wonder.

It happened this way: At about 11 p.m., on that fateful evening, Acting Deputy Chief of Detectives Bill Walsh and Lieutenant Jim Curtin issued an order to send a north side prowl car on a routine trip to Wilmette to pick up a murder suspect. The job was to be assigned to Car 70 carrying Detective Annerino, and his partners Bill Murphy and John Basquette.

At about two minutes after 11:00, car 70 rolled across the intersection of Western and Belmont Avenues and received orders, via the radio, to phone headquarters. Murphy wanted to stop at a drugstore and make the call, but Detective Annerino thought it would be a better idea to go to the Sheffield Avenue Station, some 18 blocks away and save the dime!

Well, as chance would have It traffic was heavy and car 70 didn't get there until over 15 minutes later. In the interim, two downtown detectives who had just come on duty were sent out on the Wilmette run. By the time Detective Annerino reached the phone and called headquarters he was told to forget the whole thing. He never did learn what the other assignment would have been even though it would have saved his life. For it was only a short while later that prowl car 70 rolled to a stop in front of a Lawrence Avenue tavern and Charley walked in to his rendezvous with fate.

If only Charley Annerino would have spent a dime on a phone call, his star wouldn't now be in a cabinet in Commissioner O'Connor's office with the grim notation. “Killed in action.“ Sure, it's OLD news now but it sort of makes you wonder.