LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

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1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Sergeant Thomas J. Babbington

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Mar 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
575
Incident Date:
21 Jan 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
44
End of Watch:
26 Jan 1925
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Bureau
Date of Birth:
22 Feb 1880
Served:
18 years, 10 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 13
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 32-E: 10

Incident Details:

Sergeant Thomas J. Babbington, Star #575, aged 44 years, was a 18 year, 10 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Bureau, Ford Squad 20-C.

On January 21, 1925, at 4:30 a.m., Sergeant Babbington entered a "soft drink" parlor at Root Street and Princeton Avenue in search for a wanted offender. As he was arresting the wanted man, several rowdy patrons attacked him. A gun battle ensued and the officer suffered five gunshot wounds. Sergeant Babbington succumbed from his wounds five days later on January 26, 1925. Before Sergeant Babbington died, he was able to identify Emmet Kearns as one of his attackers.

On February 6, 1925, Emmet Kearns was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner, who also recommended the arrest of Michael Doody as an accomplice. Shortly after, Gerald Doody, David De Coursey, George Gay, John Doody and Marie Daley were all arrested and held as accessories. One William Jones also was wanted on a Bulletin. On July 10, 1925, Michael Doody was arrested and turned over to the Cook County Sheriff. On July 16, 1925, all seven were acquitted in the Criminal Court by Judge Williams.

Sergeant Babbington was waked at his residence located at 5128 South Indiana Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Corpus Christi Church located at 4920 South Grand Boulevard (present day Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive) and he was laid to rest on January 28, 1925 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Sergeant Thomas J. Babbington, born February 22, 1880, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 22, 1900. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $180.00 during his career. On September 6, 1913, he was promoted to Desk Sergeant.

Sergeant Babbington was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Kathleen Herne; children: Thomas and William, father, Patrick and siblings: Earl, Harry, Mrs. William McDonald and Ruth.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7549.

Patrolman Joseph P. Baggott

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
06 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3125
Incident Date:
07 Jun 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
51
End of Watch:
07 Jun 1925
Unit of Assignment:
District 20 - Warren
Date of Birth:
11 Mar 174
Served:
19 years, 2 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 25-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph P. Baggott, Star #3125, aged 51 years, was a 19 year, 2 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 20 - Warren.

On June 7, 1925, at 3:55 a.m., Officer Baggott was on patrol when he was approached by a citizen, Arthur Medley, who had been shot at 2352 West Walnut Street. Medley ran to Officer Baggot for assistance, but before he could help, George Galloway, interrupted and shot Medley again striking him in the abdomen. Galloway then turned the gun on Officer Baggott shooting him in the chest just below his heart. As Baggott collapsed to the ground, he was able to draw his weapon and fire at Galloway. Galloway was struck four times and was killed instantly. Mr. Medley and Officer Baggott were taken to Washington Park Hospital. Baggott succumbed to his wounds at 9:40 a.m. the same day. Medley succumbed to his wounds the next day on June 13, 1925.

Officer Baggott was waked at a chapel located at 1158 North Clark Street, his funeral mass was held in Kilbourn, Wisconsin and he was laid to rest in Calvary Cemetery, 200-1099 Indiana Avenue, Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin.

Patrolman Joseph P. Baggott, born March 11, 1874, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 6, 1906. He earned 7 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer Baggott was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his siblings: Jerome, John, Margaret and Mary.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8541.

Police Officer Michael Ray Bailey Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Mar 1990
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
13970
Incident Date:
18 Jul 2010
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
62
End of Watch:
18 Jul 2010
Unit of Assignment:
1st District - Central
Date of Birth:
14 Aug 1947
Served:
20 years, 3 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Evergreen Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 10
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 15
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4-E: 27

Incident Details:

Police Officer Michael Ray Bailey, Sr., Star #13970, aged 62 years, was a 20 year, 3 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st District - Central.

On July 18, 2010, at 6:00 a.m., Officer Bailey had just returned home from his shift on a mayoral protection detail guarding Mayor Richard Daley's South Loop residence, and was still in uniform. He had just arrived home and was outside his Park Manor neighborhood home located at 7421 South Evans Avenue. While cleaning his new Buick Regal, an early retirement gift he had purchased, as many as three male subjects approached and attempted to rob him of his vehicle. He identified himself as a police officer and exchanged gunfire with the suspects. It is unknown whether any of the offenders were wounded. They fled the scene and remain and made good their escape. Officer Bailey was transported to Northwestern Memorial Hospital by CFD Ambulance #24 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Levine at 6:40 a.m. on July 18, 2010. Three guns, including the murder weapon, were recovered at the scene.

On July 6, 2011, Antwon Carter, age 32, was arrested and charged with Murder - First Degree for the murder of Officer Bailey. His 2011 arrest was made based on statements he made to his friends and fellow prison inmates in which he bragged about the murder of Officer Bailey. In May 2019, Carter stood trial and after a two week trial jurors deliberated for only two hours before retuning with a verdict. On May 23, 2019, Antwon Carter was found guilty during a jury trial.

Officer Bailey was waked at A.R. Leak and Sons Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue, his funeral mass was held on July 23, 2010 at St. Sabina Catholic Church located at 1210 West 78th Place, was cremated, and laid to rest in Evergreen Cemetery, 3401 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Police Officer Michael Ray Bailey, Sr., born August 14, 1947, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 26, 1990 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. Upon completion of his training he was assigned to the 1st District for his entire career. Officer Bailey was one month from retiring, and planned to retire on August 14, 2010 after reaching the mandatory retirement age of 63. He had also previously served as a fireman with the Glenview Fire Department.

Officer Bailey served in the U.S. Air Force. He was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Bailey was survived by his wife, Pamela L. (nee Mahoon); children: Danielle N. Drayton, age 36, Jada, age 23 and Michael Ray, Jr., age 27; brother; sister and 14 grandchildren.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HS416643.

On April 26, 2011, Officer Bailey's star was retired by Interim Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Curtis Ronald Baker

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Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Nov 1967
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12212
Incident Date:
02 Jun 1984
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
45
End of Watch:
02 Jun 1984
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Special Operations Group: Unit 701 - Public Transportation Section
Date of Birth:
30 Aug 1938
Served:
16 years, 6 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, line 40
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 34-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Curtis Ronald Baker, Star #12212, aged 45 years, was a 16 year, 6 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Special Operations Group: Unit 701 - Public Transportation Section Tactical Unit.

On June 2, 1984, at 1:40 a.m., Officer Baker was off duty and in plainclothes when he was escorting a woman to her apartment in the Robert Taylor Homes at 4500 South Federal Street. Three men, Bernard Lash, age 19, of 4500 South State Street, David Govan, age 24, of 4500 South State Street and Eugene Jackson, age 19, of 4500 South State Street, trailed the pair when one shouted “stickup.“ The incident occurred in the 4th floor stairwell. Officer Baker drew his gun from its holster but was shot by Lash before he could fire his weapon. All three offenders fled without taking anything. Officer Baker sustained a gunshot wound to the chest, the bullet perforating the heart and liver. He was transported to Michael Reese Hospital by CFD Ambulance #35 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Alverdi at 2:00 a.m. on June 2, 1984.

Bernard Lash, David Govan and Eugene Jackson were later identified and charged with murder and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. All three were ordered held without bond.

Officer Baker was waked at th House of Branch Funeral Home located at 3125 West Roosevelt Road, his funeral mass was held at Emmanuel Baptist Church located at 8301 South Damen Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 7, 1986 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Curtis Ronald Baker, born August 30, 1938, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 13, 1967.

Officer Baker served in the Armed Forces from 1961 to 1963 and was Honorably Discharged. He was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Baker was survived by his wife, Patricia Elaine (nee Box) and children: Keith LaMar, age 16 and Kimberly LaShawn, age 18.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #F198923.

Patrolman Leonard Frank Baldy

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
21 Sep 1953
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1451
Incident Date:
02 May 1960
Cause of Death:
Crash - Helicopter
Age:
33
End of Watch:
02 May 1960
Unit of Assignment:
Traffic Division - Public Safety Education Bureau
Date of Birth:
15 Feb 1927
Served:
6 years, 7 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 6
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 36-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph Edward Chapman, Jr., Star #6239, aged 57 years, was a 31 year, 3 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Crime Prevention Division - Youth Bureau, detailed to the Motion Picture Section.

On May 8, 1960, at 3:00 p.m., Officer Chapman, while off duty, was at the Hi-Spot Liquor Store located at 5302 South Indiana Avenue. Officer Chapman went to visit with the owner, Herman Baum who was a personal friend, and to buy some soft drinks for his grandchildren who were coming to his home for a Mother's Day party. Officer Chapman and Baum were eating lunch in the store and after consuming the food and soda, Officer Chapman remained in the store visiting. At 4:45 p.m. Officer Chapman went to the rear of the store to use the washroom. Baum remained out front when Larry C. Harvey, age 26 of New Haven, Connecticut, entered and walked to the rear counter. Baum noticed a gun in Harvey's hand as he vaulted the counter announcing, “This is a stick-up,“ pointing the gun at Baum and his clerk, Sterling Bitting. At this time, Officer Chapman heard the commotion and came out from the back of the store and announced his office. Harvey responded by shooting and a gun battle ensued. Harvey fired at Officer Chapman three times from close range. Officer Chapman was struck in the stomach and as he fell he was shot two more times striking him in the left leg and left foot. Officer Chapman returned fire as he fell hitting Harvey five times. Harvey was shot in his left arm, left thigh, and groin. Officer Chapman was transported to Provident Hospital by Squadrol 287 where he underwent surgery. He passed away during surgery and was pronounced dead by Dr. Small at 5:00 p.m. on May 8, 1960. Larry Harvey was also transported to Provident Hospital where he was treated. He was later transferred to the Bridewell Hospital where he died at 1:30 a.m. on May 9, 1960.

Officer Chapman was waked at Crook Funeral Home located at 4638 South Indiana Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Martin's Episcopal Church located at 5842 South Princeton Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 12, 1960 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph Edward Chapman, Jr., born June 3, 1903, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 2, 1929. Officer Chapman was scheduled to retire on July 2, 1960. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. Ironically, the Credible Mention was awarded for a gun fight Chapman had on March 4, 1956 in the same liquor store where he was slain. Officer Chapman served in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 19th, and 27th Districts, Headquarters, Morals Division, and the Crime Prevention Division during his career.

Officer Chapman was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Francis (CPD), age 53 and daughters: Carol, Doris, Frances, Frederica, Josephine and Pauline.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department Accident Report No. 730476-7, Central Complaint Room No. 43961 and Station Complaint No. 796276. Incident disseminated via Teletype Message No. 25776 and 257789

In January, 1961, Officer Chapman's star was retired by Superintendent Orlando W. Wilson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Chapman's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

In June 1962, the police department honored Officer Chapman's memory by naming the brand new M-6 police boat in the Department's Marine Unit after him.

Canine Handler Frank T. Balzano

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Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Feb 1958
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
10528
Incident Date:
13 Nov 1997
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Blunt Trauma
Age:
65
End of Watch:
14 Nov 1997
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 050 - Canine Bomb Detection Unit
Date of Birth:
08 Sep 1932
Served:
39 years, 8 months, 29 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
Norridge, IL

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Elm Lawn Cemetery - Elmhurst, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Canine Handler Frank T. Balzano, Star #10528, aged 65 years, was a 39 year, 8 month, 29 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 050 - Canine Bomb Detection Unit.

On November 13, 1997, Officer Balzano was working as a part time security guard at the Harlem and Irving Plaza in Norridge. Officer Balzano attempted to break up a fight between two teenage girls when one of the girls, Amy Landers, 16, called out to her boyfriend, Zbigniew “Ziggy” Krzeckowski, age 16, for help. Krzeckowski punched the officer in the face causing him to fall to the ground and hit his head. Officer Balzano was transported to Resurrection Medical Center where he died the next morning on November 14, 1997.

Landers was arrested and charged with 1st degree murder. Krzeckowski was also arrested and charged as a juvenile with aggravated battery. In 2000, both Krzeckowski and Landers later pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter. Landers was sentenced to 3 years’ probation, including 1 year of intensive anger management counseling. Krzeckowski was sentenced to 4 years in prison.

Officer Balzano was waked at Olson Funeral Home located at 6467 North Northwest Highway, his funeral mass was also held at Olson Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on November 16, 1997 in Elm Lawn Cemetery, 401 East Lake Street, Elmhurst, Illinois.

Canine Handler Frank T. Balzano, born September 8, 1932, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 16, 1958. He was planning to retire in six weeks at the time of his death.

Officer Balzano served in the U.S. Army and was a veteran of the Korean War. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police, a Master Mason and a Noble of the Medinah Shrine Temple member of the Black Horse Troop. He was survived by his wife, Jean; children: Cathy, Daniel and Frank, Jr.; mother, Louise Nelson; two brothers, sister and grandchildren.

Patrolman George Thomas Barker

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
175
Incident Date:
13 Mar 1932
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
13 Mar 1932
Unit of Assignment:
35th District - East Chicago
Date of Birth:
01 May 1896
Served:
9 years, 4 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 32
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-W: 15

Incident Details:

Patrolman George Thomas Barker, Star #175, aged 35 years, was a 9 year, 4 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 35th District - East Chicago.

On March 13, 1932, at 1:40 a.m., Officer Barker, while off duty, was on medical leave after being shot in front of his home after resisting a robbery attempt in July, 1931. Officer Barker was at the restaurant of Irving Grossman’s, a “Soda Parlor,” located at 1438 West Madison Street. He was there celebrating the 13th wedding anniversary of his friends James and Helen Bingley while also in the company of actresses Sue Ross and Wilma Thompson. They were all at the bar in the back of the restaurant with Mr. Grossman when the two armed bandits entered, announcing an armed robbery. When Officer Barker confronted the offenders, a gun battle ensued. Officer Barker was able to prevent the robbery firing three rounds at the bandits before he was fatally wounded in the incident. Officer Barker was shot in chest and abdomen and was rushed to Cook County Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds later the same day. For some unknown reason, Officer Barker identified himself as Joe Anson before giving his real name once at the hospital.

A doctor who had a practice near the restaurant reported that two men entered his office shortly after the shooting seeking medical attention for gunshot wounds. When he informed the men that he would have to call police to report the injuries, the men left the office. The men were later identified as Nick Konemogloos, alias Nick or John Petros and Charles L. Hughes. On January 20, 1933, Konemogloos was identified in New York City and was extradited back to Chicago by State’s Attorney Officers to stand trial for murder. He was found guilty and on May 8, 1993 he was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Konemogloos died in prison while serving his sentence in the 1960's. It is unknown if Hughes was ever arrested for his part in the crime.

Officer Barker was waked at his residence located at 2816 West Arthington Street, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Sorrows Basilica located at 3121 West Jackson Boulevard and he was laid to rest on March 17, 1932 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman George Thomas Barker, born May 1, 1896, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 26, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Barker was survived by his wife, Myrtle (nee Sennott); children: Dorothy and George and siblings: Frank F. and Raymond J.

Patrolman Cornelius “Connie” Barrett

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
31 Jul 1882
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
63
Incident Date:
31 May 1885
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
31 May 1885
Unit of Assignment:
1st Precinct - Harrison Street Station
Date of Birth:
1851
Served:
2 years, 10 months, 0 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-W: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Cornelius "Connie" Barrett, Star #63, aged 34 years, was a 2 year, 10 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st Precinct - Harrison Street Station.

On May 31, 1885, A fateful course of events led to the death of Officer Barrett. Just before noon, the railway policeman on duty at the Polk Street station called upon Lieutenant Laughlin of the Chicago Police Department, stationed at the Harrison Street Station. The railway policeman showed the lieutenant a dispatch he had received, it read as follows:

”CHENOA, May 31, 1885. – Depot Policeman, Chicago: I have an insane man on my train who has possession of one car. Policemen at Kansas City, Jacksonville, and Peoria all afraid to take him. Please send ten or twelve policemen out on No. 1 to take him when we arrive in Chicago. They had better come in citizens’ clothes, and will have to look sharp or some will get hurt. PUTNAM, Conductor No. 6”

The suspect, Lewis Reaume, age 33, boarded the train in Kansas City, was drunk and went among passengers asking them to drink with him. When they refused he became a raving maniac, produced a .44 caliber Colt revolver, and ran everyone from the car he was in. Under the idea that he was being pursued by a lynch mob, he shot at everyone whom he saw, seriously wounding a passenger agent.

Lieutenant Laughlin remarked that he thought it was the duty of the railway policemen to arrest the man and asked the railway officer why he did not go to the station. He responded, “I can’t get away.” The lieutenant then asked, “Will you go down with us?” The railway policeman said, “I can’t, but I will send a janitor with you.” Seeing that there was no assistance to be had from the railway police, the lieutenant dismissed the officer. The Lieutenant then sent a dispatch to the Town of Lake Police Department, knowing the train to be coming through their town before it reached Chicago. The reply from them was of no help as well, they replied, “We haven’t any officers; they have gone to a picnic.”

The lieutenant now agitated with none too credible reflections about the courage of out of town policemen, took the case in hand. A squad of twelve officers was selected and left the station at 2:15 p.m. to meet the train. The train was scheduled to arrive at the Polk Street Station in the Union Depot at 2:30 p.m. The depot was situated between 3rd Avenue (present day Plymouth Court) and 4th Avenue (present day Federal Street). The squad consisted of Lieutenant Laughlin, Detectives Amstien, Ferry and O’Brien, and Patrolmen Barrett, Casey, Cox, Dohney, Keovan, Murphy, Rowan and Ryan. The patrolmen were in uniform while the other officers were in plainclothes. To attract less attention the detail separated into squads of two and three officers. Accompanying the officers was a reporter from the Chicago Daily Tribune.

Once at the train station the officers chatted and planned their course of attack passing the time. The depot policeman notified Lieutenant Laughlin that the train was running late and would not arrive until 3:35 p.m. The ticket agent then informed the lieutenant that the crazy man on the train was not armed, but that he had broken the shackles that had secured his hands and was using the shackles as a weapon. The lieutenant remarked, “O, well, if he has no other weapons we can overpower him easily enough. I feel relieved.” It wasn’t long before a telegram came from Western Indiana Junction which said that the crazy man was armed and that officers should be cautious as the man was desperate.

News that a maniac had taken over a train spread and crowds of people began to fill the train depot. At exactly 3:35 p.m. a long whistle and shouts of “Here she comes!” spread through the depot, the train was now rounding a curve. As the train pulled into the station, the engineer blew a series of short whistles. The door to baggage car opened and men started leaping out warning the people to get out of the way. Before the train came to a complete stop, men and women scarred for their lives leapt from the train. The officers, now stationed on both sides of the track moved towards the rear, staying close to the cars as they went. At 3:45 p.m. Officer Barrett and Keenan were on the east side the train and were just about to reach the train car when they heard a loud report. Almost immediately Officer Barrett grabbed Officer Keenan and clutched his breast. As he collapsed to the platform he gasped and said, “I’m shot.” These were the last words he ever spoke and died shortly thereafter. Reaume had fired through the train’s door, the bullet striking Officer Barrett in the left breast and then exiting between the shoulders. Immediately following the first shot, all the officers leveled their pistols at the train car and began firing on the crazy man.

Reaume, shot once by Lieutenant Laughlin, jumped from the train car and ran northbound on the platform brandishing his gun. Reaching the front of the train, he then fled westbound crossing the tracks and headed for 4th Avenue (present day Federal Street). The police gave chase with Lieutenant Laughlin at Reaume’s heels. Once Reaume reached 4th Avenue he turned and rested his pistol on his left arm taking aim at Lieutenant Laughlin who was now twenty feet away. Reaume pulled the trigger, but the gun didn’t discharge. Reaume had spent all his ammunition. Seeing this the lieutenant didn’t fire his gun and rushed toward him. Realizing he was now surrounded, Reaume ran back towards the train depot. As he reached the west track in the depot, Lieutenant Laughlin tackled him. The two men struggled and Reaume struck the lieutenant in the head with his pistol several times. The lieutenant yelled, “take the gun away!” and Officer Rowen grabbed the gun from Reaume. It was at this time that John Klein, a citizen, ran up and yelled, “Kill the fuck!” Mistaking the lieutenant for Reaume he hit him over the head with a large brick. The lieutenant sustained a serious gash to his head from the brick in addition to the cuts from Reaume’s pistol strikes. Before Mr. Klein could inflict more damage, he was stopped by the other officers’ onscene. Reaume was taken into custody and loaded into the patrol wagon, which took him to the Armory. Officer Barrett was loaded into a second patrol wagon and taken to the station.

Almost 150 rounds were fired in the incident. Although critically wounded, Lieutenant Laughlin eventually recovered from his injuries. John Klein was arrested and convinced that his actions were sincere; Lieutenant Laughlin released him. Lewis Reaume sustained three gunshots in the back and was critically wounded eventually recovering from his wounds. On July 9, 1885, he was declared insane, and sent to the insane asylum in Elgin, Michigan.

Officer Barrett was waked at his residence located at No. 33 Wesson Street (present day Cambridge Avenue), his funeral mass was held at Holy Name Church and he was laid to rest on June 2, 1885 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Cornelius "Connie" Barrett, born in 1851, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 31, 1882.

Officer Barrett was survived by his sister.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman John J. Barrett

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Jan 1885
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
557
Incident Date:
04 May 1886
Cause of Death:
Explosion - Bomb
Age:
25
End of Watch:
06 May 1886
Unit of Assignment:
3rd Precinct - Desplaines Street Station
Date of Birth:
1862
Served:
1 year, 3 months, 21 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 40-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman John J. Barrett, Star #557, aged 25 years, was a 1 year, 3 month, 21 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to 3rd Precinct - Desplaines Street Station.

On May 4, 1886, Officer Barrett was with other officers assigned to disperse protesters near Haymarket Square. A bomb was thrown and exploded amidst officers. The explosion was followed by an intense gun battle. Patrolman Barrett was shot through the liver and sustained serious wounds to the head, side and shoulder due to a bomb explosion. Patrolman Barrett was taken to Cook County Hospital where he died two days later at 11:55 a.m. on May 6, 1886. He was the second of eight officers killed in the historic Haymarket Tragedy.

Eight men were arrested and charged with the officers’ murders. Seven were convicted of murder and sentenced to death. The other one was sentenced to 15 years in prison. On November 11, 1887, four of them were executed by hanging. The day before one of the suspects killed himself in his cell with a smuggled dynamite cap, which he detonated in his mouth. The other three were pardoned by Governor John P. Altgeld in 1893.

Nine police officers died after or were killed during the Haymarket Riot labor dispute. The officers were at the scene of a civil disorder when the rioters opened fire and threw a bomb into the crowd. Seven policemen suffered fatal wounds, two policemen suffered serious injury which would later lead to their death and 70 other people were injured by the explosion and ensuing gunfire.

The officers who were killed in or as a result of the Haymarket Riot, in order of their death, include:

  • Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, End of Watch May 4, 1886
  • Patrolman John J. Barrett, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman George F. Miller, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, End of Watch May 8, 1886
  • Patrolman Michael Sheehan, End of Watch May 9, 1886
  • Patrolman Nels Hansen, End of Watch May 14, 1886
  • Patrolman Thomas Redden, End of Watch May 16, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy O'Sullivan, End of Watch June 14, 1888
  • Patrolman Patrick Hartford, End of Watch November 26, 1897

Officer Barrett was waked at his residence, his funeral mass was held at St. Stephen's Church and he was laid to rest on May 9, 1886 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman John J. Barrett, born in 1862, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 15, 1885.

Officer Barrett was survived by his wife, Annie (nee Walpole); mother; brother and three sisters.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #97 and Case #2743.

In response to the tragic events of May 4, 1886 a commemorative nine-foot (2.7 meter) bronze statue of a Chicago policeman was commissioned to honor the sacrifice of the policemen who lost their lives that fateful night. The statue was designed by Frank Batchelder of St. Paul Minnesota in 1889 and sculpted by sculptor Johannes Gelert of New York, New York. The statue's marble pedestal was ordered to have an inscription on it. The inscription is the command that Captain William Ward delivered in the Haymarket just before the bomb was thrown that fateful night: “In the name of the People of Illinois, I command peace.“ The statue was funded by private funds raised by the Union League Club of Chicago. The statue would become the first known monument erected in the United States honoring policemen. Erected in the middle of Haymarket Square located on Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, the statue was unveiled on May 30, 1889. The unveiling was conducted by Frank Degan, the son of Officer Mathias Degan who was killed in the Haymarket Affair. Over the years the statue would be moved seven times, it would also be repaired and rebuilt several times due to vandalism.

  • Location #1 - Haymarket Square (May 30, 1889 thru July, 1900): Haymarket Square was the first location in which the statue would be erected. It was placed in the middle of Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, as seen in the image above. The statue interfered with the flow of traffic in this busy area, and it became an object of vandalism. As a result, it was moved in 1900 about one mile west, to Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue, near Union Park.

  • Location #2 - Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue (July, 1900 thru 1928): The statue remained at its second location for just over 27 years. A medallion, which is evident in the photo above, is located just above the inscription. Also visible are two white dots just below the inscription. Those two dots are of the original mounting holes for the medallion. It is believed that due to vandalism, the medallion was moved higher up the monuments pedestal. On May 4, 1927, the 41st anniversary of the Haymarket affair, a Chicago Surface Lines streetcar jumped its tracks and crashed into the statue's pedestal. The force of the crash dislodged the statue from the pedestal and the statue fell over falling off the base. The motorman, William Schultz, of the streetcar stated that the brakes failed as he was rounding the corner. He also later said that he was “sick of seeing that policeman with his arm raised.“ The city restored the statue in 1928 and moved the pedestal and statue into nearby Union Park.

  • Location #3 - Union Park (1928 thru June 2, 1957): The monument was located near Washington Boulevard on the North side of the street facing south and it remained in Union Park for nearly three decades. The finials, which flank the pedestal, had been modified after one of the monument's earlier moves. This change is believed to be the result of vandal damage or from being stripped at various times. During the 1950's, construction of the Kennedy Expressway erased about half of the old, run-down Haymarket Square Area, and on June 2, 1957, the statue was moved to Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway.

  • Location #4 - Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway (June 2, 1957 thru February 5, 1972): The Statue was situated on the north side of Randolph Street a block west of Desplaines Street at 700 West Randolph Street, just to the east of the new Kennedy Expressway. A new platform was built to support the pedestal and statue overlooking the expressway, only 200 feet from its original location. After years of vandalism the pedestal was badly stained and chipped as can be seen in the photo above.

    On May 4, 1968, The Haymarket statue was vandalized with black paint, the 82nd anniversary of the Haymarket affair, following a confrontation between police and demonstrators at a protest against the Vietnam War. The city named the monument a historic landmark in the mid-1960’s, but this did not prevent further vandalism, presumably in protest against police brutality in the context of opposition to the Vietnam War and social inequality in the United States. On October 6, 1969, in what was almost certainly a deliberate symbolic reenactment of the original Haymarket meeting, someone placed a powerful explosive between the legs of the statue, blowing out about a hundred windows nearby and sending chunks of the statue's legs onto the expressway below. Weather Underground members, known as Weatherman, took credit for the blast and battled police elsewhere in the streets of Chicago over several days. The statue was rebuilt and unveiled on May 4, 1970.

    The statue was repaired, but early on the morning of October 5, 1970, it was blown up again. The body of the statue badly bent a nearby railing as it fell before settling on the expressway embankment, and one of the legs landed two hundred feet away. Immediately after the blast, a person or persons called various news outlets to declare that the bombing was the work of the Weathermen. According to one newspaper, the caller said, “We just blew up Haymarket Square Statue for the second year in a row to show our allegiance to our brothers in the New York prisons and our black brothers everywhere. This is another phase of our revolution to overthrow our racist and fascist society. Power to the People.“ The two attacks on the police statue were among several politically-motivated bombings throughout the country at the time.

    An angry and determined Mayor Richard J. Daley had the statue repaired again and put under 24 police protection. On February 5, 1972, the statue was moved to the State Street Chicago Police Headquarters Building. The pedestal remained at this location for 24 more years and was finally removed in 1996. It is unknown whether the pedestal was scrapped or placed into storage by the city.

  • Location #5 - State Street Chicago Police Headquarters (February 5, 1972 thru October 5, 1976): On February 5, 1972, the statue was placed on a new marble pedestal located in the lobby of the State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building at 1121 South State Street. The statue remained on display in the headquarters lobby for four years and eight months. On October 5, 1976, the statue was then relocated to the new Chicago Police Training Academy. The State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building has since been razed and a new commercial and residential complex was built in its place.

  • Location #6 - Chicago Police Training Academy (October 5, 1976 thru June 1, 2007): On October 5, 1976, the statue was moved from the Old Chicago Police Headquarters Building and placed on a new granite pedestal, located in a secure outdoor courtyard at the Chicago Police Training Academy located at 1300 West Jackson Street for twenty years.

  • Location #7 - Michigan Avenue Chicago Police Headquarters (June 1, 2007 thru Present): On June 1, 2007 the statue was rededicated at Chicago Police Headquarters located at 3501 South State Street and placed on a new pedestal. The rededication unveiling was conducted by Geraldine Doceka, Officer Mathias Degan's great-granddaughter. The statue currently resides at this location.

Patrolman Edward Lester Barron

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Mar 1970
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
14571
Incident Date:
28 Sep 1973
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
28 Sep 1973
Unit of Assignment:
4th District - South Chicago
Date of Birth:
01 Dec 1937
Served:
3 years, 6 months, 26 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 27
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward Lester Barron, Star #14571, aged 35 years, was a 3 year, 6 month, 26 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th District - South Chicago.

On September 28, 1973, at 2:00 p.m., Officer Barron was working beat 460 with his partner, Patrolman Daniel P. Abate, age 31, and assisting Patrolman Keith Grabowski. The officers responded to a call of a robbery in progress at 8005 South Kingston Avenue. Joseph Bigsby, age 16, had just robbed and pistol-whipped one of two elderly victims who were walking their dog. Mr. Lewis Little, age 67, robbery victim, stated that Bigsby robbed him of 55 cents and then returned 25 cents saying, "I can't do anything with that." The second victim was robbed of an unknown amount of money and left the scene without being identified. First to arrive on the scene was Sergeant Mitchel, who after seeing Bigsby ordered him to stop but he turned and fled. The sergeant fired a shot and put out a flash message for Bigsby. Another Sergeant, Anthony Norka, located Bigsby at 7059 South Kingston Avenue and exchanged gunfire with him. Bigsby continued to flee when he was located in a gangway at 7958 South Colfax Avenue by Officer Barron and his partner. Bigsby responded by drawing a Luger pistol, which was used in the robberies and again exchanged gunfire with the officers, striking Officer Barron below the right eye, the bullet lodging at the base of the skull, killing him instantly. Officer Abate returned fire, striking Bigsby, and he went down. It was at that time that Officer Abate saw Officer Barron go down. Officer Abate retreated to his squad car and radioed the task force and then reentered the yard with Officer Grabowski. Bigsby was captured in the rear yard at 7958 South Colfax Avenue and sustained a gunshot wound to his left calf during the chase. Officer Barron was transported to South Shore Hospital by beat 470 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Chato at 2:20 p.m. on September 28, 1973.

Bigsby was taken to Burnside police headquarters and was identified by Mr. Little and two other witnesses as the offender. Bigsby was held on a juvenile petition and was later charged and on May 29, 1975 convicted of Murder, three counts of attempt murder and two counts of armed robbery. In September 1973, Bigsby was sentenced to serve 270 years in prison. On June 19, 2013, Bigsby became eligible for parole and had his hearing. On June 27, 2013 the parole board denied Bigsby's request for parole. Bigsby became eligible for parole again in 2015. On June 25, 2015, Bigsby was granted parole in an 8 to 7 vote by the Illinois Parole Board.

Officer Barron was waked at Lain & Son Chapel located at 2121 West 95th Street, his funeral mass was held at St. George Roman Catholic Church located at 9546 South Ewing Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 2, 1973 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Edward Lester Barron, born December 1, 1937, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 2, 1970. He earned 1 Superintendent's Award of Valor (poshumously) and 5 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer Barron served in the U.S. Air Force from January 6, 1955 to January 5, 1963, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Airman Second Class. He was a member of Chicago Patrolman's Association, Confederation of Police, Illinois Police Association, St. Jude Police League, and the Trinity Council No. 3755 Knights of Columbus. Officer Barron was survived by his wife, Nancy Jo (nee Balogh); children: Linda, age 13 and Paul, age 14; mother, Ethel (nee Klefisch) and siblings: Carol Stipanich, Joan Anderson, John T., Lovila McGlashan, Ronald W., Willene Montez and Reverend Wayne J. Barron of the St. Jude Police League.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #N432292 and N432310.

On May 21, 1998, Officer Barron's star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Barron's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Commander Paul R. Bauer

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Jul 1986
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
29
Incident Date:
13 Feb 2018
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
53
End of Watch:
13 Feb 2018
Unit of Assignment:
18th District - Near North
Date of Birth:
17 Nov 1964
Served:
31 years, 6 months, 30 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 25
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 61-W: 31

Incident Details:

Commander Paul R. Bauer, Star #29, aged 53 years, was a 31 year, 6 month, 30 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 18th District - Near North.

On February 13, 2017, at approximately 1:40 p.m., a 1st District tactical team observed a suspicious subject, Shomari Legghette, at State Street and Lower Wacker Drive. In response to a shooting at 35 East Lower Wacker Drive the week prior, officers were saturating the area to combat drug sales, which sparked the shooting. The officers attempted to make contact with Legghette for a field interview when he fled on foot. A foot pursuit followed and a description of Legghette was broadcast over Zone 4 radio. The pursuing officers lost sight of Legghette at Lake and State Streets and relayed the message over the radio. One of the pursuing officers cautioned responding units to not get hurt, the offender was only wanted for a field interview.

Commander Bauer had just attended a training session within the vicinity of the Thompson Center and minutes before he was due to head to a meeting at City Hall he monitored the radio call. The Commander spotted a man matching the description of the suspect at 161 North Clark Street and gave chase across Clark Street into the Thompson Center Plaza located at 100 West Randolph Street. Commander Bauer confronted Legghette in the plaza near the top of the Food Court’s East emergency exit stairs. A struggle ensued and Legghette pulled the Commander down the stairs. Shortly after the fall Legghette produced a semi-automatic handgun with a thirty round magazine. Legghette stood over the Commander and fired seven rounds. The Commander was struck six times in the head, neck, torso, back and wrist. Legghette then attempted to make good his escape, but was arrested at the top of the staircase by responding officers. Due to the commotion, it wasn’t immediately known that the Commander was shot. An officer inspecting the staircase found him a few minutes later. His body was lying just out of sight from the top of the staircase, his weapon still holstered, and his radio and handcuffs lying next to his body. An ambulance was summoned and Commander Bauer was transported to Northwestern Memorial Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Shortly after the arrest of Legghette he was found to have been wearing a bullet proof vest and was transported to Area Central Headquarters for further investigation. Further investigation revealed Surveillance video that captured the struggle and three civilian witnesses identified Legghette in a lineup as the man who struggled with Bauer at the top of a stairwell. Legghette was charged with First Degree Murder, Possession of Less Than 15 Grams Heroin and Possession of a Firearm by Felon. During his bond hearing on February 14, 2018 Judge Mary Marubio ordered Legghette held without bond. On March 13, 2020, a jury returned a verdict of guilty and Legghette was convicted of 1st Degree Murder.

Commander Bauer was the first officer, the rank of Commander, to be killed in the line of duty. He also had a cousin, Patrolman Martin Emmett Darcy, Jr., who was also fatally shot in the line of duty on September 27, 1982.

Commander Bauer was waked at Nativity of Our Lord Church located at 653 West 37th Street, his funeral mass was also held at Nativity of Our Lord Church and he was laid to rest on February 17, 2018 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Commander Paul R. Bauer, born November 17, 1964, received his Probationary Appointment to the Department on July 14, 1986 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Carter H. Harrison Medal (posthumously), 32 Honorable Mentions, 3 Attendance Recognition Awards, the 2009 Crime Reduction Award, the 2004 Crime Reduction Award, the NATO Summit Service Award, 1 Presidential Election Deployment Award, 1 Democratic Convention Service Award, 18 Complimentary Letters, 1 Appearance Award and 7 Physical Fitness Awards during his career. Commander Bauer was promoted to Sergeant in 1994, Lieutenant in August 2005, Captain on May 1, 2015 and to Commander on June 25, 2016.

Commander Bauer was survived by his wife, Erin (nee Molloy); daughter, Grace, age 13; parents, Annette and Paul and siblings, Jane (Chris) Schuleit, Pam (Andy) Howell and Sue (Frank) March.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #JB150650.

On February 17, 2018, Mayor Rahm Emmanuel announced that the new joint Chicago Fire and Police Academy located on the 4300 block of West Chicago Avenue, which will begin construction in late 2018, will be named the Paul R. Bauer Academy.

On September 25, 2018, Commander Bauer's star was retired by Superintendent Eddie T. Johnson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Dec 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
881
Incident Date:
30 Oct 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
47
End of Watch:
31 Oct 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 9 - Kensington
Date of Birth:
03 Oct 1879
Served:
18 years, 10 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Cedar Park Cemetery - Calumet Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 11-W: 11

Incident Details:

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley, Star #881, aged 47 years, was an 18 year, 10 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 9 - Kensington.

On October 30, 1926, Detectives from the Kensington station were searching the area for a notorious car thief, Timothy Hennessy, who was a known member of an organized gang of auto thieves. At 2:15 p.m., Sergeant Beardsley and his partner, Sergeant Andrew Harrah, located Hennessy’s cohorts, Stanley Gracyas and Henry Perry, in a garage located at 312 West 116th Street. Gracyas and Perry were attempting to transport a stolen car being temporarily stored in the garage that was recently rented by Hennessy. The sergeants were able to safely arrest Gracyas, but Perry was able to escape. Sergeant Harrah went back to the scene to investigate the garage and Gracyas’ rooming house while Sergeant Beardsley dealt with Gracyas. Once Gracyas was alone with Beardsley, he pulled out a concealed revolver and fired at Beardsley. Gracyas then jumped into an automobile with Hennessey and escaped. As they were escaping, Sergeant James J. O'Brien appeared. O’Brien exchanged gunfire with Gracyas as they made good their escape and was struck by a bullet in the right hand. Officer Beardsley succumbed to his wounds the next day on October 31, 1926.

After an extensive manhunt, Henry Perry was located and arrested a block away. On December 7, 1926, the Coroner recommended the arrest of Gracyas as the principal and Tim Hennessey as an accessory and held Henry Perry as an accessory. On February 8, 1927, Gracyas was apprehended, brought back from Colorado and turned over to the Sheriff. Hennessy was also arrested and charged with accessory to murder. On April 15, 1927, Hennessey's and Perry's cases were stricken off the record by Judge Sullivan.

Sergeant Beardsley’s funeral service was held at Carson’s Morgue located at 119th Street and Stewart Avenue and he was laid to rest in Cedar Park Cemetery, 12540 South Halsted Street, Calumet Park, Illinois.

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley, born October 3, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 23, 1907. He earned 5 Credible Mentions during his career. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915. On June 28, 1921, he was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Beardsley was a Master Mason. He was survived by his wife, father and brother.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7646.

On September 14, 1928, Patrolman James J. O'Brien would be shot in the line of duty dying two days later on September 16, 1928.

Patrolman William Y. Bell

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
17 Jun 1964
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3565
Incident Date:
06 Feb 1967
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly
Age:
25
End of Watch:
06 Feb 1967
Unit of Assignment:
2nd District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
12 May 1941
Served:
2 years, 7 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 27-E: 10

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Y. Bell, Star #3565, aged 25 years, was a 2 year, 7 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 2nd District - Wabash.

On February 6, 1967, Officer Bell, while off duty and in plain clothes, assisted several police officers involved in the pursuit of a robbery suspect. Officer Bell had parked his car with the motor running and had gone inside a laundry located at 1653 East 71st Street. He approached Patrolmen Elkstrom and Walker and identified himself as an off duty police officer. Moments earlier, the manager from a grocery store had alerted Officer Elkstrom of a robbery as he was writing parking tickets. The three officers began to chase William Baird, age 27. Baird had just robbed the Jewel Tea Company supermarket located at 1709 East 71st Street, taking $1,200.00 in currency. Another officer, Patrolman Reynolds, who had radioed in the report of the robbery, gave chase in his squad car unaware that Bell was a policeman. As Officer Reynolds gave chase, Baird opened fire as he hid in a building vestibule located at 1647 East 69th Street firing at Patrolmen James Knightly and Patrick O'Brien with a .45 caliber revolver. A fierce gun battle ensued and Officers Knightly and O'Brien returned fire, firing into the vestibule where Baird was holdup. Officer Knightly was shot in his chest and leg. Officer O’Brien sustained several bullet holes in his jacket and a superficial gunshot wound. During the gun battle, Officer Bell took cover in a snowdrift near the building where Baird was holdup and had also fired several shots at Baird. Officer Reynolds arrived on scene and peered around a corner of a building with only his blue jacketed arm showing and observed Officer Bell firing. Reynolds yelled "Hold it" and Bell turned around and fired several shots at Reynolds thinking he was another holdup man. Reynolds, not knowing Bell was a policemen, then returned fire hitting Bell three times thinking he was Baird’s accomplice. Baird was killed in the shootout and the money taken from the store was recovered.

Officer Bell was waked at Ernest Griffin Funeral Home, his funeral mass was held at Olivet Baptist Church located at 3101 South Martin Luther King Junior Drive and he was laid to rest on February 10, 1967 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman William Y. Bell, born May 12, 1941, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 17, 1964.

Officer Bell was survived by his wife, Valerie.

Detective Harry A. Belluomini

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Jul 1957
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
10021
Incident Date:
20 Jul 1992
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
58
End of Watch:
20 Jul 1992
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 650 - Area 5 Detectives
Date of Birth:
08 Oct 1933
Served:
33 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 7-W: 19

Incident Details:

Detective Harry A. Belluomini, Star #10021, aged 58 years, was a retired 33 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 650 - Area 5 Detectives Property Crimes.

In 1988, Detective Belluomini retired from the Chicago Police Department and began working as a Special Deputy Marshal for the U.S. Marshall Service.

On July 20, 1992, at approximately 5:30 p.m., inmate Jeffrey Erickson attempted to escape the custody of U.S. Marshals in the underground parking garage of the Dirksen Federal Building. Hidden in his mouth, Erickson had a handcuff key which he used to remove his restraints. After freeing himself, he assaulted and disarmed a U.S. Marshal. With the marshal's gun, he immediately shot and wounded Deputy U.S. Marshal Ray Frakes, age 30. Then, he encountered Special Deputy Marshal Harry Belluomini and shot him in the chest. U.S. Marshall Belluomini was able to return fire and strike Erickson in the back. Erickson committed suicide after additional officers confronted him and realized escape was impossible. Special Deputy Marshall Harry Belluomini and Deputy U.S. Marshal Roy Frakes were transported to Northwestern Memorial Hospital and were pronounced dead upon arrival at 5:57 p.m. on July 20, 1992.

Robert Burke was sentenced to 20 years in prison for perjuring himself to a grand jury about his role in providing Jeffrey Erickson with a handcuff key.

Detective Belluomini was waked at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home located at 6150 North Cicero Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Juliana Church located at 7142 North Osceola Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 24, 1992 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Detective Harry Belluomini, born October 8, 1933, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 1, 1957.

Detective Belluomini was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Milly; children: Anne Marie (CPD), Karen (CPD) and Michael (CPD) and sister.

Patrolman Joseph A. Bender Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 Aug 1919
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2958
Incident Date:
10 Feb 1927
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
11 Feb 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 11 - Englewood
Date of Birth:
25 May 1893
Served:
7 years, 6 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
007 - Englewood

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 5
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-W: 14

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph A. Bender, Sr., Star #2958, aged 33 years, was a 7 year, 6 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 11 - Englewood, detailed to the Detective Bureau.

On February 10, 1927, 10:00 p.m., Officer Joseph Bender, while off duty and in in civilian clothes, was returning home after attending a double wake at 5611 South Wood Street. The wake was for a mother and daughter, Mary Kelly Mooney and Mary Mooney Koppelmann. While at the wake some in attendance took note of a suspicious auto parked outside, but no one took any further actions to investigate it. As Officer Bender, unaware of the auto, left the wake the car pulled away and began to follow him home. Officer Bender lived nearby at 1642 West 57th Street. He had almost reached his home when the automobile pulled up beside him and the two men inside drew his attention. The two armed offenders, William Gall, age 18 and Victor Walinski, age 19, exited the automobile and approached Officer Bender announcing a robbery. They ordered Officer Bender to put up his hands. Instead, Officer Bender reached for his service revolver as one of the gunmen opened fire. Officer Bender was struck in the chest just above his heart and collapsed to the sidewalk as the gunmen fled. Several other policemen attending the wake heard the gunfire and attempted to give chase to the fleeing auto, but were unable to keep up on foot. Officer Bender was rushed to German Deaconess Hospital on Morgan Street where he died at 12:22 a.m. on February 11, 1927.

While enroute to the hospital, Bender told those riding with him what happened. Bender said, “They tried to stick me up and I wouldn’t have it.” It was believed the the robbery was similar to one committed at 5639 S. Hamilton Avenue, where Elmore Bell had been shot in front of his home. Captain John Egan stated that he believed the same two men had committed the two crimes. It was later learned, after the investigation, that Officer Bender had been shot with another officer's service revolver. That officer had been robbed in the exact same way by Gall and Walinski hours before Officer Bender was murdered. Both officers were in civilian clothes.

On February 18, 1927, William Gall and Victor Walinski were arrested after they wrecked a car they had stolen. During their interrogation they confessed to the murder of Office Bender. On February 27, 1927, they were indicted by the Grand Jury. Gall and Walinski were also found to be responsible for over 50 other robberies. On September 19, 1927, both boys were sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet on a plea of guilty to murder by Judge Eller.

Officer Bender was laid to rest in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph A. Bender, Sr., born May 25, 1893, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 5, 1919. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $300.00 during his career.

Officer Bender was survived by his wife, Genevieve and son, Joseph A., Jr., age 8.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7664.

Patrolman LeRoy N. Berry Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Jul 1966
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12789
Incident Date:
09 Oct 1969
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
09 Oct 1969
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Kensington
Date of Birth:
08 Sep 1942
Served:
3 years, 2 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Washington Memorial Cemetery - Homewood, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 43-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman LeRoy N. Berry, Jr., Star #12789, aged 27 years, was a 3 year, 2 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Kensington.

On October 9, 1969, at 9:37 p.m., Officer Berry was 10-99 on beat 508 and responded to a disturbance call in the parking lot of St. Thaddeus Catholic Church located at 9540 South Harvard Avenue. Upon arrival he had placed two youths into custody. He placed them inside the backseat of his squad car and began question them from the front seat. As the youths sat in the squad car, one of the youths produced a gun and fired at Officer Berry. Officer Berry fell out of the driver’s seat and fell to the ground mortally wounded. The two youths exited the car and opened the car’s trunk in an attempt to steal two shotguns, but when they opened the trunk the squad cars siren went off, a security feature. The two youths scared away by the siren fled the scene over the nearby Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad tracks. Priests Thomas Rafferty and John Cassidy saw the two youths fleeing the scene after they heard the siren from the squad car go off. When the priests went to investigate they found Officer Berry laying face down on the ground next the front passenger side tire of his squad car He was the apparent victim of an armed robbery and his service revolver, wallet and police star were missing. Father Rafferty, seeing that Officer Berry was near death, administered last rites. Three bullet holes were found in the squad car, one in the roof and one each in the front and side windows. Officer Berry was transported to Roseland Community Hospital by beat 670 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Lucine at 10:50 p.m. on October 9, 1969.

Descriptions of the offenders were given by Fathers Cassidy and Rafferty in addition to an unidentified witness. On October 10, 1969, based on the descriptions, police arrested Jonathan Brown, Age 20, of 723 East 91st Street, Charles Moore, age 21, of 9111 South Normal Avenue and Sedrick Moore, age 18, of 614 West 95th Street. On October 10, 1969, Hayden was released without charging. Brown and Moore were charged with murder, held to the Grand Jury without bond by Judge George E. Dolezal, On January 20, 1970, a true bill was returned on Brown and Moore. On February 10, 1970, both Brown and Moore were found not guilty by Judge Romuti.

Officer Berry was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 13, 1969 in Washington Memorial Cemetery, 701 Ridge Road, Homewood, Illinois.

Patrolman LeRoy N. Berry, Jr., born September 8, 1942, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 18, 1966 and was in Recruit Class 66-14A at the O'Brien Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Department Commendation and 1 Honorable Mention during his career.

Officer Berry served in U.S Marine Corps and was Honorably Discahrged. He was survived by his parents: Gertrude (nee Green) and LeRoy N., Sr. and siblings: Paul W., three other brothers and three sisters.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #H395067.

Detective Sergeant John L. N. Bialk

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Jan 1903
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
474
Incident Date:
21 Sep 1916
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
40
End of Watch:
24 Sep 1916
Unit of Assignment:
District 24, 40th Precinct - Lincoln Park
Date of Birth:
09 Dec 1875
Served:
13 years, 8 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 33-E: 4

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant John L. N. Bialk, Star #474, aged 40 years, was a 13 year, 8 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 24, 40th Precinct - Lincoln Park.

On September 21, 1916, Mrs. Nellie M. Acker, a landlady, went to the North Halsted Street station, and reported that a boarder, Charles N. Depew, had chased her from her home the day before. She also reported that Depew threatened to kill her and other boarders of the home. She was requesting a police escort to enter her home and remove Depew. An officer at the station house told Mrs. Depew to go back to her residence and wait for an officer, who would arrive shortly. She left the station and returned to her home. Detective Sergeant John Bialk was then dispatched to investigate the reports of the man who was threatening people. He was sent to a rooming house located at 1925 North Park Avenue (present day Lincoln Park West).

At 2:20 p.m., Detective Sergeant Bialk arrived and met Mrs. Acker. As they entered the home, Detective Sergeant Bialk confronted Depew. In response Depew produced a firearm and shot Mrs. Acker. Detective Sergeant Bialk attempted to disarm Depew and in the process was also shot in the abdomen. It had been thirty minutes since Detective Sergeant Bialk had been dispatched and reports began to come in to the station of the shooting. Depew was now running around the house waving his gun at other boarders. Additional police were dispatched to the scene and Detective Sergeant Bialk was transported to Alexian Brothers Hospital. Depew then surrendered without incident. After placing Depew in custody he was taken to Alexian Brothers Hospital so Detective Sergeant Bialk could identify him as his shooter before he died. Detective Sergeant Bialk lingered in the hospital and succumbed to his injuries three days later on September 24, 1916.

On September 29, 1916, Depew was charged with intentional manslaughter and held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. On January 9, 1917, he was acquitted of all charges by Judge Fitch.

Detective Sergeant Bialk was waked at his residence located at 2110 North High Street (present day Janssen Avenue) and he was laid to rest on September 27, 1916 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant John L. N. Bialk, born December 9, 1875, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 15, 1903. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915.

Detective Sergeant Bialk was survived by his wife and five children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3042.

Detective Sergeant Stanley J. Birns

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
322
Incident Date:
16 Jul 1914
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly
Age:
34
End of Watch:
16 Jul 1914
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Bureau
Date of Birth:
27 Sep 1879
Served:
8 years, 3 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-W: 13

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant Stanley J. Birns, Star #322, aged 34 years, was an 8 year, 3 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Bureau.

On July 16, 1914, Detective Sergeant Birns, under the command of First Deputy Superintendent M. C. Funkhouser, was assigned to lead a team of officers on a vice raid at Swann’s Poolroom located at 67 East 22nd Street (present day Cermak Road) in the cities levee district. The men were working in plain clothes. At the same time, a group of city morals inspectors, Special Police, under the command of Chief Morals Inspector W. C. Dannenberg were in the area also working in plainclothes. The morals inspectors were originally supposed to carry out raids on the North side of the city, but ended up at the same place as Detective Sergeant Birns.

Dannenberg’s men, Special Police Officers Fred Amart and Joseph Merril, Railway Fireman James Carroll and Investigator Johnson, had just finished raiding a spot known as The Turf where four prostitutes were openly soliciting business. The Clark Street patrol wagon was summoned to transport the four women and one man they had arrested. After the patrol wagon left, Dannenberg’s men then headed East to meet Inspector Dannenberg on Michigan Avenue. While walking to the location, the inspectors were followed by a group of neighborhood regulars. The regulars attempted to deny the group of men their element of surprise by being loud and obnoxious. The regulars then began throwing bricks at the men.

At 9:35 p.m., Dannenberg’s men reached Swann’s Poolroom and encountered Detective Sergeant Stanley Birns and his men. As Dannenberg’s men approached the poolroom with the neighborhood regulars on their back, Birn’s men observed them coming with the regulars following them. Detective Sergeant Birns and his men hurried for the crowd and heard someone yell, “Look out! They all have guns.” This was most likely shouted by one of the neighborhood regulars referring to Dannenberg’s men. Tragically, in a case of mistaken identity, gunfire erupted. Detective Sergeant Birns and his men drew their weapons and Dannenberg’s men opened fire in response thinking Birn’s men were attacking them. The two groups of men exchanged gunfire as pedestrians ran to escape the gunfire. One pedestrian, Roscoe Vantile was shot in the leg. Amart ran to the doorway of the pool hall, got behind a post and fired at Birns. Birns was hit but fired back. Amart then ran up the stairs where he was later found by responding police.

The sound of the gunfire brought policemen running in from the surrounding area. Officers from the 22nd Street Station, Bill Schubert’s Gambling crew and the Vice Quad all responded. When the smoke cleared all of the wounded and dead were identified and transported to the morgue or hospitals. Detective Sergeant Stanley Birns was the only death recorded in the incident. Investigator Johnson was arrested and taken to the 22nd Street Station accused of firing the shot that killed Birns. Special Police Officer Fred Amart was also arrested and accompanied Johnson to the station. Both men were questioned by General Superintendent James Gleason, First Deputy Superintendent Funkhouser and Captain Michael P. Ryan at various times. At the conclusion of the questioning all officers involved were exonerated and no charges were filed.

Detective Sergeant Birns was waked at his residence located at 1848 North Western Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 21, 1914 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant Stanley J. Birns, born September 27, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 2, 1906. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective by order of the city council on November 10, 1913.

Detective Sergeant Birns was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3004.

Patrolman Clarence H. Bixler

Image Not Available
Agency:
Rogers Park Police Department
Appointed Date:
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
21 Jun 1892
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
22 Jun 1892
Unit of Assignment:
Patrol
Date of Birth:
31 Aug 1856
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
024 - Rogers Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 21
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-E: 29

Incident Details:

Patrolman Clarence H. Bixler, Star # Unknown, aged 35 years, was a veteran of the Rogers Park Police Department, assigned to Patrol.

On June 21, 1892, at 2:00 p.m., Frank Doyle borrowed his brother's bicycle without asking his permission and rode to Rosehill Cemetery. This angered William Doyle and he started in pursuit of his brother intending, as he said, “to take the wheel away from him by force, if necessary.” The two brothers met in the cemetery and William demanded the return of his bicycle. Frank replied, "I will give it to you when I am ready and not before." William then said, "We won't settle it now, but we will when we get back to Rogers Park," as he turned and left the cemetery.

Frank Doyle rode back to Rogers Park, arriving there at 7:30 p.m. On the way he met several friends, and to one he remarked, "I am going to fix the first man who tries to separate me from my brother tonight." Subsequent developments proved that his prophesy was true.

Near the Police Station located at 7075 North Clark Street in the village of Rogers Park the two brothers met again. A crowd formed and urged the two to fight, it is said, but Frank Doyle showed no such inclination. He went to the home of a friend. It was there that Officer Bixler encountered him and said, "I understand you and William have been quarreling again," in a joking way.

Before he had a chance to utter another word Frank Doyle produced a revolver from his pocket and fired. Officer Bixler was struck in the head and collapsed to the sidewalk unconscious. Doyle quietly put the revolver back in his pocket and walked to his home four blocks away. At the front steps of his house he paused a moment as if hesitating whether to enter or not, suddenly he drew his revolver again and put a bullet into his right temple dying instantly. His mother summoned assistance and the remains were carried into the parlor of his home.

Two men found Officer Bixler lying on the sidewalk, and they carried him to the town hall, where a physician was summoned. He was very weak from loss of blood and it was not believed that he survive over night. The bullet had entered his forehead just over the right eye, lodging in his brain. All efforts to revive him were in vain. The police did not arrest William Doyle.

The Doyle brothers always bore a bad reputation in Rogers Park, and were known to cause the police considerable trouble.

Officer Bixler was laid to rest in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Clarence H. Bixler was born August 31, 1856.

Officer Bixler was unmarried and lived in Rogers Park.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The Rogers Park Police Department was absorbed into the Chicago Police Department after the Village of Rogers Park was annexed by the City of Chicago on April 4, 1893.

On April 29, 1878 Rogers Park was incorporated as a village of Illinois governed by six trustees. Early settler Philip Rogers bought this lakeside land in 1836 for $1.25 an acre. His son-in-law Patrick L. Touhy developed the area and started its rise to the bustling residential community that would eventually be incorporated into Chicago. It was bounded by Howard (7600 North) on the north, Devon Avenue on the south (6400 North), Lake Michigan on the east and Ridge Boulevard (1848-2100 West) on the west.

Patrolman Samuel M. Black

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Nov 1917
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1121
Incident Date:
16 Dec 1944
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
57
End of Watch:
16 Dec 1944
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
15 Dec 1887
Served:
27 years, 0 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery - Glenwood, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 5
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 39-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman Samuel M. Black, Star #1121, aged 57 years, was a 27 year, 0 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Wabash.

On December 16, 1944, Patrolman Ezra Caldwell and Patrolman Samuel M. Black were working beat 151 when they responded to radio call of a domestic disturbance at 5147 South Prairie Avenue in the first floor apartment. Officer Black was the first to enter the building and was met by Kermit Bredlove in the hallway. Bredlove asked Officer Black if he was looking for him and when Black said yes Bredlove drew his firearm and shot him at point-blank range in the face. Officer Black collapsed to the floor dying shortly after while Bredlove took his service revolver. Officer Caldwell, while in the squad car, heard the gunfire and went to investigate while Bredlove proceeded down the hallway and exited the building onto the front steps. It was on the steps where he was confronted by Officer Caldwell. Bredlove fired at Caldwell who returned fire and struck Bredlove three times. Officer Caldwell then attempted to take cover behind a truck parked on the street when he slipped. It was at this time Bredlove fired another round which would eventually prove fatal to Officer Caldwell.

Officer Caldwell continued to return fire until beat 162 arrived at the scene. Patrolman James McKenna exited his squad car and immediately fired at Bredlove after seeing Officer Caldwell lying on the ground gravely wounded. Bredlove was eventually arrested and sustained more than six gunshots to the chest and abdominal area during the shootout. Officer’s Black and Caldwell were transported to Provident Hospital where they were pronounced dead on arrival. Bredlove was taken to the Bridewell Hospital where he would later recover from his injuries.

Further investigation revealed that Bredlove had killed his wife, Goldine, just prior to the two officers arriving on the scene. The two had been arguing because Kermit Bredlove believed his wife had been flirting with another man at a party. Bredlove had shot his wife six time which caused neighbors to call for police.

Kermit Bredlove was charged with three counts of murder. He stood trial and on March 9, 1945 was found guilty and sentenced to 199 years in jail. On April 18, 1945, his sentence was amended, by a guilty verdict in the murder of Officer Black, to death by the electric chair. On September 14, 1945, Bredlove was executed in the electric chair.

Officer Black was laid to rest on December 20, 1944 in Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery, 18301 South Glenwood Thornton Road, Glenwood, Illinois.

Patrolman Samuel M. Black, born December 15, 1987, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 22, 1917. He earned 2 Credible Mentions and 2 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $360.00 during his career.

Officer Black was survived by his wife.

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