LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

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1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman David J. Cairns

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Apr 1911
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
911
Incident Date:
04 Feb 1927
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
47
End of Watch:
04 Feb 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 6 - Grand Crossing
Date of Birth:
13 Aug 1879
Served:
15 years, 10 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Evergreen Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 32-E: 11

Incident Details:

Patrolman David J. Cairns, Star #911, aged 47 years, was a 15 year, 10 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 6 - Grand Crossing.

On February 4, 1927, Patrolman Cairns was regulating traffic on the northwest corner of 79th Street and Stony Island Avenue. An automobile struck Officer Cairns whose driver, Charles Smith, then fled the scene. Smith was apprehended two blocks from the scene by another motorist who pursued and caught him.

Charles Smith was indicted and held by the Coroner. On February 4, 1927 the Grand Jury returned a No Bill.

Officer Cairns was laid to rest in Evergreen Cemetery, 3401 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman David J. Cairns, born August 13, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 5, 1919.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7817.

Patrolman Ezra Caldwell

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Feb 1940
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2969
Incident Date:
16 Dec 1944
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
16 Dec 1944
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
24 Dec 1909
Served:
4 years, 10 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Elmwood Cemetery - Sycamore, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 17-W: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Ezra Caldwell, Star #2969, aged 34 years, was a 4 year, 10 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Wabash.

On December 16, 1944, Patrolman Ezra Caldwell and Patrolman Samuel M. Black were working beat 151 when they responded to radio call of a domestic disturbance at 5147 South Prairie Avenue in the first floor apartment. Officer Black was the first to enter the building and was met by Kermit Bredlove in the hallway. Bredlove asked Officer Black if he was looking for him and when Black said yes Bredlove drew his firearm and shot him at point-blank range in the face. Officer Black collapsed to the floor dying shortly after while Bredlove took his service revolver. Officer Caldwell, while in the squad car, heard the gunfire and went to investigate while Bredlove proceeded down the hallway and exited the building onto the front steps. It was on the steps where he was confronted by Officer Caldwell. Bredlove fired at Caldwell who returned fire and struck Bredlove three times. Officer Caldwell then attempted to take cover behind a truck parked on the street when he slipped. It was at this time Bredlove fired another round which would eventually prove fatal to Officer Caldwell.

Officer Caldwell continued to return fire until beat 162 arrived at the scene. Patrolman James McKenna exited his squad car and immediately fired at Bredlove after seeing Officer Caldwell lying on the ground gravely wounded. Bredlove was eventually arrested and sustained more than six gunshots to the chest and abdominal area during the shootout. Officer’s Black and Caldwell were transported to Provident Hospital where they were pronounced dead on arrival. Bredlove was taken to the Bridewell Hospital where he would later recover from his injuries.

Further investigation revealed that Bredlove had killed his wife, Goldine, just prior to the two officers arriving on the scene. The two had been arguing because Kermit Bredlove believed his wife had been flirting with another man at a party. Bredlove had shot his wife six time which caused neighbors to call for police.

Kermit Bredlove was charged with three counts of murder. He stood trial and on March 9, 1945 was found guilty and sentenced to 199 years in jail. On April 18, 1945, his sentence was amended, by a guilty verdict in the murder of Officer Black, to death by the electric chair. On September 14, 1945, Bredlove was executed in the electric chair.

Officer Caldwell was laid to rest on December 20, 1944 in Elmwood Cemetery, 901 South Cross Street, Sycamore, Illinois.

Patrolman Ezra Caldwell, born December 24, 1909, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 13, 1940.

Officer Caldwell was survived by his wife, Catherine.

Patrolman Joseph Peter Cali

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Feb 1973
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3271
Incident Date:
19 May 1975
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
20 May 1975
Unit of Assignment:
13th District - Wood
Date of Birth:
22 Sep 1943
Served:
2 years, 3 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 30
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 56-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph Peter Cali, Star #3271, aged 31 years, was a 2 year, 3 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 13th District - Wood.

On May 19, 1975, at 9:15 p.m., Officer Cali was working special employment on his day off . He was partnered with Patrolman James Kehoe and they were working the 3rd watch on beat 1318. At 2103 West Lake Street the officers observed 1966 Chevrolet for being illegally parked at a bus stop. Officer Cali pulled along side the Chevrolet and exited the squad car to write a parking ticket while his partner remained in the car. Officer Cali, while standing on the sidewalk beside the car, was in the process of writing the citation when he was suddenly hit above his left ear by a bullet. The bullet passed through his brain and lodged in the left temple. he collapsed and fell face down on the sidewalk. Officer Cali had been shot by a sniper, from a window on the third floor, at the Henry Horner Homes located at 2105 West Lake Street, a public housing project. Officer Kehoe heard the shot turned to the right and did not see his partner anymore. He then exited the squad car to investigate and discovered Officer Cali lying face down on the ground with blood pouring from his head. Officer Kehoe immediately called in a 10-1, calling for an ambulance and backup, and took cover. Responding officers, beat 1325, placed Officer Cali in their backseat and rushed him to Cook County Hospital. During treatment, doctors had trouble deciding whether to remove the bullet from Officer Cali's skull or wait until his vital signs had stabilized. Officer Cali never regained consciousness and expired from his wound at 8:20 a.m. on May 20, 1975.

Meanwhile a door to door search of the complex was conducted for the sniper. A fire department helicopter searched from the air while another fire department illumination truck flooded the area with light. Other policemen aided by canine units were searching for four men seen fleeing the area. The increased police presence set off a demonstration in which bystanders threw bricks and bottles at police. Lester McCaulley, age 20, was arrested after he tried to kick a police dog. He was charged with disorderly conduct, interfering with police and mistreatment of a police dog.

On May 21, 1975, James Earl Clark, age 17, of 2051 West lake Street, was arrested after two witnesses stepped forward and after ballistics tests proved that the rifle he owned was the one used in the shooting. Police recovered the broken down rifle hidden inside Clark's apartment hidden in the couch. An expended shell casing was also recovered from the apartment across the hall from Clark's. It was in that apartment Clark fired the fatal shot. During interrogation Clark related that he had been in an argument with another neighborhood boy earlier in the evening and was waiting for the boy to make another pass on his bicycle. Before the boy made another pass the officers arrived and began to write the citation. The killer then told his cousins he was going to shoot an officer and fired the round which struck Officer Cali.

James Clark was charged with Murder and held to the Grand Jury. On June 4, 1975, the Grand Jury returned a true bill. During trial Clark plead guilty to Officer Cali’s murder and was subsequently sentenced to 20 to 25 years in prison. He was paroled in 1986 after serving less than half of his sentence.

Officer Cali was waked at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home located at 6150 North Cicero Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Juliana's Church located at 7200 North Osceola Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 23, 1975 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph Peter Cali, born September 25, 1943, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 19, 1973. He earned 5 Honorable Mentions and 2 Complimentary Letters during his career.

Officer Joseph Cali served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Sergeant. He was also a member of the Confederation of Police and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Neva (nee Moore); daughters: Carolyn Suzanne, age 2 and Jennifer Lynn, age 4 and siblings: Maryann and Phil.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #T189906.

On November 14, 2015, the 6400 block of North Oxford Avenue was dedicated as “Honorary Patrolman Joseph P. Cali Way.” One brown honorary sign was erected. The sign was located on the northeast corner of Devon and Oxford Avenues in heart of the Edison Park community where Officer Cali lived.

On July 7, 2016, in memory of Officer Cali Bill H.R. 5676, was proposed in the United States House of Representatives to designate the facility of the United States Postal service located at 6300 North Northwest Highway, as the “Officer Joseph P. Cali Post Office Building.“ The house voted in the affirmative to suspend the rules and the bill was passed. It was ordered, that the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill. The senate brought the bill to a vote and the bill was approved on December 10, 2016. On April 23, 2017, a dedication ceremony was held at the building.

Patrolman Michael D. Callahan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2842
Incident Date:
03 Jan 1908
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
04 Jan 1908
Unit of Assignment:
District 15, 29th Precinct - Warren
Date of Birth:
07 Oct 1879
Served:
1 year, 8 months, 26 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 38
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 14-W: 4

Incident Details:

Patrolman Michael D. Callahan, Star #2842, aged 29 years, was a 1 year, 8 month, 26 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 15, 29th Precinct - Warren.

On January 3, 1908, at 8:00 p.m., Officer Callahan was on patrol with his partner, Patrolman James Monohan. The two officers were on the lookout for the man who had just shot Detective Sergeant William R. Mooney. As was their customary practice when on the lookout for criminals, the two officers would walk a half a block apart. The Officers were walking southbound on Hoyne Avenue with Officer Callahan in the lead. At Washington Boulevard two pairs of young men, one on either side of the street, caught the attention of Officer Callahan. The young men, as was later learned, were held up all day in a room they had rented located at No. 356 West Madison Street (present day 1137 West Madison Street). They had been planning an evening of robberies and when Officer Callahan spotted them they were looking for a victims.

The four youths were David Anderson age 20 of No. 493 Park Avenue (present day 2510 West Maypole Avenue) was a paroled prisoner from Pontiac Reformatory, John Dennin of No. 333 Washington Boulevard (present day 1140 West Washington Boulevard), Joseph Lemke of No. 870 Grand Avenue (present day 2355 West Grand Avenue), Bert McCagg a teamster of No. 454 North Ridgeway Avenue (present day 931 North Ridgeway Avenue). Anderson and McCagg were on the same side of the street as Officer Callahan, while the other two were across the street. Officer Callahan approached and grabbed Anderson by the arm and asked to give an account of himself. In response Anderson fired striking Officer Callahan in the abdomen once. Hearing the gunfire, Dennin and Lemke fled the scene. Anderson Then turned to flee as Officer Callahan drew his revolver and returned fire. McCagg also turned to flee and as he turned a round fired by Officer Callahan struck him. As Anderson fled he fired two more times, one of those rounds striking McCagg in the abdomen. Officer Callahan’s shots missed Anderson as he ran. McCagg was struck a second time and fell to the ground as he attempted to flee. In an instant Officer Callahan was on him and the two men began to grapple on the sidewalk.

Meanwhile Officer Monohan seeing what had just transpired began to chase Anderson. Also hearing the commotion, Patrolman Jerry Lynch who was standing at Madison Street and Hoyne Avenue ran to assist. Upon arrival Officer Lynch observed Officer Callahan with his knee resting on McCagg’s chest. Officer Callahan asked Officer Lynch to summon a Patrol Wagon. When the Patrol Wagon arrived the two officers and McCagg got inside. Officer Callahan said, “I got this fellow, but I Guess the other fellow got me.” It was at this time that Officer Lynch realized he was shot and Officer Callahan was rushed to Roosevelt Hospital where he died from his wounds the next day on January 4, 1908. McCagg was taken to Cook County Hospital where he died from his wounds on January 6, 1908.

Following the shooting, Captain Healy from the Warren Avenue Station went to the Cook County Hospital to question McCagg. McCagg gave up his companion’s name and address. Captain Healy with Detectives Fitzgerald, Murphy, O’Keefe and Shea relocated to the address and found Anderson in bed, Anderson denied any connection with the shooting, but a black hat and a muffler similar to those described by Officer Callahan were found in his room. A short time later, Patrolman Reed of the Warren Avenue Station and Patrolman O’Neill of the Desplaines Street Station apprehended Dennin and Lemke at Madison Street and Central Avenue. During questioning the two men confirmed McCagg’s statements about the shooting and to be on the lookout to commit robberies.

On January 6, 1908, David Anderson was arrested and held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner for murder. John Dennin and Joseph Lemke were also arrested and held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner as accessories. Dennin and Anderson were tried, convicted and on July 1, 1908 sentenced. Dennin received 14 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet and Anderson was to hang on October 16, 1908. On May, 19, 1909, Lemke's case was stricken off the record. Anderson, who was sentenced to hang, was granted a stay of execution pending the hearing of an appeal to the Supreme Court, it is unknown what the outcome of the appeal was.

Officer Callahan was waked at his residence located at 1349 West Congress Street (present day 3027 West Congress Street), his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Sorrow Church located at 3121 West Jackson Boulevard and he was laid to rest on January 7, 1908 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. His grave is located in Section Y, Block 35, Lot N5.

Patrolman Michael D. Callahan, born October 7, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 9, 1906.

Officer Callahan was a member of Division 1 of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Catharine (nee Barton); daughter, Margaret and sister, Mrs. Kearins.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #469.

On October 14, 1910, Officer Callahan's star was retired by General Superintendent LeRoy T. Steward and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, City Hall, 121 North LaSalle Street, Room 505, Office of the Superintendent of Police. Officer Shea's star was one of fourteen stars added to the newly instituted memorial to preserve the memory of officers killed in the line of duty. The tradition of retiring a star number was born. In 1928, the star case was moved to the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters again moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Callahan's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman James Henry Camp Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
31 May 1994
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3934
Incident Date:
09 Mar 1999
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
09 Mar 1999
Unit of Assignment:
21st District - Prairie
Date of Birth:
12 Mar 1964
Served:
4 years, 9 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 27
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2-W: 22

Incident Details:

Patrolman James Henry Camp, Jr., Star #3934, aged 34 years, was a 4 year, 9 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 21st District - Prairie Gang Team.

On March 9, 1999, at 2:02 p.m., Officer Camp and his partner, Patrolman Kenny King were working in plain clothes. As they exited the Madden Park Homes public housing complex located on the 3800 block of South Cottage Grove Avenue they observed two people sitting in a vehicle. The car, a dark colored Chevy Caprice with Indiana license plates, looked suspicious to the officers. The officers approached the vehicle, Officer Camp the driver's side door and Officer King the passenger side door. Upon stepping up to the vehicle they noticed the steering column had been tampered with. Officer Camp ordered the driver, Kevin Dean, age 42, of the 5500 block of South Michigan Avenue and an ex-convict, out of the vehicle. Dean refused to comply with the order at which time Officer Camp opened the door of the car and attempted to physically remove him. A struggle ensued and Dean gained control of Officer Camp’s firearm and pulled the trigger. Officer Camp was struck in the head and collapsed to the ground. As Officer King attempted to come to his partner's aid, Dean and the passenger, Yvonne Harris, age 38, fled the scene on foot. Responding officers encountered Dean running from the scene with a gun in his hand and used the officer's gun to fire at the squad car. Patrolman Earl Carter returned fire, striking Dean five times and wounding him. Dean attempted to make good his escape was thwarted, however Harris was able to make good her escape. Dean was taken into custody without further incident and later made a full recovery from his gunshot wounds. Officer Camp was transported to Cook County Hospital by CFD Ambulance #57 where he was pronounced deat at 2:30 p.m. on March 9, 1999.

Yvonne Harris later turned herself in and was questioned about her cousin, Dean. Kevin Dean was charged with murder, attempted murder, aggravated battery of an officer, disarming a police officer and possession of stolen auto. He stood trial and was acquitted of the murder and of the attempted murder charges. However, Dean was convicted of disarming Officer Camp and for the possession of a stolen auto. The judge sentenced Dean to the maximum of two consecutive 30-year prison terms. He appealed the sentence and was re-sentenced to only 28 years in prison.

Officer Camp was waked at Cage Funeral Home located at 7651 South Jeffrey Boulevard, his funeral mass was held at St. Philip Neri Catholic Church located at 2132 East 72nd Street and he was laid to rest on March 16, 1999 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman James Henry Camp, Jr., born March 12, 1964, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 31, 1994 and was in Recruit Class 94-3A at the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Department Commendation, 23 Honorable Mentions and 1 Complimentary Letter during his career.

Officer Camp served in the U.S. Marine Corps from March 1987 to February 25, 1995 and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Opal Tracee (nee Fryson), age 34; siblings: John Majors, Mary Galloway, Rodney Davis and Tony and stepfather, Meredith Palmer.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #D137935.

On August 12, 1999, Officer Camp's star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Camp's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby. Patrolman James H. Camp's star was the last star to be enshrined in the Chicago Police Headquarters building located at 1121 South State Street.

Patrolman James Warren Campbell

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Jul 1971
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
15250
Incident Date:
01 Feb 1974
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
09 Feb 1974
Unit of Assignment:
9th District - Deering
Date of Birth:
03 Jun 1944
Served:
2 years, 6 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Burr Oak Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 27
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 24-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman James Warren Campbell, Star #15250, aged 29 years, was a 2 year, 6 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 9th District - Deering.

On February 1, 1974, at aproximately 9:20 a.m., Officer Campbell was on duty inside a Currency Exchange located at 5111 South Halsted Street cashing a check in uniform. While Officer Campbell was filling out a money order, one of two male black assailants approached Officer Campbell from behind and grabbed his service revolver. A struggle over the firearm ensued and Officer Campbell was shot. As he fell to the ground he was shot three more times by the offender. Officer Campbell then tried to grab his service revolver and observed the offenders drop a small pistol as they fled the scene without taking any money. Two of the bullets struck Officer Campbell in the back severing his spinal cord leaving him partially paralyzed. He was transported to Billings Hospital by beat 971. While in the hospital he suffered from two heart attacks which required him undergo open-heart surgery. Officer Campbell died on the operating table and pronounced dead at 12:45 a.m. on February 9, 1974 by Dr. R. Prabahker.

No suspects have been identified or arrested in connection with Officer Campbell's death. Alderman Anna Langford offered a $1000 reward, the Chicago Police Captain's Association offered a $1000 reward and the Community Currency Exchange Association offered a $5000 reward all for information leading to the arrest of the offender.

Officer Campbell was waked at A. A. Raynor and Sons Funeral Home located at 318 East 71st Street, his funeral mass was held at Progressive Baptist Church located at 3658 South Wentworth Avenue and he was laid to rest on February 13, 1974 in Burr Oak Cemetery, 4400 West 127th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman James Warren Campbell, born June 3, 1944, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 26, 1971.

Officer Campbell served in the U.S. Air Force from 1963 to 1967 and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his fiancée, Yvette Stamps and children: Antoinette, age 12, Darren, age 10; mother, Olivia; step-father; two sisters; two brothers; two step-sisters and one step-brother.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #P045611.

On May 21, 1998, Officer Campbell's star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Campbell's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman Anthony Cannata

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
30 Jul 1951
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2216
Incident Date:
15 Jun 1953
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile (Pursuit)
Age:
36
End of Watch:
15 Jun 1953
Unit of Assignment:
26th District - Monroe
Date of Birth:
27 Dec 1916
Served:
1 year, 11 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 24-W: 28

Incident Details:

Patrolman Anthony Cannata, Star #2216, aged 36 years, was a 1 year, 11 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 26th District - Monroe.

On June 15, 1953, Officer Cannata and his partner, Patrolman Red Irving Posner, were working the 1st watch in car No. 340. The officers were assigned to a special hoodlum harassment detail. The detail was formed the week previous after 10 rounds were fired into the Racine Avenue police station by a speeding auto. While on patrol the officers observed a parked auto without a license plate as they approached Chicago Avenue and Noble Street. The car matched a description of one used the previous Thursday in the kidnapping of State Representative Clem Graver. As the officers approached, the men in the car fled, speeding away. The officers pursued in their squad car and as the pursuit neared Milwaukee Avenue, near Walton Street, another vehicle in traffic cut them off. The officers had to swerve to avoid hitting the vehicle, their squad car then struck a light pole in front of 958 North Milwaukee Avenue. The men in the fleeing vehicle made good their escape and were never apprehended. Officer Cannata suffered fatal injuries upon impact and died at the scene, he was transported to St. Mary of Nazareth Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arival. Officer Posner was transported to Henrotin Hospital in critical condition and later made a full recovery. The bandits made good their escape following the crash and were never apprehended.

Officer Cannata was waked at Lucania Funeral Home located at 6901 West Belmont Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Philip Benizi Church located at 515 West Oak Street and he was laid to rest on June 18, 1953 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Patrolman Anthony Cannata, born December 27, 1916, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 30, 1951.

Officer Cannata served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of World War II and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Eleanor, age 34; children: Camelle, age 14, Rosetta, age 10, Samuel, age 15 and mother, Katherine.

On January 11, 2006, Officer Cannata's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Detective James J. Caplis

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
08 May 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1511
Incident Date:
21 Dec 1931
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
21 Dec 1931
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Bureau
Date of Birth:
18 Nov 1898
Served:
7 years, 7 months, 13 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 31
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 20-E: 17

Incident Details:

Detective James J. Caplis, Star #1511, aged 33 years, was a 7 year, 7 month, 13 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Bureau.

On December 21, 1931, at 1:00 a.m., Detective Caplis, while off duty was dining at a Chinese Restaurant, The Beach View Garden Restaurant located at 804 West Wilson Avenue on the 2nd floor. Detective Caplis was with his girlfriend, Miss Marie Pelzer of 4733 North Kedvale Avenue, enjoying a late night meal. The restaurant was a popular late night venue which also had a live orchestra. Outside, five men had pulled up at the main entrance on Clarendon Street and left their vehicle parked nearby. The men, part of the "42" gang, had taken the doorman, Leon Johnson, captive as they made their way upstairs. The orchestra leader, Verne Buck, had just lowered his baton and more than a dozen patrons were returning to their seats from the dance floor when the five men armed with shotguns and revolvers entered and announced a "stick up." Forcing Johnson to walk in front of them as they entered, the bandits split up, one going to the kitchen, one locking the head waiter in a washroom, one commanding the orchestra, another ordering the patrons onto the dance floor, while the fifth remained at the door. The men then made their way to the cashiers’ cage where they confronted the restaurants manager, M.S. Bow and Assistant manager, J.D. King. The bandits made an announcement to all customers, “All right, no trouble. We mean business.”

Unbeknownst to Detective Caplis, prior to the robbery taking place, the bandits had planted armed accomplices in the restaurant, two men and a woman. As the 50 or 60 patrons arose to obey the bandit’s orders to line up against a wall, Caplis waited behind as the other patrons walked toward the designated wall. Detective Caplis then edged along the wall toward the door to cut off the bandit’s escape. By this act, Detective Caplis made himself the sole target for expected gunfire and was free to battle the robbers. He fired at the nearest bandit who then turned towards him and fired back. At the same time, he retreated; the robbers were still menacing the crowd, and one or two of them blazing away at Caplis. Caplis moved forward as the robbers reached the stairway, firing as he went. By this time, he was between the gunmen and several of the guests. One of the robbers fired a charge from his shotgun. It was two slugs of this charge, one of which struck a patron, Peggy Griggs, age 20. The bandits nearest the door bolted down the stairs pursued by Detective Caplis. Surprisingly, Detective Caplis still had not been shot as he raced to the head of the stairs to send a final shot at the fleeing bandits. Before he had the opportunity to fire at the fleeing robbers he was shot in the back supposedly by a bandit following, who leaped over the officer's prostrate body where he collapsed on the intermediate landing. Detective Caplis was carried to Lakeview Hospital by a dozen citizens where he succumbed to his injuries at 4:00 a.m. the same day.

Through an informant it was learned that two girls, one a 16-year-old and the other a 17-year-old, had also participated in the attempted robbery. Dorothy Evans and Marcella Royce were arrested, which led to confessions and an almost complete roundup of the bandit gang. One of the girls provided information concerning the chain of events; stating that one of the women, armed with a revolver was sitting at a table with two men, when the robber band arrived, the trio joined them. Those responsible were Nicholas Bruno; Harlborn Burlison, alias “Jack Burlison;” Ralph DeFillipis; Rocco DeFillipis, alias “DeFerro;” Dorothy Evans; Frank Freeman, alias ”Red Freeman;” Herman Glick, alias “Herman Cohen;” Tony Pape; Frank Piazza, alias “Prazza” and Marcella Royce. Ralph DeFillipis was found to have furnished the firearms. All were indicted for Detective Caplis’ murder.

On December 27, 1931, the following bandits were found guilty and sentenced as follows. Nicholas Bruno was sentenced to 20 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Jack Burlison was sentenced to 50 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Ralph De Fillipis and Frank Freeman were each sentenced to 99 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Tony Pape and Frank Piazza were each sentenced to 14 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.

Dorothy Evans and Marcella Royce turned state's evidence and their charges were dropped. On April 5, 1932, Herman Glick was murdered. Rocco Ferra, alias Rocco the Barber, was never apprehended.

On March 25, 1965, Freeman was paroled from Menard State Prison after serving 33 years. He spent 25 years of that in the psychiatric division and the remainder working as a nurse in the division infirmary. Although he was sentenced to 99 years, he was released early under the revised Illinois Criminal Code which allowed inmates serving sentences of 20 years or more a parole hearing after serving 11 years of a sentence.

Detective Caplis' funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Sorrows Basilica located at 3121 West Jackson Boulevard and he was laid to rest on December 21 1931 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Detective James J. Caplis, born November 18, 1898, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 8, 1924. He earned 7 Credible Mentions and 4 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $780.00 during his career. Caplis was also a winner of The Tribune Monthly Hero Award in June 1928.

Detective Caplis was survived by his mother; father and sister, Mrs. Edward [Nellie] Flood.

Police Officer Michael Capparelli

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
1991
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
92
Incident Date:
27 Mar 1992
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
28
End of Watch:
27 Mar 1992
Unit of Assignment:
Patrol
Date of Birth:
11 Jan 1964
Served:
1 year*
District of Incident (Present Day):
016 - Jefferson Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Maryhill Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 6
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 38-E: 18

Incident Details:

Police Officer Michael Capparelli, Star # Unknown, aged 29 years, was a 1 year veteran of the Chicago Department of Aviation Police Department, assigned to Patrol.

On March 27, 1992, Officer Michael Capparelli's patrol car crossed the median of Spine Road and struck an oncoming semitrailer dump truck head-on on airport property at O'Hare International Airport. He was killed in the incident. The truck driver suffered only minor injuries. Michael Capparelli lived in the 3200 block of North Pittsburgh Avenue in Chicago.

Officer Capparelli was waked at Belmont Funeral Home located at 7120 West Belmont Avenue and he was laid to rest in Maryhill Catholic Cemetery, 8600 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Police Officer Michael Capparelli, born February 25, 1963, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Department of Aviation Police in 1991.

Officer Capparelli was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Alice (nee Crawley); mother, Alice and sisters: Anne Capparelli-Oldham and Laura.

Park Policeman Daniel J. Carey Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
116
Incident Date:
13 Dec 1923
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
30
End of Watch:
15 Dec 1923
Unit of Assignment:
Patrol Division
Date of Birth:
20 Nov 1893
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 9
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-W: 7

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Daniel J. Carey, Sr., Star #116, aged 30 years, was a veteran of the South Park Police Department, assigned to the Patrol Division.

On December 13, 1923, Officer Carey was on patrol riding his motorcycle. He stopped traffic at 32nd Street and South Michigan Avenue, in South Park, to shoot a lame horse that had broken its leg. The horse was blocking traffic in the intersection. While in the street, Officer Carey was struck by a vehicle that had barreled through the intersection at a high rate of speed and sustained a fractured skull. Andrew B. Douglas of 833 West George Street who was accompanied by George Leach of 4704 North Kildare Avenue drove the vehicle. Officer Carey was taken to Michael Reese Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries two days later on December 15, 1923.

Both Douglas and Leach were arrested. On December 17, 1923, Andrew B. Douglas was held to the Coroner's Grand Jury. It is unknown the outcome.

Officer Carey was waked at his residence located at 5813 South Indiana Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Holy Cross Catholic Church located at 842 East 65th Street and he was laid to rest on December 17, 1923 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Park Policeman Daniel J. Carey, Sr. was born on November 20, 1893.

Officer Carey was survived by his wife, Margaret (nee Kelly); son, Daniel J., Jr. and siblings: Genevieve, James, John, Margaret, Marie and Thomas.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5921.

The South Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park district police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the South Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Detective Edward F. Carney

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Jul 1892
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
83
Incident Date:
30 Nov 1893
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
08 Dec 1893
Unit of Assignment:
Central Station
Date of Birth:
1863
Served:
1 year, 5 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 58-E: 11

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward F. Carney, Star #83, aged 29 years, was a 1 year, 5 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Central Station.

On November 30, 1893, Detective Carney and his partner, Detective John Conway were under orders to stop and question any pedestrian found in a residential area in the late hours of the night. Police were on alert due to a recent series of crimes in the area. While walking in the residential area, the detectives observed A. F. Holmes and James G. Potter, at 39th Street and Langley Avenue. The detectives stopped the men and attempted to question them. Taking offense to being stopped, the men became confrontational. This led the detective to placing the men under arrest. As they were being placed into custody, both men drew large Colt revolvers. One bandit struck Detective Conway over the head and the other shot Detective Carney. Detective Carney sustained a gunshot wound to his lower right leg, the bullet lodging in his knee. The men then made good their escape.

After the shooting, Detective Carney was taken to his brother’s residence located at No. 2931 Union Avenue (present day 2931 South Union Avenue). Doctors were called and decided against extracting the bullet, believing it would do more harm than good. Detective Carney lingered there for seven days, his wound becoming infected with blood poisoning. On December 8, 1893, he was taken to Chicago Hospital located at 15th Street and Champlain Avenue where he underwent emergency surgery. He developed complications during surgery and died at 7:00 p.m. on December 8, 1893.

Holmes and Potter were arrested a short time after the incident and taken to the 35th Street Station. During questioning the men identified themselves as Private Investigators for the Thiel Detective Agency. Following questioning the men were released from custody. After the death of Detective Carney, warrants for Holmes and Potter were issued and they were rearrested. Holmes was charged with murder and Potter with accessory. The men were then held by the Criminal Court and bond set.

Detective Carney was waked at his residence located at No. 2931 Union Avenue (present day 2931 South Union Avenue), his funeral mass was held in Requiem at All Saints’ Church and he was laid to rest on December 12, 1893 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Detective Edward F. Carney, born in 1863, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 2, 1892.

Detective Carney was survived by his wife, Maggie; parents: John and Johanna and siblings: John (CPD) and Mrs. A. E. Sachse.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2813.

Note: The "Central Station" is not to be confused with "District 1, 1st Precinct - Central" as these were separate and distinct units at the time.

Temporary Detective Roy A. Carney Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Feb 1946
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7603
Incident Date:
18 Apr 1958
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
18 Apr 1958
Unit of Assignment:
7th District - Woodlawn
Date of Birth:
07 Nov 1922
Served:
12 years, 2 months, 0 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Burr Oak Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 5
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 9-E: 8

Incident Details:

Temporary Detective Roy A. Carney, Jr., Star #7603, aged 35 years, was a 12 year, 2 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 7th District - Woodlawn.

On April 18, 1958, Detective Carney, while off duty, was at the New Marquette Inn, a tavern at 160 East Marquette Road. He was with his wife, Carrie, who owned the tavern and was with six patrons when two gunmen entered. The two men, Larry Oden and James Davis, drew guns and announced a robbery. Larry Oden ushered Detective Carney and the patrons into a back room and force them to lie down. Once Detective Carney was lying on the floor, Oden moved to search him. As Carney drew his revolver he began to grapple with Oden who called out to James Davis for help. Davis ran into the back room and fired two shots at Carney. One of the bullets struck him in the left temple. The gunmen then fled the tavern in a 1951 black Cadillac which was driven by a third man. Carney was pronounced dead at St. Bernard's Hospital. One of the suspects was captured hours later.

During the investigation, Detective Carney's revolver was found unfired laying on the floor alongside his body. A blockade was set up around the area in an effort to trap the bandits and the police task force was sent in. Unbeknownst to Patrolman James Brooks, who was patrolling the area the night of the shooting, he had pulled over the men just after they fled the shooting. The men were traveling the wrong way on a one way stretch of 66th Street at State Street. Patrolman Brooks cautioned the men not to continue and they drove off. Officer Brooks learned of the shooting minutes later but by that time the bandit’s car had disappeared.

On April 25, 1958, Larry Oden was arrested and confessed to the robbery. He told detectives that it was their third tavern holdup of the night. He said the shooting occurred when Detective Carney began to draw his weapon and he had to struggle with him and called Davis for help. That was when Davis came and shot Carney. Oden also confessed to shooting Pronoico Rivera, age 37, during another holdup of a tavern on April 4, 1958. Two other men were arrested as companions of Oden and Davis. Arrested were Joe Adams, age 21 and Noel Taylor, age 23, for a series of south side tavern holdups over the previous eight months. On May 2, 1958, John Davis was arrested in Alexandria, Louisiana. On May 24, 1958, Davis was extradited back to Chicago. On November 21, 1958, Davis and Oden stood a jury trial and were convicted. They were both sentenced to death in the electric chair.

Detective Carney was waked at Metropolitan Funeral Parlors located at 4445 South Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive and he was laid to rest on April 23, 1958 in Burr Oak Cemetery, 4400 West 127th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Temporary Detective Roy A. Carney, Jr., born November 7, 1922, received a Temporary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 18, 1946 prior to his Probationary Appointment to the Department on October 15, 1947. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. On November 16, 1956, Borcia was promoted to Temporary Detective. In 1954 Carney was assigned to the robbery detail in the "little detective bureau" of the Woodlawn precinct. He assisted in breaking up a gang responsible for some 200 cleaning store robberies in which he earned his Credible Mention.

Detective Carney served in the U.S. Army Air Corps from October 2, 1942 to 1945, was a veteran of World War II and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Carrie; two children, parents: Roy (CPD) and Fannie (nee Fite) and brother, Leonard. His father was also a Chicago Police Detective of 23 years attached to the Prairie Avenue Station Narcotics Unit at the time of the incident.

On December 30, 1958, Officer Carney's star was retired by Commissioner Timothy J. O'Connor and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Carney's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

On March 2, 2010, Officer Carney's star was once again retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman James H. Carroll

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 May 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
517
Incident Date:
27 Nov 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
31
End of Watch:
27 Nov 1925
Unit of Assignment:
District 6 - Grand Crossing
Date of Birth:
25 Apr 1894
Served:
1 year, 6 months, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Hope Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 16
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman James H. Carroll, Star #517, aged 31 years, was a 1 year, 6 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 6 - 75th Street Station, detailed to the Detective Bureau in plainclothes.

On November 27, 1925, at 3:10 a.m., Officer Henry and his partner, Patrolman James H. Carroll, were on duty in plain clothes. They were ordered to stand watch outside a “soft drink parlor,” owned by John McKeone, located at 5253 South Halsted Street. They were standing watch in addition to dozens of other officers surrounding Lloyd Austin’s Englewood Avenue apartment on the lookout for Martin Durkin. Durkin was wanted for car theft, for severely wounding three Chicago Police Officers and for the murder of an FBI Special Agent Edwin C. Shanahan on October 11, 1925. He had a $500.00 reward out for his arrest.

Although the officers were ordered to stand watch outside the saloon, they had been keeping watch from inside for several nights because Officer Carroll was ill. While sitting inside near a stove in the barroom there was a knock at the door. The bartender, George Howard, let in three men who claimed to be policemen. The bandits brandished weapons and ordered everyone to put their hands up, announcing a robbery. Officers Carroll and Henry confronted the robbers and shooting erupted almost instantly. Officer Carroll fired six rounds, all of which were later recovered in the wall. Officer Carroll and Officer Henry both received several gunshot wounds in the exchange. Officer Carroll was shot in the head and died on scene. Officer Henry was shot in the abdomen and succumbed to his wounds three days later on November 30, 1925. A patron, Martin Custer, was also shot and killed. The robbers escaped without being hit and were never apprehended.

Officer Carroll was waked at his residence located at 6828 South Calumet Avenue, his funeral mas was also held at his residence and he was laid to rest in Mount Hope Cemetery, 11500 South Fairfield Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman James H. Carroll, born April 25, 1894, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 9, 1924. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Carroll was survived by his wife, Agnes (nee Mae); children: Barbara, Esther, Judith, Mae and the late Jane Gloria; parents: Mr. and Mrs. James C. Carroll and siblings: Allan A. and Mrs. J. R. Kelso.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8184.

Sergeant Harry J. Gray, also attempting to apprehend Durkin, was also killed in the line of duty, by Durkin's girlfriend, on November 2, 1925.

Patrolman Daniel J. Carton

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Sep 1911
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3216
Incident Date:
30 Jul 1919
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
18 Sep 1919
Unit of Assignment:
District 18, 23rd Precinct - Austin
Date of Birth:
05 Jun 1885
Served:
8 years, 0 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Cemetery - DeKalb, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 57
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2-W: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman Daniel Joseph Carton, Star #3216, aged 34 years, was an 8 year, 0 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 18, 23rd Precinct - Austin.

On July 30, 1919, Officer Carton was assigned to maintain order during a period of civil unrest. Tensions were running high in the city and disagreements turned bloody at the drop of a hat. Officer Carton attempted to quell a barroom scuffle in a saloon at 43rd Street and Union Avenue. After intervening in the fight, John Ward produced a gun and fired at Officer Carton. Officer Carton was struck and mortally wounded but was able to return fire. Ward was struck by the return fire and died from his wounds the next day on September 19, 1919. Officer Carton was taken to the hospital where he was treated. He survived for seven weeks before succumbing to his injuries on September 18, 1919.

Officer Carton was laid to rest on September 20, 1919 in St. Mary Cemetery, 531 Sycamore Road, DeKalb, Illinois. His grave is located in Block 3, Lot 80, Grave 8.

Patrolman Daniel J. Carton, born June 5, 1885, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 15, 1911.

Officer Carton was survived by his children: Francis A. and Mary E. Carton O’Brien.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3317.

Patrolman James Joseph Casey

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 May 1919
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2807
Incident Date:
30 Jun 1931
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
39
End of Watch:
01 Jul 1931
Unit of Assignment:
Traffic Division
Date of Birth:
06 Nov 1891
Served:
12 years, 1 month, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 31
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman James Joseph Casey, Star #2807, aged 39 years, was an 11 year, 8 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Traffic Division.

On June 30, 1931, at 10:00 p.m., Officer James Casey had responded to a complaint by Miss Frances Bosky of 4339 South Greenwood Avenue. Also filing a complaint was her friend, Bert Boff. Bosky, a waitress related to Officer Casey that she and her escort, Mr. Boff, had been insulted by Coy Thompson of 4222 South Berkley Avenue, when she left her place of employment. She worked at a restaurant at 43rd Street and Oakenwald Avenue. The insult came after Bosky rebuffed Thompson’s rude advances. It was at that time that Boff stood up to Thompson when he pulled a gun on the couple. Officer Casey was able to locate and place into custody Mr. Thompson, confiscating a revolver in the process. While en route to the station, at 43rd Street and Oakenwald Avenue, Thompson drew a second weapon and shot Patrolman Casey eight times. Thompson made good his escape, but was captured 20 minutes later after police officers were apprised of his presence in a building at 4301 South Oakenwald Avenue, where he was re-arrested. Officer Casey sustained several gunshot wounds and died the next day on July 1, 1931.

Coy Thompson was held to the Coroner on the charge of murder. On July 6, 1931, he pleaded not guilty and waived his right to a jury trial. Thompson was convicted of murder and sentenced to 100 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Philip J. Finnegan. In 1960, Coy Thompson was paroled from prison after serving 29 years.

Officer Casey was waked at his residence located at 4463 South Lake Park Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Ambrose Church located at 1012 East 47th Street and he was laid to rest on July 3, 1931 in Mount Olivet Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman James Joseph Casey, born November 6, 1891, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 23, 1919.

Officer Casey was survived by his mother, Ellen (nee Daly) and siblings: Daniel, Edward, George, Helen L., Lorretta Lyman and May Bohart.

Probationary Patrolman Ernest H. Cassidy

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
12 Aug 1921
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2692
Incident Date:
03 Apr 1922
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
26
End of Watch:
03 Apr 1922
Unit of Assignment:
District 7 - South Chicago
Date of Birth:
09 Oct 1895
Served:
7 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 6
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 29-E: 2

Incident Details:

Probationary Patrolman Ernest H. Cassidy, Star #2692, aged 26 years, was a 7 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 7 - South Chicago.

On April 3, 1922, at 8:50 p.m., Officer Cassidy was on duty and escorting the Treasurer, Philip Sommer, of the Royal Building & Loan Association as he carried a satchel containing $4,200.00 in cash and $3,800.00 in checks, the day’s receipts. This was their nightly routine. They were walking to the bank located at 9117 South Commercial Avenue and as they walked down the street, Sommers exchanged greetings with passersby. In a coincidence of events he had a conversation with one man who had inquired about his regular evening walk of transferring cash. Sommers replied, ”Yes. You know last week I had a dream I was held up. So on that Monday I had them give me two policemen. Nothing Happened. So I reduced the guard to one again,” ironically unaware as to what would soon transpire.

Officer Cassidy and Mr. Sommers continued their walk and oddly there were no pedestrians within the last 100 feet of their walk. This was always a busy stretch and always bustling with pedestrians. As the men arrived in front of the bank, five armed offenders pulled up in a black touring car with its curtains drawn. Suddenly one man jumped out of the car and stood behind Cassidy and ordered him to put his hands up. Officer Cassidy attempted to draw his revolver, but he was unable to clear the holster before the man opened fire. Officer Cassidy was hit in the chest, the bullet passing through his heart. He collapsed to the sidewalk and died before a doctor arrived ten minutes later. The gunman then turned and fired upon Ernest Sommers mortally wounding him before grabbing the $8000.00 and fleeing the scene. Neither Officer Cassidy of Mr. Sommers regained conscious and were unable to provide any details of the events.

On May 3, 1922, Charles Conroy was arrested for the murders. On May 4, 1922, he was held to the Grand Jury without bail by Judge Rooney. On July 13, 1922, the charge against Conroy was stricken off the record by Judge Caverly.

Officer Cassidy was waked at his residence located at 631 South Hermitage Avenue and he was laid to rest on April 6, 1922 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Probationary Patrolman Ernest H. Cassidy, born October 9, 1895, received a Temporary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 5, 1919 prior to his Probationary Appointment to the Department on August 12, 1921.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5867.

Patrolman Bartholomew Cavanaugh

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 Nov 1888
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
15 Dec 1898
Cause of Death:
Fall - Down Staircase
Age:
42
End of Watch:
15 Dec 1898
Unit of Assignment:
District 2, 4th Precinct - Cottage Grove
Date of Birth:
25 May 1856
Served:
10 years, 0 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 5
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Bartholomew Cavanaugh, Star # Unknown, aged 42 years, was a 10 year, 0 month, 10 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2, 4th Precinct - Cottage Grove.

On December 15, 1898, Officer Cavanaugh was investigating a burglary in a building located at the corner of 22nd Street and Indiana Avenue. He had believed the burglars still to be in the building. While investigating, he went to the rear of the building, while inside an areaway he stumbled and fell down a stair case. He sustained a broken neck and fractured skull as a result of the fall and was found unconscious a short time later by two other police officers. Officer Cavanaugh was transported to Mercy Hospital, but died before arriving.

Officer Cavanaugh was waked at his residence located at No. 3548 5th Avenue (present day 3548 South Wells Street) and he was laid to rest in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Bartholomew Cavanaugh, born on May 25, 1856, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 5, 1888.

Officer Cavanaugh was survived by his wife, Anne and four children.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On July 17, 2018, Officer Cavanaugh's star was retired by Superintendent of Police Eddie T. Johnson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Michael Anthony Ceriale

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 May 1997
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
17429
Incident Date:
15 Aug 1998
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
26
End of Watch:
21 Aug 1998
Unit of Assignment:
2nd District - Wentworth
Date of Birth:
21 Jan 1972
Served:
1 year, 3 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 24-W: 21

Incident Details:

Patrolman Michael Anthony Ceriale, Star #17429, aged 26 years, was a 1 year, 3 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 2nd District - Wentworth.

On August 15, 1998, at 3:38 p.m., Officer Ceriale and his partner, Patrolman Joseph Ferenzi, were conducting an undercover narcotics surveillance on Gangster Disciple gang members: Jonathan Tolliver, Willie Hunter, George Alexander, and Robert Brandt. The officers were conducting drug surveillance near the Robert Taylor Homes located at 4101 South Federal Street. They were hiding near some bushes on Root Street when Brandt noticed the officers. Brandt alerted Hunter and Tolliver to the presence of the officers. Then, Hunter and Tolliver ran out of the building with their guns drawn; Tolliver fired one fatal shot. The shot struck Officer Ceriale in the abdomen just below his bulletproof vest. Officer Ceriale was transported to Cook County Hospital where he underwent five surgeries and used more than 200 pints of blood donated in several blood drives. On August 21, 1998, at 3:39 a.m. he succumbed to his injuries at Cook County Hospital.

In total seven men were arrested in connection with Officer Ceriale’s murder. Ezra Evans, age 27, who illegally supplied the gang members with 13 guns, including the weapon used to murder Officer Ceriale was sentenced to 25 months in prison. Robert Brandt, age 20, accepted a plea deal, in exchange for surrendering the weapon used to murder Officer Ceriale to police, prosecutors agreed to dismiss the drug and weapons charges against him. Brandt pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Hunter, age 25 and Alexander, age 21, pleaded guilty to 1st degree murder and were each sentenced to 30 years in prison. Tolliver, age 19, stood trial and during jury deliberation one jury member refused to change his vote for acquittal and the trial ended in a hung jury. Tolliver was retried and found guilty of 1st degree murder in addition to the manufacture and delivery of cocaine. He was sentenced to 60 years in prison.

Officer Ceriale was waked at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home located at 6150 North Cicero Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Cathedral located at 843 North Oakley Avenue and he was laid to rest on August 26, 1998 in All Saints Catholic Cemetery, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Patrolman Michael Anthony Ceriale, born January 21, 1972, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 5, 1997. He attended the Jackson Street Police Academy and was in Recruit Class 97-2.

Officer Ceriale was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his parents: Anthony Morris and Maria (nee Retelskyj) and grandmother, Anna Retelskyj.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #C516005.

On November 6, 1998, Officer Ceriale's star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Ceriale's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

In memory of Officer Ceriale a mounted unit horse was named Mikey C. in his honor in 2003. Tragically, Mikey C. died in the performance of duty on August 29, 2011 at North Avenue Beach from natural causes.

Patrolman Joseph Edward Chapman Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Feb 1929
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6239
Incident Date:
08 May 1960
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
57
End of Watch:
08 May 1960
Unit of Assignment:
Crime Prevention Division - Youth Bureau / Motion Picture Section
Date of Birth:
03 Jun 1903
Served:
31 years, 3 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 6
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 61-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph Edward Chapman, Jr., Star #6239, aged 57 years, was a 31 year, 3 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Crime Prevention Division - Youth Bureau, detailed to the Motion Picture Section.

On May 8, 1960, at 3:00 p.m., Officer Chapman, while off duty, was at the Hi-Spot Liquor Store located at 5302 South Indiana Avenue. Officer Chapman went to visit with the owner, Herman Baum who was a personal friend, and to buy some soft drinks for his grandchildren who were coming to his home for a Mother's Day party. Officer Chapman and Baum were eating lunch in the store and after consuming the food and soda, Officer Chapman remained in the store visiting. At 4:45 p.m. Officer Chapman went to the rear of the store to use the washroom. Baum remained out front when Larry C. Harvey, age 26 of New Haven, Connecticut, entered and walked to the rear counter. Baum noticed a gun in Harvey's hand as he vaulted the counter announcing, “This is a stick-up,“ pointing the gun at Baum and his clerk, Sterling Bitting. At this time, Officer Chapman heard the commotion and came out from the back of the store and announced his office. Harvey responded by shooting and a gun battle ensued. Harvey fired at Officer Chapman three times from close range. Officer Chapman was struck in the stomach and as he fell he was shot two more times striking him in the left leg and left foot. Officer Chapman returned fire as he fell hitting Harvey five times. Harvey was shot in his left arm, left thigh, and groin. Officer Chapman was transported to Provident Hospital by Squadrol 287 where he underwent surgery. He passed away during surgery and was pronounced dead by Dr. Small at 5:00 p.m. on May 8, 1960. Larry Harvey was also transported to Provident Hospital where he was treated. He was later transferred to the Bridewell Hospital where he died at 1:30 a.m. on May 9, 1960.

Officer Chapman was waked at Crook Funeral Home located at 4638 South Indiana Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Martin's Episcopal Church located at 5842 South Princeton Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 12, 1960 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph Edward Chapman, Jr., born June 3, 1903, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 2, 1929. Officer Chapman was scheduled to retire on July 2, 1960. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. Ironically, the Credible Mention was awarded for a gun fight Chapman had on March 4, 1956 in the same liquor store where he was slain. Officer Chapman served in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 19th, and 27th Districts, Headquarters, Morals Division, and the Crime Prevention Division during his career.

Officer Chapman was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Francis (CPD), age 53 and daughters: Carol, Doris, Frances, Frederica, Josephine and Pauline.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department Accident Report No. 730476-7, Central Complaint Room No. 43961 and Station Complaint No. 796276. Incident disseminated via Teletype Message No. 25776 and 257789

In January, 1961, Officer Chapman's star was retired by Superintendent Orlando W. Wilson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Chapman's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

In June 1962, the police department honored Officer Chapman's memory by naming the brand new M-6 police boat in the Department's Marine Unit after him.

Sergeant John Chiska

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
888
Incident Date:
05 Apr 1928
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
47
End of Watch:
05 Apr 1928
Unit of Assignment:
31st District - Cragin
Date of Birth:
12 May 1880
Served:
21 years, 11 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
025 - Grand Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Bohemian National Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-11
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 21-W: 1

Incident Details:

Sergeant John Chiska, Star #888, aged 47 years, was a 21 year, 11 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 31st District - Cragin.

On April 5, 1928, 9:35 a.m., Sergeant Chiska, head of the plainclothes detail at the Cragin Police Station, had been on duty for only five minutes when he received a complaint about loiterers. The complainant, Kasimir Wiejaczka, the owner of a candy store located at 2118 North Laurel Street called the station to report three men lurking outside the store. Sergeant Chiska, working in plainclothes, got into his squad car and responded to the scene without backup. Upon arrival at the candy store, Mr. Wiejaczka pointed out three men across the street in front of 2216 North Lorel Avenue. Sergeant Chiska walked across the street and when he arrived. Upon confronting the men, two of the men, Stanley Walker and Joseph Papciak announced a robbery, attempting to rob the Sergeant. Sergeant Chiska announced his office and placed two of the men in custody, but was taken by surprise when a third man, Steve Cygan, alias Debs, drew a pistol and fired on him. Sergeant Chiska was struck in his right hand, the bullet passing through and striking him again in the abdomen. He fell to the sidewalk falling unconscious. As Sergeant Chiska lay on the sidewalk helpless Cygan fired three more shots into him before the men jumped into a vehicle and sped away. Witnesses observed the men switch cars down the street from the crime before fleeing. As the bandits fled, Sergeant Chiska was rushed to Keystone Hospital located at 1623 North Kostner Avenue. While at the hospital, he received multiple blood transfusions with blood donated by fellow officers. Due to the heroic efforts of the Chicago Fire Department’s Squad 6, they kept him alive using a pullmotor. Unfortunately, their efforts to stabilize him were unsuccessful and he succumbed to his injuries at 2:15 p.m. later that afternoon.

On April 12, 1928, two of the men, Stanley Walker and Joseph Papciak, were arrested and on April 13th held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. On April 28, 1928, Walker and Papciak were booked for the murder of Sergeant Chiska. On April 29, 1928, the Coroner recommended the arrest of Steve Cygan, whom Walker and Papciak implicated as the last of the trio. Steve Cygan was apprehended, stood trial and found guilty of the murder of Sergeant Chiska. He was sentenced to death by electrocution to be carried out on June 16, 1939. His execution was stayed by Governor Henry Horner to July 21, 1931 for appeal to the Supreme Court, which was denied. On October 13, 1939, Cygan was executed in the electric chair at Cook County Jail. On November 26, 1928, the case against Walker was nolle prossed. On the same day Papciak was found guilty and he was sentenced to 20 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge J. Sullivan.

Sergeant Chiska was waked at his residence located at 3418 South Springfield Avenue, his funeral mass was held at the Lawndale Masonic Temple located at 2300 South Millard Avenue and he was laid to rest on April 9, 1928 in Bohemian National Cemetery, 5255 North Pulaski Road, Chicago, Illinois.

Sergeant John Chiska, born May 12, 1880, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 9, 1906. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. On February 13, 1914, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915. On June 28, 1921, he was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Chiska was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, Polacki Lodge No. 630 Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Master Mason and a member of Oriental Lodge No. 33 AF&AM and the Marnot Haftic Club. He was survived by his wife, Rose (nee Belsky); children: Loretta and Lucille; mother, Marie and siblings: Edward, Frank and William.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #9653.

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