LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

  • The results are being filtered by the character: D
1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman Patrick J. Daley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
08 May 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1178
Incident Date:
27 Jun 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
27 Jun 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 23 - West North
Date of Birth:
25 Dec 1893
Served:
2 year, 1 month, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 17
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 8-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Patrick J. Daley, Star #1178, aged 32 years, was a 2 year, 1 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 23 - West North.

On June 27, 1926, 2:30 a.m., Officer Daley, in plain clothes, was walking home from the West North Avenue Station when he was shot by an unknown person. Officer Daley lived with his cousin, Sergeant Dennis Lyons, at 910 North Springfield Avenue. Hearing the sound of gunfire, Sergeant Lyons was startled, and went outside to investigate. The sergeant found Officer Daley motionless on the sidewalk of West Iowa Street approximately 30 feet east of 900 South Springfield Avenue. Lyons ran over to Daley and discovered he had been shot in chest with the bullet striking his heart. Sergeant Lyons immediately summoned help. A Detective Bureau Squad rushed to the scene and attempted to transport Officer Daley to the hospital, but he succumbed to his injuries enroute.

However, a canvas resulted in the following details. Officer Daley fell wounded in front of Dennis Sherlock’s residence. In a statement given by Mr. Sherlock, he heard someone fumbling at his front door at around 2:30 a.m. Before opening the door, he called out to the person but received no answer. Investigators surmised that Officer Daley must have spotted the man outside Mr. Sherlock’s door and ordered him to stop. This came after Sherlock told investigators that he thought he hear another voice command an order just before the shots rang out. The full circumstances of Officer Daley’s murder and the identity of his assailant remain unknown.

Officer Daley was waked at his residence located at 910 North Springfield Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Angels Church located at 3808 West Iowa Street and he was laid to rest in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Patrick J. Daley, born December 25, 1893, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 8, 1924.

Officer Daley served in the American Expeditionary Forces and was a veteran of World War I. He was also a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the Veterans of the American Expeditionary Forces. Officer Daley was survived by his mother, Katherine Casey, siblings: Daniel J. Lillian M. and Timothy E. and cousin, Dennis Lyons (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7918.

Patrolman Edward R. DaMay

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
05 Mar 1929
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle (Pursuit)
Age:
37
End of Watch:
07 Mar 1929
Unit of Assignment:
4th District - Stanton
Date of Birth:
02 Jan 1892
Served:
6 years, 9 months, 0 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Greenwood Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward R. DaMay, Star # Unknown, aged 37 years, was a 6 year, 9 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th District - Stanton.

On March 5, 1929, Officer DaMay was patrolling on his police motorcycle when he spotted a speeding vehicle. The officer was passing a streetcar in pursuit of the vehicle at 3148 South Cottage Grove Avenue, when a wheel of his motorcycle slipped on the wet cobblestone street causing him to lose control. While traveling at 35 mph, Officer DaMay fell off the motorcycle and then slid the length of the streetcar track. His left leg was crushed under the weight of the motorcycle and he sustained severe damage to it. The damage to his left leg were so severe that if he had survived, he would be unable to ever ride a motorcycle again. Officer DaMay was transported to a local hospital where he succumbed to his injuries 2 days later on March 7, 1929.

Officer DaMay was laid to rest on March 11, 1929 in Mount Greenwood Cemetery, 2900 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Edward DaMay, born January 2, 1892, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 7, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer DaMay was survived by his wife, Anna and daughter, age 4.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman Martin Emmett Darcy Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Aug 1955
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6444
Incident Date:
27 Sep 1982
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
52
End of Watch:
27 Sep 1982
Unit of Assignment:
22nd District - Morgan Park
Date of Birth:
05 Sep 1930
Served:
27 years, 1 month, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
022 - Morgan Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 37
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 35-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Martin Emmett Darcy, Jr., Star #6444, aged 52 years, was a 27 year, 1 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 22nd District - Morgan Park.

On September 27, 1982, at 1:00 p.m., Officer Darcy and his partner, Patrolman Edward Ryan, were working beat 2273 patrolling the South Side Beverly neighborhood when they responded to a robbery-in-progress call. A gunman, Aaron Washington, alias Jesse Lee Anderson, had entered the Southtown Health Food store located at 2148 West 95th Street and demanded all the big bills from the register. The cashier, wife of the store's manager, Emil Mahler, complied with the offenders demands and gave him the contents of the cash register. After Washington left, Mrs. Mahler alerted her husband who pursued the robber and was shot once in the abdomen but was not seriously injured. Washington then jumped into a gold Chevrolet and made good his escape.

Mr. Mahler was able to give a full description of Washington and his vehicle, to Officers Darcy and Ryan. While touring the area, the officers spotted a gold colored car matching the description given. They pursued the vehicle to a parking lot located at 95th Street and Western Avenue. Washington exited the vehicle and fled on foot to the nearby home of Kathleen Frantz, age 30, of 2637 West 97th Street. He gained entry to the home and ordered Frantz to hand over her car keys hoping to flee in a different vehicle. When Ms. Frantz didn’t cooperate, Washington shot her in the shoulder and fled out a back door. As Officer Darcy was walking in a gangway between the two houses, Washington spotted him as he fled the house and fired his weapon. Officer Darcy was struck once and fell to the ground mortally wounded. A neighbor, Michael Gasea, a part time Evergreen Park Police Officer, heard the gunfire and rushed to the scene. He was able to assist Ms. Frantz, saving her from further harm. Officer Darcy was transported to Little Company of Mary Hospital by CFD Ambulance #29 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Yario at 1:30 p.m. on September 27, 1982.

As Washington continued to flee, he encountered Patrolman Jerry Johnson, who was one of the many responding officers searching the area for Washington. Washington once again opened fire striking Johnson in the left side of his neck, right arm right side of his chest and in the middle of his back. Johnson was transported Little Company of Mary Hospital where he was treated and eventually released. He was left with neurological damage from the incident. While fleeing after shooting Officer Johnson, Washington engaged responding officers in a gun battle. He was shot four times and was killed.

Officer Darcy was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Christina's Catholic Church located at 11005 South Homan Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 1, 1982 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman Martin Emmett Darcy, Jr., born September 5, 1930, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 22 1955. He earned 11 Honorable Mentions and 3 Complimentary Letters during his career. Officer Darcy began his career in the Gresham District as a patrolman. In 1982, the 27 year veteran was nearing retirement and asked to be reassigned from clerical duties to patrol duties in the Morgan Park District. He wanted to end his career the way he had started it.

Officer Darcy served in the Armed Forces, was a veteran of World War II and the Korean War, and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Darcy was survived by his wife, Patricia (nee Costello); children: Martin Emmet, III, age 13, Patricia Mary Darcy, age 12; step-children: Christina Marie Fairbanks (nee Caden), age 31, Diane Marie Higgins (nee Caden), age 35 and Paula Michelle Cadan (CPD), age 33 and brother, Michael (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #D349254.

On October 20, 1982, Officer Darcy's star was retired by Superintendent Richard Brzeczek and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Darcy's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

On December 7, 1982, In memory of his sacrifice the Chicago Transit Authority's River Road Rapid Transit Station, located at 5801 N River Road, Rosemont, IL was dedicated and named in Officer Darcy’s honor. A dedication plaque was erected to be permanently displayed.

Sergeant Richard Davenport Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Sep 1960
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2280
Incident Date:
04 Aug 1986
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
54
End of Watch:
04 Aug 1986
Unit of Assignment:
9th District - Deering
Date of Birth:
25 Oct 1931
Served:
25 years, 10 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 42
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 33-E: 17

Incident Details:

Sergeant Richard Davenport, Jr., Star #2280, aged 54 years, was a 25 year, 10 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 9th District - Deering.

On August 4, 1986, at 10:30 p.m., Sergeant Davenport, while off duty, was alerted to an attempted auto theft of his son's car by five youths and that his son was shot at by one of the five offenders. Four youths were identified by Sergeant Davenport’s son at 93rd Street and Stony Island Avenue. He identified himself as a police officer and began to question the five youths as they were lined up against a brick wall. As Davenport was searching the group for weapons, one of the youths began to fight with Sergeant Davenport’s son. As the sergeant attempted to break up the fight, Dwayne Thomas, came off the wall and pulled a gun. He fired four rounds from his .22 caliber pistol. The sergeant was shot three times and was struck in the mouth, chest and left calf. One of the other youths was struck by a stray bullet in the leg. During the melee, Sergeant Davenport’s son ran into a liquor store and called his mother as the other youth fled on foot. According to a witness, police arrived about 10 minutes later. Sergeant Davenport was transported to South Chicago Community Hospital by beat 672 where he was pronounced dead by Dr's Okezie and Rosenthal at 11:27 p.m. on August 4, 1986. While doctors tried to save the sergeant a boy walked into the ER with a gunshot wound to his leg. Fellow officers suspected him to be one of the five youths and questioned him. The youth gave up the names of the other youths and they were all apprehended.

Dwayne Thomas was later arrested and charged as an adult with murder. On June 15, 1987, Thomas was acquitted of Davenport's murder after claiming he thought Sergeant Davenport was a gang member intent on killing his friend. Another 18-year-old youth was arrested and charged with aggravated assault with a firearm. The other three youths were released without charges.

The incident began at 10:00 p.m. when Sergeant Davenports son received a phone call from a friend who told him that several youths were tampering with his car at 90th Street and Constance Avenue. The two friends went to the car and found no one there. They got into the car and began driving around the neighborhood looking for the offenders. They found the five youths five blocks away and when the sergeant’s sons exited the car and approached the youths, one of them pulled a gun and fired a shot at him but missed. The two fled in the car and went to the sergeant’s home to tell him what had happened.

Sergeant Davenport was waked at Doty Nash Funeral Home located at 8620 South Stony Island Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Cosmopolitan Community Church located at 5249 South Wabash Avenue and he was laid to rest on August 7, 1986 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Sergeant Richard (NMN) Davenport, Jr., born October 25, 1931, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 19, 1960. He was promoted to Sergeant in 1984.

Sergeant Davenport served in the Armed Forces from 1952 thru 1954, was a veteran of the Korean War and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Evelyn Raye (nee Johnson), age 45; son, Richard III, age 18 and brothers: Artie and Ray.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #H343675.

On September 23, 1986, Sergeant Davenport's star was retired by Superintendent Fred Rice and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Sergeant Davenport's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Lieutenant James Francis Day

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
10 Sep 1891
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
261
Incident Date:
19 Sep 1934
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Cardiac Arrest
Age:
71
End of Watch:
19 Sep 1934
Unit of Assignment:
14th District - Gresham
Date of Birth:
29 Jun 1863
Served:
43 years, 0 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
006 - Gresham

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. James Catholic Church and Cemetery - Lemont, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 37
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 10-W: 8

Incident Details:

Lieutenant James Francis Day, Star #261, aged 71 years, was a 43 year, 0 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 14th District - Gresham.

On September 19, 1934, shortly after 11:30 p.m., Lieutenant Day was robbed and beaten. His body was found early the next morning in a vacant lot near 8545 South Green Street, within 100 yards of the Gresham District Station. Lieutenant Day was struck several times about the head and body with a club. Evidence showed Lieutenant Day put up a fight for his life after he was attacked from behind during a robbery. He was struck in the back of the head; his right hand was severely bruised and then suffered a heart attack. Lieutenant Day's pockets were turned inside out and his wallet was gone when he was found. His wife reported that he cashed his paycheck and had a large sum of money on him when he left his home for work. His empty wallet and revolver, still in his coat pocket, were found at the scene.

William Duba, age 26, a former inmate of an insane asylum was later arrested for loitering at 63rd Street and St. Louis Avenue. While in custody, he gave a full confession to his part in the murder. Duba gave intimate details of the crime and related that he struck Day in the back of the head with a tree limb. Detectives were reluctant to believe Duba due to his known past of mental instability, but he was able to lead detectives to the exact spot Day’s body was found. Detectives continued to conduct a search for the suspected killer, William Randolph, with a bruised eye after he was seen by Patrolman Willie Burke running from spot where Day’s body was found. On November 30, 1934, Randolph was apprehended and arrested for the murder of Lieutenant Day. He stood trial before Judge Charles F. McKinley, was found guilty, and sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.

Lieutenant Day was waked at his residence located at 5409 South Michigan Avenue, his funeral mass was held in Requiem at St. Anne Roman Catholic Church located at 153 West Garfield Boulevard and he was laid to rest on September 24, 1934 in Sag Bridge Cemetery which is now known as St. James Catholic Church and Cemetery, 10600 South Archer Avenue, Lemont, Illinois.

Lieutenant James Francis Day, born June 29, 1863, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 10, 1891. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. On March 14, 1898, he was given a Civil Service promotion. On March 24, 1904, he was promoted to Patrol Sergeant. On April 6, 1917, he was promoted to Lieutenant.

Lieutenant Day was survived by his wife, Minnie M. (nee McMahon); children: Adelaide Murphy, Bernice O’Grady, Dolores McMahon, Reverend L. Dudley, Leo P., Madeline Hannagan, Roy J. Sister Edmunda.

Detective Sergeant Frank Dealy

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
28 Jan 1903
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
539
Incident Date:
05 Oct 1914
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
48
End of Watch:
05 Oct 1914
Unit of Assignment:
District 20, 32nd Precinct - West Chicago
Date of Birth:
06 Feb 1866
Served:
11 years, 8 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 44
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 64-E: 12

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant Frank Dealy, Star #539, aged 48 years, was an 11 year, 8 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 20, 32nd Precinct - West Chicago.

On October 5, 1914, at 12:00 a.m., Detective Sergeant Dealy was on duty and working with his partner, Detective Sergeant Christopher Hughes. The Desk Sergeant had become ill and Hughes was called to fill in temporarily as the Desk Sergeant. Dealy decided to go out on patrol alone and arranged to meet up with Hughes a half-hour later. Hughes was just finishing up when he received a call informing him of a shooting that had occurred involving his partner.

At 12:20 a.m., Detective Sergeant Dealy was walking his beat when he observed two suspicious men sitting on a curb at Grand Avenue and Halsted Street. Sergeant Dealy decided to stop and question the men as to their business. When he approached them both men drew revolvers and began firing. Sergeant Dealy was struck four times in the abdomen and collapsed to the ground. Patrons in the surrounding businesses came out to investigate after hearing the gunfire. They saw what had just happened and several gave chase to the gunmen as they fled. The gunmen led the citizens on a foot pursuit and were able to make good their escape as they weaved in and out of railroad freight cars, eventually eluding their pursuers. At the same time, other citizens summoned for police. A police ambulance was dispatched. Upon arrival, Detective Sergeant Dealy said, “Call for my wife, send for a priest, I am dying.” The ambulance loaded and rushed him to St. Elizabeth Hospital where he died at 5:00 a.m. the same day. His wife was at his bedside when he passed.

After the shooting, Dealy was able to identify one of the shooters as Chris Maratto of 1321 DeKoven Street. However, Dealy changed his mind saying he wasn’t sure and questioned his memory before falling unconscious. Dealy never awoke again and could provide no more details. A manhunt for the gunman started immediately after the shooting and eight suspects were arrested including: Fred Alred, age 18; Joseph Binbo of 835 South Racine Avenue; Joseph Colucci; Peter Dicoumacas, age 19 of 525 West Monroe Street; Chris Maratto, and John “Schultz” Sulinsky.

On November 5, 1914, Colucci and Sulinsky were held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. On November 15, 1914, the Grand Jury returned No Bills on both men.

Detective Sergeant Dealy was waked at his residence located at 856 North Lawndale Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 8, 1914 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant Frank Dealy, born February 6, 1866, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 28, 1903. On November 12, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective by order of the city council on November 13, 1913.

Sergeant Dealy was survived by his wife, Gertrude and five children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3393.

Patrolman Edward E. Dean

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Oct 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4480
Incident Date:
11 Jun 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
48
End of Watch:
11 Jun 1925
Unit of Assignment:
District 33 - Summerdale
Date of Birth:
22 Dec 1876
Served:
18 years, 7 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
024 - Rogers Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 23-E: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward E. Dean, Star #4480, aged 48 years, was an 18 year, 7 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 33 - Summerdale.

On June 11, 1925, at 3:10 a.m., Officer Dean was on duty and detailed to escort a clerk, Richard Kane of the Chicago Motor Coach Company located at 124 West Rosemont Avenue to the bank with the company's payroll. While in the office with King, four masked men, one armed with a shotgun, entered and were intent on stealing the $10,000.00 payroll. Officer Dean drew his revolver and exchanged shots with the gunman almost immediately upon the robbers’ arrival. Officer Dean prevented the robbery as the robbers scattered and fled the scene, but not before Officer Dean was shot. He was struck multiple times in the abdomen and was rushed to the hospital. He underwent an emergency surgery and blood transfusion. A medical student, J. Robert Chore, donated the blood. Despite the efforts of doctors, Officer Dean succumbed to his injuries dying the same day.

The four robbers made good their escape and have never been identified.

Officer Dean’s funeral mass was held at the chapel at D.M. Carroll undertaking rooms located at 1158 North Clark Street and he was laid to rest in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Edward E. Dean, born December 22, 1876, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 26, 1906.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7891.

Patrolman Stuart N. Dean

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
10 Sep 1887
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
72
Incident Date:
18 Jul 1916
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
59
End of Watch:
18 Jul 1916
Unit of Assignment:
District 18, 29th Precinct - Warren
Date of Birth:
06 Sep 1856
Served:
28 years, 10 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Arlington Cemetery - Elmhurst, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 47
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 38-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Stuart N. Dean, Star #72, aged 59 years, was a 28 year, 10 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 18, 29th Precinct - Warren.

On July 18th, 1916, at 5:10 a.m., Officer Dean was shot and killed in a standoff with a mentally unstable man, Henry MacIntyre.

At 4:30 a.m. the same day, Henry McIntyre, who lived in an apartment located at 320 North Irving Avenue (present day Bell Avenue) went outside into his backyard carrying a rifle. A neighbor, Mrs. Bedford, had also exited her home and had observed McIntyre outside with the rifle. She thought it was strange, but carried on with her business, as she set it down to his eccentricities. When McIntyre laid eyes on her, he raised the rifle and fired at point blank range across the fence. The bullet grazed Mrs. Bedford’s arm and she ran into the house screaming. At this time, another neighbor, Mrs. Shaw, living in the same building as McIntyre stepped outside to see what the screaming was about. McIntyre then fired at her but missed. McIntyre then walked to the front of the apartment building and was joined by his wife who was also carrying a shotgun. Mrs. Shaw now inside her home peered out the window and observed McIntyre chanting as he gazed around looking for someone to kill. Seeing no one around in the early morning hours, he began to fire at random through the windows of his neighbor’s homes.

Hampton Knox, whom lived two doors north, was awakened by the shooting and got up to see what was going on. He went to his front door and opened it. While standing in the doorway, with his wife directly behind him, McIntyre caught sight of him and fired. Mr. Knox was shot through the chest, collapsed to the floor and died instantly. His wife seeing what had just happened, attempted to pull him into the house and as she turned she was struck by a bullet in the back. A minute later, C. W. Matthews who lived three doors down from McIntyre, was standing at his front door when a bullet struck him in the head. At the same time Michael Doladee, a night watchman for the Vulcan Iron Works across the way, phoned “Main 13” to call for police help. Patrolman Chris Hemmick was working his beat when the shooting started and narrowly escaped being hit. Officer Hemmick ran to a patrol box and notified the Warren Avenue Station of what was taking place. A signal service wagon was the first to arrive on scene being dispatched after Mr. Doladee’s call. The wagon drove by the McIntyre’s home as it responded and was fired upon by McIntyre. McIntyre hit a horse and the side of the wagon. The policeman driving withdrew from the wagon and prepared for an attack.

At this time, McIntyre stepped to the rear of a house located at 315 North Oakley Avenue. Mrs. Josephine Overmeyer had been awakened by her baby and was about to bathe the child when she stepped out onto her back porch to investigate. McIntyre saw her on the porch and fired. She was struck through the throat and died. It was at this time that Captain Wesley H. Westbrook of the Warren Avenue Station arrived on scene and called for more men from neighboring stations. By the end of the incident more than 150 officers will have responded to the scene. Police had set up a cordon around the building as McIntyre and his wife barricaded themselves inside the residence.

As officers arrived on scene they took heavy fire from the front window of the residence. Captain Westbrook assembled eight men, Patrolmen Patrick Cassidy, Stuart Dean, Frank Freemuth, John Lavin, John Moran and Sergeants Edward Clements, John Coghlan and Grover Crabtree. Captain Westbrook decided that a rear entry would give them a better advantage and proceeded to the rear with his men. Once there they fired more than fifty rounds through the rear door. The Officer Lavin stepped up and using an axe smashed the door in, which opened to the kitchen. They found the kitchen to be empty as well as a hallway where another closed door separated them from a bedroom where McIntyre and his wife were. The fired another fusillade of bullets through the door. When all was quiet Officer McMahon took the axe and smashed in the door. The door fell onto a heavy dresser, which had been pushed up against the door. Captain Westbrook stepped in and began to move the dresser when the muzzle of a rifle appeared from behind a curtain that covered a closet to the right of the door. It was only a few feet away from his head when he screamed “Drop.” All of the officers had dropped except for Officer Dean who walked across the kitchen just as McIntyre began firing. Officer Dean was shot in the chest and collapsed.

Captain Westbrook ordered the officers to fallback and said, “One is enough. Take it easy.“ Officers Crabtree and Freemuth pulled back carrying Dean’s body and as Officer Clements stepped out of the back door he was shot in the back and thigh. Once the officers made it to the yard, Officer Crabtree was struck in the arm and leg. As the officers’ fell back, the McIntyre’s were able to prop the broken door back into place and fortify it with various pieces of furniture. By this time more calls for backup were sent to First Deputy Schuettler’s office and the Detective Bureau. Fifty men responded and another fifty civilian volunteers were organized into a posse and stationed at various points around the building. A number of officer took up positions in the second story windows of the Vulcan Iron Works building.

After waiting a long while for McIntyre to show his face, Captain Westbrook made the decision to force them out of the house. Westbrook phoned General Superintendent Charles C. Healy and asked permission to blow up the house. Superintendent Healy authorized the action and the superintendent at the Artesian Stone Quarry, Allen Foley, located at Grand and California Avenues, supplied ten sticks of dynamite along with two explosive technicians. The explosive technicians and the Captain with a squad of men made their way to the apartment above McIntyres. Once there they met Mr. Amos, his wife and four children who were hiding. The officers quietly slipped them out the back while officers surrounding the building evacuated everyone within 150 yards of the building. The officers then set off several three different charges of dynamite. After the third explosion Patrolman Ed Hughes, who was off duty at the time, said, “I’m going to get the guy” and rushed the house along with Officer Freemuth. Once inside they found Mrs. McIntyre's body lying just outside the barricaded door. Her body was riddled with bullets, some of which had blown away part of her skull. Mr. McIntyre was still standing, but was disoriented from the explosions. Still, he attempted to raise his weapon and take aim at the police. In response Officer Hughes fired at point blank range and mortally wounded him before he could get a shot off. McIntyre was then taken to Washington Boulevard hospital where he died shortly after arriving.

Henry McIntyre, age 38, was born in Cairo Illinois. He worked as a stationary engineer and had purchased the rifle he used in the standoff a year prior from Charles Heinreich of 750 South State Street for $12.00. McIntyre had a history of mental instability and had threatened to kill Judge and had previously served six month in jail. A warrant for his arrest was issued the day before the incident. His neighbor, Mr. Henry Bedford, whose wife was shot by McIntyre during the incident, swore it out. The police had come looking for him the night before, but he was not home. After the shooting a cartridge belt was found around the waist of McIntyre and his wife. McIntyre left a note that read, “I'm following a direct order from God to start sending people home to him.“

Officer Dean was waked at his residence located at 3338 West Fulton Street, his funeral mass was held at Warren Avenue Congressional Church was laid to rest on July 20, 1916 in Arlington Cemetery, 401 East Lake Street, Elmhurst, Illinois.

Patrolman Stuart N. Dean, born September 6, 1856, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 10, 1887.

Officer Dean was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, Illinois Humane Society and Illinois Welcome Lodge No. 1 Knights of Pythias. He was survived by his wife, Mary A. (nee Snowden) and siblings: Anna Church and Legrand.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3418.

Patrolman Mathias J. Degan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Dec 1884
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
648
Incident Date:
04 May 1886
Cause of Death:
Explosion - Bomb
Age:
34
End of Watch:
04 May 1886
Unit of Assignment:
3rd Precinct - West Lake Street Station
Date of Birth:
1852
Served:
1 year, 4 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Boniface Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 17
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 54-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, Star #648, aged 34 years, was a 1 year, 4 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd Precinct - West Lake Street Station.

On May 4, 1886, Officer Degan was with other officers assigned to disperse protesters near Haymarket Square. A bomb was thrown and exploded amidst the officers. The explosion was then followed by an intense gun battle. Officer Degan was mortally wounded by shrapnel from the bomb blast and died almost immediately thereafter. Officer Degan was the first of eight officers to die in what is known as the historic Haymarket Tragedy.

Eight men were arrested and charged with the officers’ murders. Seven were convicted of murder and sentenced to death. The other one was sentenced to 15 years in prison. On November 11, 1887, four of them were executed by hanging. The day before one of the suspects killed himself in his cell with a smuggled dynamite cap, which he detonated in his mouth. The other three were pardoned by Governor John P. Altgeld in 1893.

Nine police officers died after or were killed during the Haymarket Riot labor dispute. The officers were at the scene of a civil disorder when the rioters opened fire and threw a bomb into the crowd. Seven policemen suffered fatal wounds, two policemen suffered serious injury which would later lead to their death and 70 other people were injured by the explosion and ensuing gunfire.

The officers who were killed in or as a result of the Haymarket Riot, in order of their death, include:

  • Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, End of Watch May 4, 1886
  • Patrolman John J. Barrett, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman George F. Miller, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, End of Watch May 8, 1886
  • Patrolman Michael Sheehan, End of Watch May 9, 1886
  • Patrolman Nels Hansen, End of Watch May 14, 1886
  • Patrolman Thomas Redden, End of Watch May 16, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy O'Sullivan, End of Watch June 14, 1888
  • Patrolman Patrick Hartford, End of Watch November 26, 1897

Officer Degan was waked at his residence located at No. 637 South Canal Street (present day 1500 South Canal Street) and he was laid to rest on May 7, 1886 in St. Boniface Cemetery, 4901 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, born in 1852, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 15, 1884.

Officer Degan was a widower who was survived by his son.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #516 and Case #2743.

In response to the tragic events of May 4, 1886 a commemorative nine-foot (2.7 meter) bronze statue of a Chicago policeman was commissioned to honor the sacrifice of the policemen who lost their lives that fateful night. The statue was designed by Frank Batchelder of St. Paul Minnesota in 1889 and sculpted by sculptor Johannes Gelert of New York, New York. The statue's marble pedestal was ordered to have an inscription on it. The inscription is the command that Captain William Ward delivered in the Haymarket just before the bomb was thrown that fateful night: "In the name of the People of Illinois, I command peace." The statue was funded by private funds raised by the Union League Club of Chicago. The statue would become the first known monument erected in the United States honoring policemen. Erected in the middle of Haymarket Square located on Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, the statue was unveiled on May 30, 1889. The unveiling was conducted by Frank Degan, the son of Officer Mathias Degan who was killed in the Haymarket Affair. Over the years the statue would be moved seven times, it would also be repaired and rebuilt several times due to vandalism.

  • Location #1 - Haymarket Square (May 30, 1889 thru July, 1900): Haymarket Square was the first location in which the statue would be erected. It was placed in the middle of Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, as seen in the image above. The statue interfered with the flow of traffic in this busy area, and it became an object of vandalism. As a result, it was moved in 1900 about one mile west, to Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue, near Union Park.

  • Location #2 - Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue (July, 1900 thru 1928): The statue remained at its second location for just over 27 years. A medallion, which is evident in the photo above, is located just above the inscription. Also visible are two white dots just below the inscription. Those two dots are of the original mounting holes for the medallion. It is believed that due to vandalism, the medallion was moved higher up the monuments pedestal. On May 4, 1927, the 41st anniversary of the Haymarket affair, a Chicago Surface Lines streetcar jumped its tracks and crashed into the statue's pedestal. The force of the crash dislodged the statue from the pedestal and the statue fell over falling off the base. The motorman, William Schultz, of the streetcar stated that the brakes failed as he was rounding the corner. He also later said that he was "sick of seeing that policeman with his arm raised." The city restored the statue in 1928 and moved the pedestal and statue into nearby Union Park.

  • Location #3 - Union Park (1928 thru June 2, 1957): The monument was located near Washington Boulevard on the North side of the street facing south and it remained in Union Park for nearly three decades. The finials, which flank the pedestal, had been modified after one of the monument's earlier moves. This change is believed to be the result of vandal damage or from being stripped at various times. During the 1950's, construction of the Kennedy Expressway erased about half of the old, run-down Haymarket Square Area, and on June 2, 1957, the statue was moved to Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway.

  • Location #4 - Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway (June 2, 1957 thru February 5, 1972): The Statue was situated on the north side of Randolph Street a block west of Desplaines Street at 700 West Randolph Street, just to the east of the new Kennedy Expressway. A new platform was built to support the pedestal and statue overlooking the expressway, only 200 feet from its original location. After years of vandalism the pedestal was badly stained and chipped as can be seen in the photo above.

    On May 4, 1968, The Haymarket statue was vandalized with black paint, the 82nd anniversary of the Haymarket affair, following a confrontation between police and demonstrators at a protest against the Vietnam War. The city named the monument a historic landmark in the mid-1960’s, but this did not prevent further vandalism, presumably in protest against police brutality in the context of opposition to the Vietnam War and social inequality in the United States. On October 6, 1969, in what was almost certainly a deliberate symbolic reenactment of the original Haymarket meeting, someone placed a powerful explosive between the legs of the statue, blowing out about a hundred windows nearby and sending chunks of the statue's legs onto the expressway below. Weather Underground members, known as Weatherman, took credit for the blast and battled police elsewhere in the streets of Chicago over several days. The statue was rebuilt and unveiled on May 4, 1970.

    The statue was repaired, but early on the morning of October 5, 1970, it was blown up again. The body of the statue badly bent a nearby railing as it fell before settling on the expressway embankment, and one of the legs landed two hundred feet away. Immediately after the blast, a person or persons called various news outlets to declare that the bombing was the work of the Weathermen. According to one newspaper, the caller said, "We just blew up Haymarket Square Statue for the second year in a row to show our allegiance to our brothers in the New York prisons and our black brothers everywhere. This is another phase of our revolution to overthrow our racist and fascist society. Power to the People." The two attacks on the police statue were among several politically-motivated bombings throughout the country at the time.

    An angry and determined Mayor Richard J. Daley had the statue repaired again and put under 24 police protection. On February 5, 1972, the statue was moved to the State Street Chicago Police Headquarters Building. The pedestal remained at this location for 24 more years and was finally removed in 1996. It is unknown whether the pedestal was scrapped or placed into storage by the city.

  • Location #5 - State Street Chicago Police Headquarters (February 5, 1972 thru October 5, 1976): On February 5, 1972, the statue was placed on a new marble pedestal located in the lobby of the State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building at 1121 South State Street. The statue remained on display in the headquarters lobby for four years and eight months. On October 5, 1976, the statue was then relocated to the new Chicago Police Training Academy. The State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building has since been razed and a new commercial and residential complex was built in its place.

  • Location #6 - Chicago Police Training Academy (October 5, 1976 thru June 1, 2007): On October 5, 1976, the statue was moved from the Old Chicago Police Headquarters Building and placed on a new granite pedestal, located in a secure outdoor courtyard at the Chicago Police Training Academy located at 1300 West Jackson Street for twenty years.

  • Location #7 - Michigan Avenue Chicago Police Headquarters (June 1, 2007 thru Present): On June 1, 2007 the statue was rededicated at Chicago Police Headquarters located at 3501 South State Street and placed on a new pedestal. The rededication unveiling was conducted by Geraldine Doceka, Officer Mathias Degan's great-granddaughter. The statue currently resides at this location.

Sergeant Patrick F. Delaney

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Mar 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
417
Incident Date:
04 Oct 1927
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
48
End of Watch:
04 Oct 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 16 - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
17 Mar 1879
Served:
20 years, 6 months, 25 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-11
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 21
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2-W: 19

Incident Details:

Sergeant Patrick F. Delaney, Star #417, aged 48 years, was a 20 year, 6 month, 25 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 16 - Maxwell.

On October 4, 1927, at 1:00 a.m., Sergeant Delaney observed three suspicious men, Shelby Brown, Arthur Lucus, 24, of 1308 West 14th Street and Willie Richardson, in front of a building located at 1337 Hastings Street. As Sergeant Delaney was questioning the other men, his focus the two, Lucas drew a revolver and fired. The men then fled on foot while Sergeant Delaney returned fire emptying his revolver at their backs. Sergeant Delaney then staggered to a nearby call box and contacted the operator at the Maxwell Street station. While reporting in, he collapsed before he could finish. A patrol wagon was immediately dispatched to his location and upon arrival found the Sergeant unconscious at the base of the call box. Sergeant Delaney was rushed to Cook County Hospital where he died a short time later at 4:30 a.m. the same day.

Shelby Brown was later arrested and during questioning, buckled under the pressure, and gave up Lucas’ location. According to Brown, Lucas was hiding out in a barn at the rear of his home. Police went to the location and apprehended him. In the end all of the offenders were eventually arrested including a fourth as an accomplice. On October 11, 1927, Brown, Lucus and Willie Richardson were held by the Coroner for murder and Miss Sidney Norment as an accessory. On March 12, 1928, Lucas entered a plea of guilty and was sentenced to 14 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Comerford. On April 12, 1928 the cases against Brown, Richardson and Sidney were stricken off the record.

Sergeant Delaney was laid to rest in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Sergeant Patrick F. Delaney, born March 17, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 9, 1907. On February 19, 1915, he was promoted to Detective Sergeant. On June 28, 1921, he was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Delaney was survived by his wife, two sons, and two daughters.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7952.

Patrolman John J. Dempsey

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
20 Jan 1890
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
1894-07-12
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Train
Age:
38
End of Watch:
14 Jul 1894
Unit of Assignment:
District 3, 7th Precinct - Deering
Date of Birth:
1856
Served:
4 years, 5 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 21
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 61-E: 28

Incident Details:

Patrolman John J. Dempsey, Star # Unknown, aged 38 years, was a 4 year, 5 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 3, 7th Precinct - Deering.

On July 12, 1894, Officer Dempsey was protecting the crossing at the intersection of 26th Street and Stewart Avenue when he was caught unaware by a train on the Eastern Illinois railroad tracks. He was struck by an incomming Grand Trunk Railroad train and was mortally wounded. He sustained crushing injuries to his chest and broken left arm and left leg which were also badly mangled. Officer Dempsey was transorted to Mercy Hospital by CPD Ambulance where he died two days later on July 14, 1894.

Officer Dempsey was waked at his residence located at No. 3050 Bonfield Street (present day 3050 South Bonfield Street) and he was laid to rest in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman John J. Dempsey, born in 1856, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 20, 1890.

Officer Dempsey was survived by his wife and three children.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On March 2, 2010, Officer Dempsey's star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Timothy Thomas Devine

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Nov 1888
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1814
Incident Date:
11 Aug 1902
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
48
End of Watch:
12 Aug 1902
Unit of Assignment:
District 10, 28th Precinct - Lake
Date of Birth:
May 1854
Served:
13 years, 9 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 31
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 44-E: 4

Incident Details:

Patrolman Timothy Thomas Devine, Star #1814, aged 48 years, was a 13 year, 9 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 10, 28th Precinct - Lake.

On August 11, 1902, at 3:30 a.m., Officer Devine and Patrolman Charles F. Pennell were ambushed by gunfire when they were following two burglary suspects who came out of alley on Jackson Boulevard between Paulina Street and Ashland Avenue and fired six shots. Both officers returned fire, each firing twice, one of them wounding one of the fleeing assailants. Officers Devine and Pennell were mortally wounded in the attack and were found by responding officers lying at the mouth of the alley. Officer Devine was found with his gun still in his hand, while Officer Pennell's gun was found approximately twenty feet away next to a fence in the alley. Officer Devine was found dead at the scene. Officer Pennell was taken to Cook County Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds the next day on August 12, 1902.

Before Officer Pennell's death, he was able to give a brief description of their assailants. He described two men, one six feet tall with a silk hat, the other approximately 5' 8“ tall. Trying to convey more details, Officer Pennell was unable to due to his injuries.

There were six arrests after the murders. John Pike was arrested on suspicion but later discharged on July 21, 1903. On November 30, 1909, Charles Kruger, under sentence of death for the murder of Constable Henry F. Bierer in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, on July 10, 1903, confessed to the murders of Officer Devine and Pennell. On February 11, 1904, Bierer was hanged in Pennsylvania. On August 12, 1905, Louis Stockowski was also arrested on information given by Louis Growzeski, who was at the time serving a sentence in Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.

Officer Devine was waked at his residence located at 741 West Ohio Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Malachy's Church and he was laid to rest on August 14, 1902 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. His grave is located in Lot 24, Block 39, Section S.

Patrolman Timothy Thomas Devine, born in May, 1854, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 7, 1888.

Officer Devine was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and Enterprise Lodge No. 103 of the Order of Columbian Knights. He was survived by his wife, Ellen and children: Bert, Catherine, Eleanor, John, Margaret, May, Myles, Thomas and Timothy.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #574.

Police Officer Marco DiFranco

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 May 1998
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
19312
Incident Date:
Cause of Death:
Illness - COVID-19
Age:
50
End of Watch:
01 Apr 2020
Unit of Assignment:
Office of Operations, Bureau of Detectives, Criminal Networks Group, Unit 189 - Narcotics Division
Date of Birth:
30 Apr 1969
Served:
21 years, 10 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Other - Not Listed
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Police Officer Marco DiFranco, Star #19312, aged 50 years, was a 21 year, 10 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Office of Operations, Bureau of Detectives, Criminal Networks Group, Unit 189 - Narcotics Division.

On March 26, 2020, Officer Di Franco was placed on the "Medical Roll" after contracting COVID-19 in the line of duty. He was eventually hospitalized at Lutheran General Hospital where he was admitted to the ICU and intubated. He would later succumb to the illness on April 1, 2020. On April 3, 2020, Mayor Lori Lightfoot and Interim Superintendent Charles Beck announced that Officer DiFranco’s death would be classified as in the line of duty.

Police Officer Marco DiFranco, born April 30, 1969, received his Probationary Appointment to the Department on May 26, 1998 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Superintendents1 Special Commendation Award, 3 Police Officer of the Month Awards, 18 Department Commendations, 2 Unit Meritorious Awards, 4 Joint Operations Awards, 3 Attendance Recognition Awards, 11 Deployment Operations Center Awards, The 2019 Crime Reduction Award, The 2009 Crime Reduction Award, The 2004 Crime Reduction Award, the NATO Summit Service Award, 1 Presidential Election Deployment Award, 1 Superintendent’s Honorable Mention, 103 Honorable Mentions, 10 Complimentary Letters and 1 Other Award during his career.

Officer DiFranco was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, two children: ages 7 and 10 and a brother (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #JD.

Patrolman Hubert J. Dillon

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
12 Dec 1917
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4957
Incident Date:
23 Nov 1930
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
23 Nov 1930
Unit of Assignment:
22nd District - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
02 Oct 1892
Served:
12 years, 11 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 28
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 24-E: 1

Incident Details:

Patrolman Hubert J. Dillon, Star #4957, aged 38 years, was a 12 year, 11 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 22nd District - Maxwell.

On November 23, 1930, at 2:45 p.m., Officer Dillon, a squad leader, and his squad, Patrolmen Patrick F. Gaynor and Robert Irwin, monitored a radio flash message and responded to a fight between two men in a gangway at 632 West O'Brien Street. Carter and another black man, Mayo McCulley of 632 West O'Brien Street, had been fighting and neighbors turned in an alarm. As Officer Dillon was exiting his squad car, he was shot by McKinley Carter of 639 West Maxwell Street. Officers Gaynor and Irwin immediately opened fire fatally wounding Carter. McCulley then moved forward in an attempt to attack the officers with a knife. McCulley was apprehended and placed into custody. Officers Gaynor and Irwin then commandeered a passing auto and transported Officer Dillon to Mother Cabrini Hospital on South Racine Street. Officer Dillon was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital.

McCulley, later told police that he had been arguing with Carter after they had been drinking. He acknowledged that neighbors called the police on them. He also stressed the fact that he was unaware that Carter was in possession of a gun. McCulley later committed suicide.

Officer Dillon was laid to rest on November 30, 1930 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Hubert J. Dillon, born October 2, 1892, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 12, 1917. He earned 6 Credible mentions during his career.

Officer Dillon was survived by his children, mother, two sisters and brother, Michael who had died in April 1930. Since the death of Dillon's brother, he had been caring for his two nephews and niece.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #9861.

Probationary Patrolman Daniel Joseph Doffyn

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 Jul 1994
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
14030
Incident Date:
08 Mar 1995
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
40
End of Watch:
08 Mar 1995
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Staff Services - Education and Training Division: Unit 044 - Recruit Training
Date of Birth:
30 Oct 1954
Served:
8 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
015 - Austin

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 12
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 7-W: 20

Incident Details:

Probationary Patrolman Daniel Joseph Doffyn, Star #14030, aged 40 years, was an 8 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department and was assigned to the Bureau of Staff Services - Education and Training Division: Unit 044 - Recruit Training, detailed to the 15th District - Austin.

On March 8, 1995, at 3:21 p.m., Officer Doffyn was on duty and assigned to work beat 1533 with his partner Patrolman Robert Podkowa. Just after roll call, Officer Doffyn and other officers were heading for their squad cars at the Austin District police station. They were about to begin their shift when they heard a radio report of a burglary in progress at a three story, 15-unit apartment building directly across the street from the police station.

Officer Daniel Doffyn and Probationary Patrolman Milan “Mike” Bubalo, beat 1513, responded. A neighbor had alerted police to three men entering a first floor apartment by smashing a window. Unbeknownst to the officers, the men, Murray Blue, age 24, Clyde Cowley, age 18 and Jimmy Parker, age 33, were seeking a "safe-house" to hide in. Approximately 20 minutes before, the three suspects shot and injured a rival gang member on the 4300 block of West Maypole Avenue. Blue, shot Young as Parker and Cowley sat in the car with him. They fled to an apartment located at 750 North Lorel Avenue; one of the suspect's girlfriends. She was not home at the time and they broke in. Fearing that police were chasing them for the earlier shooting, one of the suspects reportedly ordered his cohorts to go "at it till the end," and they obliged.

When the officers arrived to the scene they saw the broken glass outside and entered the building. As they knocked on the unit's door, they could hear glass breaking and footsteps from inside as the trio attempted to escape through the apartment's rear. The three men inside assumed the officers were there to arrest them in connection to the shooting. Officers Doffyn and Bubalo ran outside to catch fleeing suspects. Then, officer Doffyn caught Clyde Cowley and held him in a "bear hug" as the suspect struggled with him. Simultaneously, in the rear of the building, a responding officer walked into Parker and Blue. Parker was unarmed and raised his hands in the air. Blue was yielding a TEC-9 sub-machine gun and ran from the officer in the direction of Officers Doffyn and Bubalo. Upon seeing the two officers, Blue unleashed multiple shots, striking both officers. Officer Bubalo was shot in the hip and Officer Doffyn was shot in the right side of his head and right side of his chest at the clavicle. The wounded Officer Bubalo was able to return gunfire and shot Blue. Officer Buballo and Blue made a full recovery. Officer Doffyn was transported to at Cook County Hospital by CFD #52 and pronounced dead by Dr. Bredeman at 8:25 p.m. on March 8, 1995.

Blue, Cowley, and Parker were found guilty of Officer Doffyn's murder and the attempted murder of Officer Bubalo. Blue was sentenced to death, but that conviction was overturned by then Governor George H. Ryan who issued a moratorium on the death penalty and emptied the state's death row by commuting the sentences of 167 inmates to life in prison. Blue is currently serving his term without the possibility of parole. Clyde Cowley will be eligible for parole on March 8, 2015. Jimmy Parker will be eligible for parole on January 20, 2028.

On October 17, 2003, the Illinois Supreme Court ordered new trials for two men convicted of killing Officer Doffyn, because the prosecution displayed the bloodstained uniform of Officer Daniel Doffyn. The court applied a similar reasoning in their decision that threw out the convictions of two who were sentenced to life in prison for their roles in Doffyn's shooting.

Officer Doffyn was waked at Drake & Son Funeral Home located at 5303 North Western Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church located at 3301 West Byron Street and he was laid to rest on March 11, 1995 in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Probationary Patrolman Daniel Joseph Doffyn, born October 30, 1954, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 5, 1994 and was in Recruit Class 94-4C at the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Superintendent's Award of Valor (posthumously) and 1 Police Blue Star Award (posthumously) during his career.

Officer Doffyn was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his ex-wife, Caryn Sue (nee Price), age 39; daughter, Brittany Devannue, age 8 and parents: Lea (nee Farasyn) and Roger. His daughter would later become a Chicago Police Officer.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #Z101225.

On April 19, 1996, Officer Doffyn's star was retired by Superintendent Matt L. Rodriguez and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Doffyn's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

On February 24, 1998, in memory of Officer Doffyn, Bill H.R. 2773, was proposed in the United States House of Representatives to designate the facility of the United States Postal service located at 3750 North Kedzie Avenue, as the "Daniel J. Doffyn Post Office Building." Two-thirds of the member in the house voted in the affirmative to suspend the rules and the bill was passed. It was ordered, that the Clerk request the concurrence of the Senate in said bill. The senate brought the bill to a vote and the bill was approved.

Patrolman Patrick H. Doherty

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
11 May 1917
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1978
Incident Date:
10 Aug 1922
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
10 Aug 1922
Unit of Assignment:
District 2 - Cottage Grove
Date of Birth:
15 Sep 1888
Served:
5 years, 2 months, 30 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 3
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 7
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 11-W: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Patrick H. Doherty, Star #1978, aged 33 years, was a 5 year, 2 month, 30 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2 - Cottage Grove.

On August 10, 1922, at 9:15 p.m., Officer Doherty was off duty and in plain clothes. He observed two men, David Thompson and Louis Roberts of 2928 South State Street, leaving a restaurant at 28th and State Streets. Officer Doherty was well known for patrolling his beat, even when off duty, in an area he had coined the “Bad Lands.” He had suspected the men of being holdups in an earlier armed robbery. As Officer Doherty approached to investigate he called out to the men from across the street. The men responded by opening fire and a gun battle ensued. Officer Doherty returned fire, shooting two times as they continued to shoot at him. He was struck three times and mortally wounded, dying shortly thereafter.

Witness accounts helped reconstruct the events as they occurred however not all accounts were trustworthy. The accounts were varied and vague due to fear of retaliation from neighborhood vice bosses. The course of events listed above is from the statements from the trustworthiest witnesses. It was never determined if the gun battle took place from across the entire street. It was believed the witnesses stated such in an attempt to protect themselves from identifying the shooters. David Thompson and Louis Roberts were held for questioning and eventually confessed. They claimed Officer Roberts approached the men with his revolver in hand and asked what they had on them as he began to feel their pockets. One of the men responded by grabbing Officer Doherty’s revolver and opening fire. The man fired three times as they both fled. The gun used to murder Officer Doherty was recovered under a sidewalk at 2724 South State Street.

Officer Doherty’s murder sparked racial tensions when over 100 officers were sent into the largely black neighborhood surrounding 31st and State Streets in order to conduct a manhunt for the shooters. Further violence was stemmed, as officers, mostly from the Chicago Police Reserves, were able to keep the crowds under control and restore order within an hour. Doherty’s murder was mostly a mystery as several theories developed. The most popular theory was that his murder was a planned hit. It was an open secret in the area he patrolled that the vice bosses openly talked about killing him to end his interference with their illegal vice activities. However, that theory along with the others were never substantiated.

Officer Doherty was laid to rest on August 14, 1922 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

On August 12, 1922, David Thompson and Louie Roberts were arrested and held by the Coroner. On November 28, 1922, both were acquitted by Judge Caverly.

Patrolman Patrick H. Doherty, born September 15, 1888, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 11, 1917. He earned 6 Credible Mentions during his career.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7458.

Sergeant Gerald E. Doll

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Aug 1955
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
477
Incident Date:
29 Mar 1967
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
36
End of Watch:
29 Mar 1967
Unit of Assignment:
15th District - Austin
Date of Birth:
21 Nov 1930
Served:
11 years, 7 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
015 - Austin

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-W: 11

Incident Details:

Sergeant Gerald E. Doll, Star #477, aged 36 years, was an 11 year, 7 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 15th District - Austin.

On March 29, 1967, at 9:34 p.m., Sergeant Doll was working alone on beat 1580. While on patrol he observed a 1963 Chevy station wagon, later discovered to be stolen, traveling at a high rate of speed northbound on Cicero Avenue. As he attempted to stop the vehicle, the driver, Gary Horton, age 25, of 114 West Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, Illinois, fled. At the same time Patrolman William G. Redden, beat 1503, was traveling southbound on the 2100 block of North Cicero Avenue when he observed a police vehicle chasing the black Chevy station wagon. Officer Redden made a U-Turn and joined the pursuit. Moments later, the speeding vehicle attempted to turn eastbound onto Shakespeare Avenue. Horton lost control of the vehicle and it jumped the curb onto and crashed. Horton jumped out and ran around the front of the vehicle. At this time Sergeant Doll exited his car and ordered Horton to stop. Horton, hearing the Sergeant's voice, swung around and produced a sawed off shotgun from under his coat and fired twice. Sergeant Doll was struck by the shotgun blast and returned fire, shooting six times emptying his revolver before collapsing. Horton then fled on foot eastbound on Shakespeare with his passenger, Delia Ann Jones, age 25, of 3303 North Cicero Avenue.

Officer Redden pulled up just as the sergeant fell and gave chase. As they ran, Officer Redden fired three rounds at Horton. He chased them into the south alley of West Palmer Street. As Officer Redden turned into the “T“ alley he could see Jones about to turn and run eastbound in the north alley of Shakespeare. He fired three more rounds at the girl striking her in the back, thigh and leg causing her to collapse to the ground. Officer Redden then ran back to assist the fallen officer and discovered it was Sergeant Doll. He called in a 10-1, police officer shot and an ambulance. After radioing in Officer Redden ran back to the alley and discovered the girl was now gone. He looked down the “T“ alley and saw no one but took notice of a garage door cracked open at 4733 West Palmer Street. He then ran back to Sergeant Doll and to direct the responding officers. Once the scene was secure, Officer Redden and other officers went back to the alley and the garage door that was cracked open was now closed. The officer entered and conducted a search of the garage. Officer Redden found Jones hiding inside and placed her in handcuffs. Jones was then transported to Belmont Hospital for treatment.

Horton was wounded by Sergeant Doll but managed to make good his escape, but only temporarily. He was later found during a search of the area in a yard located at 2218 North Keating dead from the wounds he received in the shootout. Sergeant Doll was transported to St. Ann's Hospital by beat 1470 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Farrell at 10:22 p.m. on March 29, 1967.

On April 19, 1967, the Grand Jury returned a true bill on Delia Jones for murder, armed robbery, and auto theft. On December 19, 1967, Jones pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter and was sentenced to 8 to 20 years in prison by Judge Francis T. Delaney. Jones also pleaded guilty to a charge of robbery and auto theft and she was sentenced to 8 to 20 years for the two charges, one which brought 10 years. The sentences ran concurrently with the first sentence. Jones became eligible for parole after seven years.

Sergeant Doll was waked at Ahern Funeral Home located at 1110 West Madison Street, his funeral mass was held in Requiem at St. Lucy Church located at 3018 South Wells Street and he was laid to rest on April 1, 1967 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Sergeant Gerald E. Doll, born November 21, 1930, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 22, 1955. He earned 1 Honorable Mentions during his career. On March 23, 1965, he was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Doll served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of the Korean War and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of Amvets Post No. 97, the Illinois Police Association, and the St. Jude Police League. Sergeant Doll was survived by his expectant wife, Mary Agnes (nee Flynn); children: Donald, Edward J. and Gerald J.; step-children: Marianne and Margaret; parents: Leslie F. and Josephine Newberg and siblings: Frank L. and Michael A. Following Sergeant Doll's death his wife gave birth to a baby boy, Donald K. Doll, on June 21, 1967.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #F092385.

Patrolman Bernard “Bernie” W. Domagala

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 May 1981
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
8996
Incident Date:
14 Jul 1988
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
66
End of Watch:
05 Sep 2017
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 710 – Gang Crimes Unit South
Date of Birth:
06 Feb 1951
Served:
7 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Casimir Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 25
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 44-E: 30

Incident Details:

Patrolman Bernard W. Domagala, Star #8996, aged 66 years, was a 32 year, 8 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 710 – Gang Crimes Unit South and was a member of the Hostage, Barricade and Terrorist (HBT) Unit.

On July 14, 1988, at approximately 11:00 a.m., the Cook County Sheriff’s Office was in the process of serving an eviction notice. The respondent was a former Chicago Police Officer named Tommie Lee Hudson, age 46, at 7237 South Stony Island Avenue. The Sheriff’s Officers and the movers made a forced entry into the residence with a sledgehammer. Upon entry Hudson fired three shots at them with a shotgun from behind an archway in his living room, and one of the movers, Edgar Luna, age 27, was hit in the upper arm. The Officer’s immediately called for backup. Luna, the other movers and the deputies hid beneath the front porch until Chicago Police arrived.

Officer Domagala was on duty shortly before his shift was over. As a member of the HBT Team, he responded to the hostage / barricade situation. Responding officers surrounded the property. Officer Domagala was assigned to the rear containment behind a garage located east of the home, where he took up a defensive position. With the house surrounded, officers tried to communicate with Hudson with bullhorns because he had no phone. Hudson rarely responded to officers. Shortly before 5:00 p.m., Officer Domagala peeked around the corner of the garage looking towards the house approximately 100 feet away. As his head peeked around the corner a round shot round struck him in the head. Hudson had fired his replica of a Civil War cap-and-ball revolver from a rear kitchen window just as Officer Domagala peeked around the corner. The ball struck Officer Domagala in the forehead, passed through the right side of his brain, then came to rest near his right ear. He was transported to Michael Reese Hospital where he underwent six hours of surgery to remove the ball from his brain. In a statement made by Commander Richard Dwyer, of the 21st District - Prairie, Domagala was able to talk to paramedics on the way to the hospital and did not pass out until he was medicated. Edgar Luna was taken to Jackson Park Hospital and Medical Center was treated and released.

Following the shooting of Officer Domagala the HBT Team fired at least 50 tear gas canisters into the home and finally persuaded Hudson to come out. At 6:55 p.m., Hudson surrendered, came out waving a white flag, and was taken into custody without further incident. Several registered firearms, a cap-and-ball revolver, shotgun, two-shot .22 Magnum Derringer pistol and an air rifle were recovered from Hudson’s home. In addition a hunting bow and three homemade black powder bombs were also recovered.

Hudson was arrested and charged with attempted murder of a police officer. On December 10, 1990, minutes before a jury was to be picked for his trial, Hudson was declared incompetent to stand trial. Cook County Criminal Court Judge James Bailey ordered Hudson committed to the Illinois Department of Mental Health for up to a year for evaluation and treatment. Hudson was later released from the state hospital and eventually relocated to Memphis, TN and then to Houston, TX where he was killed on February 10, 1994. He is buried in West Tennessee State Veterans Cemetery located at 4000 Forest Hill-Irene Road, Memphis, Tennessee.

Hudson was a police officer from 1966 until February 15, 1971, when he resigned after a medical disability leave. Relatives of Hudson at the time said he had suffered from mental problems for years but they couldn`t get him help from authorities and gave up in frustration. He was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force during Vietnam but was never deployed and according to family. According to the Veterans Administration, Hudson bought his home, a two-story brick row house, with a VA insured mortgage but stopped paying in August, 1984. “The VA tried to help him keep his home, but it just became impossible to do,” said Art Selikoff, a spokesman for the VA. According to the Cook County Sheriff`s Office, the VA foreclosed on the home in 1985, and sheriff’s deputies evicted Hudson on October 15, 1986. In April, 1987, however, the VA complained in court that Hudson had moved back into the home.

Officer Domagala was 37 years old at the time of the incident, would enter the Disability Pension Roll (DPR) on October 12, 1989 and later resign from the Department on February 6, 2014. He survived the round shot but would suffer from years of traumatic brain injury complications, surgeries and therapies. Every day of his life continued to be a new challenge. For the past several years of his life Officer Domagala had been living in a traumatic brain injury rehabilitation center in Southern Illinois. Officer Domagala passed away on September 5, 2017 at Kindred Lakeshore Hospital in Edgewater, from complications resulting from his line of duty injury. On September 7, 2017, the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office ruled his death a homicide.

Officer Domagala was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, Oak Lawn, Illinois, his funeral mass was held at Queen of Martyrs Church located at 10233 South Central Park, Evergreen Park, Illinois and he was laid to rest on September 11, 2017 in St. Casimir Cemetery, 4401 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Section 34, Lot 438, Grave 2.

Patrolman Bernard W. Domagala, born on February 6, 1951, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 18, 1981 and was in Recruit Class 81-3B at the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Blue Star Award, 1 Department Commendation, 1 Unit Meritorious Performance Award, 13 Honorable Mentions and 5 Complimentary Letters during his career. Officer Domagala was also an honoree for the Carter Harrison Medal in 1989.

Patrolman Domagala was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Denise K. and children: Adam, Craig and Erik.

One of the Sheriff’s Deputies that fateful day was John C. Knight. Knight would later join the Chicago Police Department on December 26, 1989. On January 9, 1999, Officer Knight was shot and killed in the line of duty while conducting a traffic stop.

On July 17, 2018, Officer Domagala's star was retired by Superintendent of Police Eddie T. Johnson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Morgan Patrick Donahue

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Apr 1909
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
25 Aug 1919
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
25 Aug 1919
Unit of Assignment:
District 15, 20th Precinct - Fillmore
Date of Birth:
06 May 1890
Served:
10 years, 4 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
007 - Englewood

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Inclusion Request Declined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Morgan Patrick Donahue, Star # Unknown, aged 29 years, was a 10 year, 4 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 15, 20th Precinct - Fillmore.

On August 25, 1919, at 9:30 p.m., Officer Donahue, while off duty, was at the Hoffman & Egan Saloon located at 5858 South Halsted Street. He was there with 15 of his brother officers. Events of the incident were never clear and three theories as to what started the chain of events surfaced. The first theory was that Officer Donahue attempted to take a bottle of beer from the saloon. The second theory was that patrons of the saloon believed the officers to be inspectors for the dry law. The third theory, presented in a statement given by Daniel McFall of 5339 South Loomis Street, a 13th Ward politician who had run for alderman several times as a Democrat after the shooting. He stated that the fight started over a box of candy taken from the pocket of a relative, James McFall, a city fireman. One of the men took the candy and a fight ensued. The men took sides and part of the gang which tried to steal the candy left the saloon and soon returned armed.

What is known is that Officer Donahue began to struggle with Anthony Kelly of 4208 South Union Avenue. Kelly was a foreman at the Wilson & Company meatpacking plant in the stockyards. Kelly was struggling with Officer Donahue in an attempt to gain control of a bottle of beer Donahue was holding. It was at this time Edward Hoffman fired a shot into the floor in an attempt to break up the fight. Officer Donahue’s partner, Patrolman John P. Donegan heard the gunshot and believed Kelly had a gun and had just shot his partner. However, Officer Donahue was shot, but the assailant was unknown. It was believed at the time that Edward Hoffman had shot Officer Donahue, but evidence disproving this theory later turned up. Donegan drew his revolver and shot Kelly. Kelly was struck in his chest and right leg. Three men took Officer Donahue to Englewood Union Hospital in a black auto with no lights or tags. Upon arrival at the hospital Officer Donahue was left outside the front door as the men who brought him left. Officer Donahue succumbed to his injuries before he entered the hospital. Kelly was also taken to Englewood Union Hospital where he later died from his wounds.

It was Detective Sergeant William “Packy” Doyle who gave a full and coherent statement of what transpired. Doyle and Powers attempted to break up the fight but were unable to gain control of the situation. At this point they both left the saloon and each went to a patrol box and called for backup after Donahue was shot. The Englewood and Stockyards Stations both received the calls for back up and each sent officers. Inside one of the stations an officer yelled out, “Cop named Donneggan killed.” One officer heard the commotion, Probationary Patrolman Joseph Morgan, age 25, and asked, “What name did you say? I’ve got a brother over in that neighborhood.” Officer Joseph Morgan jumped in a patrol wagon and headed to the hospital. Upon arrival at the hospital, he was met by the doctor who said, “You can’t see them. The policeman’s dead. The other man is dying.” Officer Joseph Morgan then asked what the star number of the officer killed was and was told. It was his brother’s and he became faint and collapsed being caught by his fellow officers. He perked up and reached for his revolver saying, “Morgan’s dead, I might as well go too.” Before he could put the gun to his head, the other officers took it from him.

General Superintendent John J. Garrity took immediate action in the wake of the shooting. Four officers; Detective Sergeant Edward Powers of the East Chicago Avenue Station, Detective Sergeant Frank Welling of the Detective Bureau, Detective Sergeant William Egan of the Maxwell Street Station and Patrolman John P. Donegan of the Fillmore Street Station were suspended for their possible involvement in the incident. Donegan and Powers admitted to being at the saloon and Donegan also admitted to firing his gun. Egan claimed that he had not been in the saloon at all. Welling admitted to being there but claimed to have left the saloon when the fight broke out and returned after it was over. No further action was taken against the officers and they eventually returned to full duty.

After the shooting Officer Donegan, Martin Egan, Edward Hoffman, James McFall and the bartender were held for questioning. During questioning Hoffman admitted to firing the first shot but claimed to have shot the ground in an attempt to end the dispute. He denied shooting Officer Donahue. However, investigators did not believe him, as the bullet recovered from Officer Donahue was from a .45 caliber gun the same as the gun Hoffman fired. A spent .45 caliber round was later found on the floor of the saloon corroborating Hoffman’s account.

On September 29, 1919, Edward Hoffman was arrested and held without bail. He was held by the Coroner to the Grand Jury on a charge of Manslaughter: Unintentional killing with Gun. The March 1920 Grand Jury returned a No Bill on Hoffman. No one was ever found responsible for the murder of Officer Donahue.

Officer Donahue was laid to rest on August 28, 1919 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Morgan Patrick Donahue, born May 6, 1890, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 16, 1909.

Officer Donahue served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of World War I and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his mother, Ellen (nee Sullivan) and siblings: Joseph, age 25 (CPD), Roger, age 17 and Walter, age 19.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3465.

Park Policeman John L. Donner

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
1909
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
125
Incident Date:
07 May 1917
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle (Pursuit)
Age:
41
End of Watch:
07 May 1917
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
18 May 1876
Served:
8 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Lucas Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 50
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 37-E: 10

Incident Details:

Patrolman John L. Donner, Star #125, aged 41 years, was an 8 year veteran of the Lincoln Park Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On May 7, 1917, in the late evening, Officer Donner was attempting to pull over a speeding motorist on Southbound Sheridan Road when he collided with another vehicle at Sunnyside Avenue. As he was pursuing the speeder, a Southbound bus blocked his path. In an attempt to overtake the bus, Officer Donner moved into the northbound lane. At the time Officer Donner was traveling at approximately 60 mph and had no time to break or swerve to avoid colliding with the vehicle. He crashed head on with the vehicle and was thrown from the motorcycle slamming into the car. Upon impact he fractured his skull and was killed instantly. The vehicle, which was driven by George E. Orr of 4046 West Racine Avenue, a general manager for the National Security Company located at 10 South LaSalle Street, was hidden from Officer Donner’s view by the bus. In the car with Mr. Orr was James J. Hirsch.

Officer Donner was waked at his residence located at 2661 North Marshfield Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 10, 1917 in St. Lucas Cemetery, 5300 North Pulaski Road, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman John L. Donner, born on May 18, 1875, received his Probationary Appointment to the Lincoln Park Police Department in 1909.

Officer Donner was survived by his wife, Mary (nee Wielbinski); son, Henry S.; father, William O. and siblings: Frank, Louis, Hattie Tuscany, Jennie and Mrs. Ida Reichrath.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The Lincoln Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park district police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the Lincoln Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

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