LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

  • The results are being filtered by the character: F
1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman William Peter Fahey Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Oct 1972
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4194
Incident Date:
09 Feb 1982
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
10 Feb 1982
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Field Services - Tactical Services: Unit 710 - Gang Crimes Enforcement South
Date of Birth:
18 Oct 1947
Served:
9 years, 3 months, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
006 - Gresham

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 36
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 29-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Peter Fahey, Jr., Star #4194, aged 34 years, was a 9 year, 3 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Field Services - Tactical Services: Unit 710 - Gang Crimes Enforcement South.

On February 9, 1982, at 2:03 p.m., Patrolmen William Peter Fahey, Jr. and Richard J. O'Brien were on duty working beat 6162. They pulled over a brown 1978 Chevy Impala at 8110 South Morgan Street for failing to obey a stop sign. The driver of the vehicle was Jackie F. Wilson, age 21 of 11409 South May Street and seated next to him was his brother, Andrew Wilson age 29 of 11409 South May Street. It is alleged that at the time of the traffic stop, the brothers were on their way to free convicted cop murderer, Edgar Hope. According to eyewitness testimony, Jackie Wilson exited the vehicle before the officers approached. He began to argue with Officer O’Brien and refused to produce his driver’s license. Officer Fahey after noticing a suspicious object on Andrew Wilson ordered him to exit the vehicle. Once outside Officer Fahey attempted to place Andrew Wilson in custody and struggle ensued. During the struggle Officer Fahey was disarmed by Andrew Wilson who then proceeded to shoot Officer Fahey once. The bullet entered Officer Fahey’s head behind the left ear, fragmenting upon entry causing severe brain damage. Andrew Wilson then turned on Officer O’Brien shooting him three times in the chest. Jackie Wilson then noticed Officer O'Brien was still moving and shouted to his brother, "still up and about." Andrew Wilson then jumped onto their vehicle's trunk lid and shot Officer O'Brien two more times, once in arm and once in the hip.

Following the shooting, the brothers jumped back into their car and drove off. For some unknown reason the murderers made a U-turn and returned to the scene of the crime where they proceeded to grab both officers’ firearms and then fled southbound on Morgan Street making good their escape. Help was first summoned to the scene when a voice was heard over the police radio, "Emergency! Emergency! Two policemen have been shot at 81st and Morgan." It was later learned to be the voice of a witness to the shooting who ran to the squad car and grabbed the microphone when he saw the officers fall. The eyewitness testified, "The police officer [Fahey] had subdued him enough to the point where he could put the handcuffs on, and then the man [Andrew] reached around behind the officer and came up with a shiny pistol.”

Officer Fahey was transported to Little Company of Mary Hospital in Evergreen Park by beat 672 where he fell into a coma and was pronounced dead at 11:14 a.m. on February 10, 1982. Officer O'Brien was also transported to Little Company of Mary Hospital in Evergreen Park by beat 672 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Birfe at 2:20 p.m. on February 9, 1982.

On February 13, 1982, the getaway car was recovered at 114th Street and May Avenue. Not far away from the Wilson’s residence. Officer moved in and the Wilson brothers were apprehended and arrested. The officers service revolvers were also recovered from their residence.

In 1983, Andrew Wilson was sentenced to death and Jackie Wilson was sentenced to life in prison without parole. They were later granted retrials on the grounds that they should have been initially tried separately. During the retrial, Jackie Wilson was convicted of first degree murder in Officer O'Brien's death, but was acquitted of his part in Officer Fahey's murder. Andrew Wilson was convicted of two counts of murder and two counts of armed robbery in the deaths of the officers. On January 10, 2003, Governor George Ryan commuted Andrew Wilson’s sentence, along with 167 other inmates on death row, to life in prison. In 2007, Andrew Wilson died in prison.

Tragically Patrolmen William P. Fahey and Richard James O'Brien were shot and killed as they returned from Patrolman James Edward Doyle's funeral who had been killed four days earlier. Patrolmen Richard James O'Brien and William Fahey were not regular partners. O'Brien's regular partner was off sick and Fahey's was filling in on a desk job for a furloughed policeman.

Officer Fahey was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 3737 West 79th Street, his funeral mass was held at Queen of the Universe Church located at 7114 South Hamlin Avenue and he was laid to rest on February 13, 1982 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman William Peter Fahey, Jr., born October 18, 1947, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 23, 1972. He earned 19 Honorable Mentions and numerous Complimentary Letters during his career.

Officer Fahey served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of the Korean and Vietnam Wars and was Honorably Discharged. He was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Fahey was survived by his wife, Patricia P. (nee Walker); children: Erin Marie, age 4, Jamie Marie, age 1 and Krista Marie Feck, age12 and parents.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #D044364.

On October 20, 1982, Officer Fahey's star was retired by Superintendent Richard Brzeczek and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Fahey's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman James Clarence Farley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 Jul 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5269
Incident Date:
23 Jun 1927
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
23 Jun 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 33 - Summerdale
Date of Birth:
22 Jun 1897
Served:
4 years, 11 months, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
020 - Lincoln

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Memorial Park Cemetery - Skokie, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-11
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 20
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 37-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman James Clarence Farley, Star #5269, aged 33 years, was a 4 year, 11 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 33 - Summerdale.

On June 23, 1927, at approximately 12:00 a.m., a citizen, E. S. Cooper and his wife, came into the Summerdale station to report their automobile stolen. According to Cooper he had been driving on Berwyn Avenue between Lincoln and Western Avenues when another man, Jack Leathers of Normal, Illinois, brandishing a gun and driving a large vehicle forced his vehicle to the curb. Leathers then exited his car and jumped onto the running board of Cooper’s car and pointed his gun at him. Leathers then ordered Cooper to drive east. After driving a short distance, Leathers ordered Cooper to pull over and robbed him of $5.00 and then threw him out of the car.

While Mr. Cooper was in the process of telling his story to police, Patrolman James Farley and Sergeant Thomas Kehoe monitored a call which came into the station of a suspicious man with a flashlight trying to break into and apartment located at 2451 West Gunnison Street. Sergeant Kehoe and Officer Farley responded to the scene. While en route, at 1:35 a.m., the officers spotted a vehicle matching the description of Mr. Cooper’s automobile parked in front of 4936 North Rockwell Avenue with a man and women seated inside. The officers confirmed the auto to be Cooper’s and moved in to investigate. While attempting to place the male occupant, Jack Leathers, in custody he produced a revolver firing at the officers. The officers returned fire and a firefight ensued with all three men being hit and eventually succumbing to their wounds. While the gunfire was being exchanged, the female occupant of the car fled the scene.

Police investigating the shooting were able to identify Leathers by running his fingerprints. He had served time at the Pontiac Reformatory at the age of 19. Police also discovered that the car used to force Mr. Cooper to the curb was also stolen from Emil Svedian on June 22, 1927 at 10:30 p.m.

Officer Farley was waked at a funeral home located at 6959 North Clark Street was laid to rest on June 25, 1927 in Memorial Park Cemetery, 9900 Gross Point Road, Skokie, Illinois.

Patrolman James Clarence Farley, born June 22, 1897, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 5, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $180.00 during his career.

Officer Farley served in the Armed Forces, was a veteran of World War I and the Spanish American War and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Olga (nee Gassick), father, John J. and siblings: John Edward and the late Katharine.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8026.

Patrolman William Feeley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
21 Oct 1889
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
31 Jul 1894
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Train
Age:
23
End of Watch:
31 Jul 1894
Unit of Assignment:
District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards
Date of Birth:
1871
Served:
4 years, 9 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 5
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 47-W: 30

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Feeley, Star # Unknown, aged 23 years, was a 4 year, 9 month, 10 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards.

On July 31, 1894, Officer Feeley was on duty and assigned to patrol the train tracks between Ashland Avenue and the Panhandle crossing. He and another officer had been detailed to patrol the tracks due to the ongoing Stockyard Riots. Officer Feeley was riding on a Chicago and Grand Trunk Railroad engine. As it approached the corner of 49th Street and Robey Street (present day Damen Avenue) Officer Feeley fell from the engine into the path of another oncoming train. With no time to move out of the way, Officer Feeley was struck and killed instantly.

Officer Feeley was waked at his residence located at No. 1533 West 47th Street (present day 1435 West 47th Street), his funeral mass was held at Visitation Catholic Church located at 941 West Garfield Boulevard (present day 843 West Garfield Boulevard) and he was laid to rest on August 2, 1894 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman William Feeley, born in 1871, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 21, 1889.

Officer Feeley was survived by his wife.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On July 17, 2018, Officer Feeley's star was retired by Superintendent of Police Eddie T. Johnson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Probationary Patrolman Patrick Fenton

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 May 1888
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1169
Incident Date:
27 Feb 1898
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
36
End of Watch:
27 Feb 1898
Unit of Assignment:
District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards
Date of Birth:
1862
Served:
9 years, 9 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 28
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-W: 16

Incident Details:

Probationary Patrolman Patrick Fenton, Star #1169, aged 36 years, was a 9 year, 9 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards.

On February 27, 1898, at 10:00 p.m., Officer Fenton and his partner, Patrolman Daniel Carey, responded to a disturbance at No. 413 West 42nd Street (present day 313 West 42nd Street). The residence was a boarding house operated by Mrs. Ellen M. Cleary.

The day prior Mrs. Cleary informed Michael Clark, a boarder, that she would be needing his room and that she would like him to pack his belongings and leave the following day. Michael Clark was a sheep butcher employed at the Stock Yards and had recently lost his job. Ever since then he had become disagreeable and Mrs. Cleary no longer wanted him to stay there. He seemed to have no objections, but when Mrs. Cleary went to remind him the next day he appeared to be having a mental episode. Mrs. Cleary left his room without pressing the issue out of fear for her safety. It wasn’t until Clark’s brother, Frank arrived to visit that she informed him of his brother’s strange behavior and that he needed to vacate the room. Frank went to see his brother who refused to open the door. Frank then went to get their oldest brother, Thomas, who had more influence with Michael. They returned and again attempted to talk to Michael. Michael opened the door and threatened to shoot his brothers if they didn’t leave. Thomas and Frank then went downstairs and discussed the situation with Mrs. Cleary. Mrs. Cleary stated that she was afraid to have Michael in the house. The two brothers promised to remedy the situation quickly and said they would bring back police to escort their brother to the asylum.

Officers Carey and Fenton arrived and proceeded to Clark’s room located on the second floor. Officer Fenton headed up the stairs first with Officer Carey second and Mrs. Cleary taking up the rear. Officer Fenton banged on the door and demanded admittance. The officers received no response from Clark. The officer continued to bang on the door with negative results. It was at this time that Officer Fenton attempted to kick the door in. He stepped back and put his full weight against the door with no success. Clark had sufficiently barricaded the door to prevent entry. Officer Fenton then attempted one more time. This time the lock broke and the chair that had been used to barricade the door flew across the room into the corner. The momentum of Officer Fenton’s force sent him into the room headfirst. As Officer Fenton attempted to regain his balance, Clark fired a shot and he collapsed to the floor yelling, “Come in Dan, I’m shot!.”

Mrs. Cleary ran down the stairs screaming for help. Frank and Thomas Clark then aided Mrs. Cleary in summoning help. Meanwhile, Officer Carey entered the darkened room with his club drawn and attacked Clark. As Officer Carey raised the club to strike Clark, Clark leveled his revolver and fired again, striking Carey in the side. Officer Carey quickly regained his footing and grabbed for the gun as Clark attempted to fire again. The two men struggled to gain control. With the guns muzzle to Officer Carey chest, Clark pulled the trigger again. The gun however, didn’t go off as Officer Carey’s thumb had blocked the hammer from firing the round. Officer Carey then threw Clark onto the bed and wrenched his hand sufficient enough to send the gun into the corner of the room. Becoming weak from his gunshot wound, Officer Carey became too exhausted to maintain control over Clark and he broke free. Clark then ran to the window jumping through it without opening the sash. He fell to the ground in a pile of snow, his hands and feet being severely cut by the glass. Clark then ran to St. Cecilia’s Church where he banged on the door. Father Kelly opened the door and admitted him into the parish house where Dr. Cleary treated him. Just as soon as the doctor bandaged up Clark, Patrolman Keating arrived and took Clark into custody.

Officer Fenton died on scene from his wound and was taken to Thomas McInerny & Son undertaking establishment located at No. 5050 State Street (present day 5050 South State Street). Officer Carney was taken to a drug store located at Root Street and Wentworth Avenue. His wound was dressed and he was then taken to his residence for recovery which was believed to

Clark was taken to the station and refused to cooperate. He answered all of his questions with bloodcurdling screams and stated he fled to the church to the church to seek forgiveness for what he had done. He also said, “I am not a bad man. I just resented an attempt to encroach upon my room.” Michael Clark stood trial and was declared insane. On June 30, 1898, he was committed for life in the Chester State Hospital Asylum for Insane Criminals by Judge Waterman. On February 14, 1900, Clark hanged himself inside the asylum.

Officer Fenton was waked at his residence located at No. 1408 51st Street (present day 1306 East 51st Street) and he was laid to rest on March 2, 1898 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Patrick Fenton, born in 1862, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 18, 1888.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #723.

Patrolman Joseph Francis Ferguson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Jun 1965
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6892
Incident Date:
27 Dec 1968
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
25
End of Watch:
27 Dec 1968
Unit of Assignment:
2nd District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
17 May 1943
Served:
3 years, 6 months, 13 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 26-E: 2

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph Francis Ferguson, Star #6892, aged 25 years, was a 3 year, 6 month, 13 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 2nd District - Wabash.

On December 27, 1968, at 3:50 p.m., Officer Ferguson and his partner, Patrolman Daniel Cambric were working beat 202. While on patrol they stopped three men, Ralph Bellamy, age 33, Calvin Hayden, age 39 and Allen Sanders, age 40, at 3834 South Indiana Avenue to question them. The officers recognized one man as a parolee and another as a narcotics user. They searched all three and released Bellamy and continued to search the remaining two men. Sanders claimed that he was not associated with the other two men and was on his way to work at a barbershop. During the search of Allen Sanders a .32 caliber revolver was found in his coat pocket. Sanders was placed under arrest and taken to the squad car. Just then Bellamy returned to the scene with a handgun he obtained at a nearby barbershop. Bellamy told Sanders to “get their guns.“ The patrolmen were disarmed by Sanders and ordered to enter their patrol car with the offenders. Officer Cambric then drew his concealed backup weapon and a gun battle ensued. As Cambric drew his weapon, Sanders saw him doing it and yelled “look out. He's got a gun.“ Bellamy and Sanders immediately started shooting at Officer Cambric as he dove for cover. Officer Cambric would later testify that after he dove for cover he saw Bellamy standing over Officer Ferguson with two guns pointed at his back. The gunmen then fled the scene. In all six shots were exchanged during the gunfight. Officer Ferguson was shot four times in the face, neck, left arm and abdomen. He was transported to Michael Reese Hospital by beat 273 where he was pronounced dead at 10:25 p.m. on December 27, 1968. Officer Cambric suffered minor shrapnel wounds and recovered.

Following the incident a large manhunt for Bellamy, Hayden and Sanders was conducted. On December 29, 1968, Sanders was apprehended at his apartment and charged with first degree murder. Hayden was found three weeks later beaten to death on the south side. In February, 1970, Bellamy was captured and also charged with first degree murder. In March, 1970, Bellamy was found guilty and sentenced to 199 years in prison during a separate trial. On December 4, 1970, Sanders was found guilty during a jury trial and on December 30, 1970, he was sentenced to 70 to 100 years in prison for the murder of Officer Ferguson. Sanders was also sentenced to serve a consecutive sentence of 15 to 30 years for the attempted murder of Officer Cambric. Bellamy later died in prison.

Officer Ferguson was waked at Kenny Brothers Funeral Home located at 5438 South Halsted Street, his funeral mass was held at Visitation Catholic Church located at 843 West Garfield Boulevard and he was laid to rest on December 30, 1968 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph Francis Ferguson, born May 17, 1943, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 14, 1965. He earned 1 Award of Valor (Posthumously), 1 Blue Star Award (Posthumously) and 4 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Ferguson was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, Fraternal Order of Police and the St. Jude League. He was survived by his wife, Tanya (nee Vegel); children: Elizabeth Ann, age 3 and Joseph Francis, Jr., age 5; mother: Edith (nee Loftus) and siblings: Edith Mary Cespedes, Linda Krasovkis, Ozzie, Robert J. and William A. (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #G487763.

In 2003, 35 years later, an anonymous juror wrote the following on a memorial webpage for Patrolman Ferguson. “I served on the jury of one of the defendants accused and later convicted of this horrible tragedy. I vividly remember when Officer Ferguson's blood soaked jacket was shown to us. This was a senseless tragedy that I'll never forget, even though the trial was about 35 years ago. I was the first and youngest juror selected. I'm no longer young, but I still think about Officer Ferguson and his family frequently. I hope time has helped the family heal and recover from Officer Ferguson's senseless death.“

Patrolman Harry William Fielder

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Mar 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2130
Incident Date:
13 Apr 1931
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
42
End of Watch:
14 Apr 1931
Unit of Assignment:
23rd District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
27 Jan 1889
Served:
9 years, 1 month, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 30
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 31-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman Harry William Fielder, Star #2130, aged 42 years, was a 9 year, 1 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 23rd District - Marquette.

On April 13, 1931, at 12:10 a.m., Officer Fielder, while driving in his personal car, was struck by an ambulance at the intersection of 22nd Street and Damen Avenue. Officer Fielder was instructed to go to 21st and Ashland Avenue to assist in handling traffic which had greatly increased due to the Sanitary District Tunnel disaster and was given permission to use his own automobile. At approximately 6:30 p.m. a fire was accidentally started by workers attempting to locate a leak in the tunnel. Located at 22nd and Laflin Streets, 35 feet below ground more than sixty streets and sanitation laborers were on scene. The Chicago Fire Department responded to the scene to fight the fire. Several firefighters died and approximately forty were injured when they became trapped in the tunnel. They were overcome by the smoke and fumes which rendered them unconscious while attempting to rescue the streets and sanitation workers. Multiple ambulances rushed to and from various hospitals in the city transporting the injured. The ambulance in question was rushing back to the scene after taking injured firefighters to St. Anthony's Hospital after they were burned in the fire. Officer Fielder was taken to the hospital where he succumbed to his wounds the next day on April 14, 1931.

Officer Fielder was waked at his residence located at 4840 South Lexington Street, his funeral mass was held at Resurrection Church located at 5150 West Jackson Boulevard and he was laid to rest on April 17, 1931 in Mount Carmel Catholic Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Harry William Fielder, born January 27, 1889, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 9, 1922. He earned 3 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $240.00 during his career.

Officer Fielder was survived by his wife, Josephine (nee Gilbert); children: Margaret and Marion and parents: Charles and Minnie (nee Land).

Patrolman Edward C. Finegan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3444
Incident Date:
27 Mar 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
27 Mar 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 15 - Brighton Park
Date of Birth:
06 May 1898
Served:
3 years, 9 months, 20 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 16
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 56-E: 15

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward C. Finegan, Star #3444, aged 27 years, was a 3 year, 9 month, 20 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 15 - Brighton Park.

On March 27, 1926, at 2:30 p.m., Officer Finegan and his partner, Patrolman Edward Ruback, had pulled over a speeding auto on 39th Street approximately 50 feet east of South California Avenue. The vehicle was also reported stolen and as a result the officers arrested the driver and his passenger. Officer Finegan would transport the violators, Otto Hacker and Richard Evan, age 19 to the station while Officer Ruback followed behind in the stolen car. Finegan set off for the station with Hacker sitting beside him and Evan in the rear seat. Without warning Evan pulled out a gun and shot Officer Finnegan in the back of the head. Evan and Hacker then pushed Officer Finegan out of the automobile without slowing down. Tragically, when they pushed Finegan out of the car, his blue police coat got hung up on the cars running board, dragging him on the pavement. As the two men continued to escape, they dragged Finegan’s body alongside the car and it wasn’t until the car drove by the Brighton Park police station when Finegan’s body finally broke free and landed in front of the station. As the two men sped past the police station, Officer Ruback jumped out of his vehicle and began to fire at the Evans and Hacker. Hearing the commotion outside, Lieutenant Bert Cleghorn and Police Operator Joe Leonard ran outside. They attempted to fire at the fleeing felon’s but a crowd of children at a nearby playground was in the way. Officer Finegan died before he could be taken to a hospital.

On March 29, 1926, Richard Evan and Otto Hacker’s arrest was recommended by the Coroner. On April 16, 1926, Evan and Hacker were arrested in Midland, Texas in a stolen auto taken from W. W. Sherman of 6826 Bennett Avenue, Midland, Texas. On September 20, 1926, they were extradited back to Chicago and turned over to the Sheriff. On September 30, 1926, they were indicted. Hacker turned state’s evidence and testified at the trial against Evans. Richard Evan was found guilty and sentenced to hang on October 22, 1926 by Judge Harry B. Miller. His execution was postponed and on October 29, 1926, he was executed by hanging at Cook County Jail. On January 18, 1927, Otto Hacker was acquitted by Judge Lindsay.

Just before Evan was executed he called for reporters and made a full confession saying, “We had been drinking that day. I don’t suppose I would have killed the copper if I was cold sober. You know my mind was kind of hazy from the moonshine stuff we would get for .35 cents a shot. I fired the shots at Finegan, but then Hacker is just about as guilty as I. You know we had an understanding that if any policeman tried to interfere with us that we would kill him. That started soon after we went into the stickup game. A speed cop stopped us while we were going through Chicago Heights and Hacker pulled his gun and said if we are pinched we will knock him off. That happened later on at 55th and Halsted Streets, but both times we were let off. When Finegan started to take us to the station I just pulled my gun and fired.” Evans was a paroled convict from Pontiac Reformatory. He was paroled only three months prior to Officer Finegan’s murder.

Officer Finegan was waked at his residence, his funeral mass was held at St. Rita of Cascia Church located at 6243 South Fairfield Avenue and he was laid to rest on March 29, 1926 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman Edward C. Finegan, born May 6, 1898, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 7, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Finegan was survived by his wife, Francis (nee Walsh); mother, Margaret (nee Larson) and sisters: Agnes Hoppenrath and Myrtle Berglind.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8006.

Sergeant Frederick Fischer

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Park District Police Department
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
36
Incident Date:
21 Oct 1936
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
39
End of Watch:
22 Oct 1936
Unit of Assignment:
Patrol Division
Date of Birth:
13 Dec 1896
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Waldheim Cemetery - Forest Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 40
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Sergeant Frederick Fischer, Star #36, aged 39 years, was a veteran of the Chicago Park District Police Department, assigned to the Patrol Division.

On October 21, 1936, Sergeant Fischer was called to the scene of a traffic accident on Fullerton Parkway and North Lake Shore Drive, in Lincoln Park. George Levinson was driving his vehicle when it struck the vehicle of Arthur Cohen. While writing the crash report for the accident a third vehicle struck Levinson’s car pushing it into Sergeant Fischer. Cohen’s wife, who was injured in the first crash, was also injured in the second crash. Sergeant Fischer was mortally wounded. He was transported to Columbus Memorial Hospital where he died from the injuries he sustained the next day on October 22, 1936.

Sergeant Fischer was waked at Christ Nielsen Funeral Home located at 3301 West Fullerton Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at Christ Nielsen Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on October 26, 1936 in Waldheim Cemetery, 1400 Des Plaines Avenue, Forest Park, Illinois.

Sergeant Frederick Fischer was born on December 13, 1896.

Sergeant Fischer served in the U.S. Navy from July 26, 1918 thru June 19, 1919, was a veteran of World War I and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Fireman 1st Class Non-Petty Officer. He was also a member of the Chicago Park Policemen’s Benevolent Association. Sergeant Fischer was survived by his wife, Clara; daughter, Muriel; mother, Mathilda (nee Schaefer) and siblings: Arthur, Charles, Martha Amerski, Max and William.

The Chicago Park District Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on December 31, 1957. On January 1, 1958, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Police Department through an intergovernmental agreement. Fallen officers of the Chicago Park District Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Sergeant Claude M. Fisher

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
03 May 1954
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1570
Incident Date:
19 Apr 1966
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
39
End of Watch:
19 Apr 1966
Unit of Assignment:
21st District - Hyde Park
Date of Birth:
08 Aug 1926
Served:
11 years, 11 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 13
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 26-E: 1

Incident Details:

Sergeant Claude M. Fisher, Star #1570, aged 39 years, was an 11 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 21st District - Wabash.

On April 19, 1966, at 1:30 a.m., Sergeant Fisher was off duty at O'Reilly's Tavern located at 4622 South Western Avenue. While sitting at the bar he observed four suspicious subjects walk by the front of the tavern. A few seconds later, the front door opened and three men walked in, Alfred Armstrong, age 23, armed with a shotgun, Andrew L. Hale, age 19, Vern Rhodes and Jerry Sumlin, age 18, armed with a revolver. They immediately announced a hold up. Seeing their weapons, Sergeant Fisher drew his service revolver. Armstrong wheeled on him and fired twice from the shotgun. Sumlin, still standing at the door, also fired delivering the fatal shots. Armstrong then fired another blast. Sergeant Fisher returned fire twice striking Armstrong in his hand before slumping unconscious to the floor as the gunmen fled the tavern. During the firefight, Sergeant Fisher raised his hands toward his face at the moment Armstrong fired and his thumb and finger on one hand were severed by the shotgun blast. Armstong, Sumlin, and Hale fled and were met by a fourth man, Vernon Rhodes, age 19, waiting in a light colored Cadillac in which they made good their escape. Sergeant Fisher was transported to Central Community Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds an hour later.

The following day, Area 4 General Assignment detectives had a suspect in custody for complicity in an assault upon a teacher at Marshall High School. It appeared he had gunshot wounds of the left hand and forearm. Detectives noted the physical similarity to one of the wanted men. Confronted with the evidence, the suspect confessed and gave the names of his three accomplices. They were quickly rounded up and all admitted to being present during the incident.

On April 29, 1966, All four defendants were indicted by the Grand Jury for murder and two counts of robbery. Sumlin entered a plea of guilty. On September 16, 1966, Andrew Hale was acquitted of murder by Judge Edward J. Egan. Alfred Armstrong and Vernon Rhodes also stood trial and were found guilty. On October 17, 1966, Rhodes and Sumlin were sentenced to 50 to 100 years and Armstrong was sentenced to 100 to 150 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.

Sergeant Fisher was waked at Rozdilsky & Sons Funeral Home located at 5040 South Western Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at Rozdilsky & Sons Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on April 22, 1966 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Sergeant Claude M. Fisher, born August 5, 1926, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 3, 1954.

Sergeant Fisher was survived by his wife, Gloria Mae (nee Halko); children: Catherine, Gail, Karen, Michael and Sandra; mother, Pearl Prestin and siblings: Grace Nimczak and Ralph.

Patrolman Austin Levi Fitch

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Aug 1911
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
16 Nov 1914
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
33
End of Watch:
24 Nov 1914
Unit of Assignment:
District 10, 17th Precinct - Englewood
Date of Birth:
23 Dec 1880
Served:
3 years, 3 months, 15 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Greenwood Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 25
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 5
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 19-E: 30

Incident Details:

Patrolman Austin L. Fitch, Star # Unknown, aged 33 years, was a 3 year, 3 month, 15 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 10, 17th Precinct - Englewood.

On November 16, 1914, Officer Fitch was on patrol driving his police motorcycle. At 4358 South Honore Street he attempted to avoid colliding with a pedestrian, Henry Horner, age 35, of 2945 South Michigan Avenue. Unable to avoid the collision, he struck Horner and lost control of the motorcycle. Officer Fitch was thrown from the motorcycle and sustained a skull fracture. Horner sustained a laceration to the scalp and a broken right collarbone. Officer Fitch was transported to Mercy Hospital where he was pronounced dead, eight days later, at 12:00 p.m. on November 24, 1914.

Horner was the grandson of a very successful Jewish Grocer. He would recover from his injuries and have a very successful career in politics. He eventually became Governor of Illinois serving from 1933 until his death in 1940.

Officer Fitch was waked at his residence located at 6035 South Honore Street, his funeral mass was held at Mount Greenwood Cemetery and he was laid to rest on November 27, 1914 in Mount Greenwood Cemetery, 2900 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Austin L. Fitch, born December 23, 1880, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 9, 1911.

Officer Fitch was survived by his wife, Flora (nee Gleson); five small children; parents: Austin J. and Frances. J. (nee Pearl) and siblings: Henry Gleason, Thomas, Mrs. Arthur Ackerman and Mrs. John Brookheizer.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On July 17, 2018, Officer Fitch's star was retired by Superintendent of Police Eddie T. Johnson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Dennis C. Fitzgerald

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Jan 1888
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
786
Incident Date:
26 Sep 1903
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
49
End of Watch:
20 Jan 1904
Unit of Assignment:
District 4, 11th Precinct - Fiftieth Street
Date of Birth:
1854
Served:
16 years, 0 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 34
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 63-E: 10

Incident Details:

Patrolman Dennis C. Fitzgerald, Star #786, aged 49 years, was a 16 year, 0 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 4, 11th Precinct - Fiftieth Street.

On September 26, 1903, Officer Fitzgerald observed two intoxicated men, John Johnson and Louis Tedford, creating a disturbance on the street at 44th Street and Indiana Avenue. Officer Fitzgerald remonstrated the men and commanded they move on. Officer Fitzgerald then turned to leave when Johnson and Telford attacked the officer. Johnson seized the officer's club, and as he attempted to rise struck him on the head and again knocked him down. Both men kicked him. Officer Fitzgerald was attempting to arise again when Johnson took the officer's revolver from his pocket and struck him on the head. Knocking him down again for a third time, and as he attempted to rise fired one shot, the bullet striking Officer Fitzgerald in the abdomen. Regaining his feet, Officer Fitzgerald grappled with Telford, and as he did so Johnson fired at him from behind, the bullet striking him in the right shoulder. Both his assailants ran and were followed by the intrepid officer as far as 45th Street and Indiana Avenue where he collapsed, overcome by his injuries. By this time, the gunfire had attracted other officers, who quickly summoned the patrol wagon. Officer Fitzgerald was rushed to Mercy Hospital where he lingered for four months before succumbing to his injuries on January 20, 1904.

Louis Telford was arrested first at 3221 West Dearborn Street as he slept. During questioning, Telford confessed and fingered Johnson as the man who beat and shot Officer Fitzgerald. Telford claimed to have run away before Fitzgerald was shot, Johnson later rejoining him and saying, “I’ve got him and I’ve got his club, too.” John Johnson was later arrested at 2701 South State Street after being shot in the jaw by Newton Moody during another disturbance. Johnson had gone to a resort where he encountered Moody. Moody was upset at Johnson’s presence and shot him. As Johnson ran from the resort he dropped a revolver, the very same one he had taken from Officer Fitzgerald. Another policemen found him in a doorway and arrested him.

Both men were charged with Assault with Intent to Murder. While being held awaiting trial, Officer Fitzgerald died. On January 20, 1904, the Coroner's Jury recommended Johnson and Telford be held without bail. On March 5, 1904, Johnson was sentenced to hang on December 14, 1904 and Telford to 14 years in Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Johnson's hanging was respited and he was hanged in the County Jail on January 20, 1905.

Officer Fitzgerald was waked at 4428 South Wabash Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Elizabeth Church located at 50 East 41st Street and he was laid to rest on January 22, 1904 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Dennis C. Fitzgerald, born in 1854, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 14, 1888.

Officer Fitzgerald was survived by his wife, Margaret, age 52.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #754.

Patrolman Joseph Michael Fitzpatrick

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Jan 1911
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
210
Incident Date:
25 Oct 1930
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
45
End of Watch:
25 Oct 1930
Unit of Assignment:
Traffic Division
Date of Birth:
27 Apr 1885
Served:
19 years, 9 months, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 28
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 58-E: 2

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph Michael Fitzpatrick, Star #210, aged 45 years, was a 19 year, 9 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Traffic Division.

On October 25, 1930, at 5:45 p.m., Officer Fitzpatrick, while off duty, was going to visit his sister who lived at the Hayes Hotel located at 6345 South University Avenue. Just as he exited his automobile at the northeast corner of 64th Street and University Avenue, he was accosted by five armed men who announced a robbery. Officer Fitzpatrick resisted and drew his weapon firing at the robbers. A gun battle took place and Officer Fitzpatrick was mortally wounded. Fitzpatrick was able to fire off three rounds before he was struck in the chest, just under the heart. The bandits fled in an automobile and made good their escape.

Detectives investigating Officer Fitzpatrick’s murder recovered a brown coat with a pistol in the pocket. The pistol was believed to be the murder weapon and was subjected to ballistic tests. Unfortunately, ballistic tests were inconclusive and no further developments were made. The bandits have never been identified and are still at large.

Officer Fitzpatrick was waked at his residence located at 907 West Garfield Boulevard, his funeral mass was held in Requiem at Visitation Catholic Church located at 843 West Garfield Boulevard and was laid to rest on October 29, 1930 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph Michael Fitzpatrick, born April 27, 1885, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 7, 1911. Officer Fitzpatrick was a highly regarded member of the force who had spent many years working at Madison and Canal Streets directing traffic before being assigned the busy intersection of Monroe and Dearborn Streets.

Officer Fitzpatrick was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Marie (nee Leona); daughter, Marie Leona, age 8 and sister, Mary A.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #9961.

Patrolman Luke John Fitzpatrick

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
31 Jul 1894
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1084
Incident Date:
19 Nov 1906
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
36
End of Watch:
19 Nov 1906
Unit of Assignment:
District 5, 12th Precinct - Woodlawn
Date of Birth:
16 Feb 1870
Served:
12 years, 3 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. James at Sag Bridge Cemetery - Lemont, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 36
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 9-W: 4

Incident Details:

Patrolman Luke John Fitzpatrick, Star #1084, aged 36 years, was a 12 year, 3 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 5, 12th Precinct - Woodlawn.

On November 19, 1906, at 1:25 a.m., Officer Fitzpatrick was passing the corner of 63rd Street and Madison Avenue (present day Dorchester Avenue). As he passed he was approached by the conductor of an incoming South Chicago electric car at the Dorchester Station of the Southside Elevated Railroad. The conductor stated that two men who had been passengers on the car had just entered the station and had been overheard to say they had committed a burglary, blowing a safe in a Hammond, Indiana grocery store. Officer Fitzpatrick summoned Probationary Patrolman John J. Murphy and the officers then entered the elevated station. On sight of the officers the two men, Charles Hanson and Guy Van Tassell, commenced shooting. Officer Fitzpatrick sustained four gunshot wounds, one in the head and three in the abdomen. Meanwhile Officer Murphy was struck with some kind of instrument as he was passing the turnstile to aid Fitzpatrick, and his revolver was knocked from his hand. He hastened to call help and the murderers fled. Patrolman WilIiam H. Birch, who was attracted by the gunfire, ran up the stairs leading to the platform. Part way up the stairs he was fired upon by a man who was descending the same stairs and who afterward gave the name of Charles Hanson, one of Officer Fitzpatrick's assailants. Officer Birch returned the fire, his bullet striking Hanson in the abdomen. He kept on running but was soon overtaken in a nearby alley and arrested by Officers Birch and J. H. Wilson. Officer Fitzpatrick was taken to St. Bernard Hospital where he died from the effect of his wounds at 5:45 a.m. the same day.

Guy Van Tassell, age 34, who had been Hanson's companion in the shooting, escaped and was a fugitive from justice until he was arrested. Hanson, while seriously injured, recovered from his wounds and stood trial for murder. Investigation proved that these two desperadoes had committed the burglary in Hammond, several hundred dollars worth of the proceeds of which was found in Hanson's possession, which was later identified and returned to the owner.

Charles Hanson had served time in five different prisons for several robberies, thefts, burglaries, and safe cracking. He was convicted of Patrolman Fitzpatrick's murder and sentenced to life in prison on May 2, 1907.

On November 23, 1906, Hanson was held by Coroner's Jury. On April 30, 1907, Hanson was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Kersten. On June 29, 1907, Guy Van Tassell was arrested in San Francisco and brought back to Chicago. On December 5, 1907, Van Tassell was found guilty by a jury in Judge Kersten's court. On December 10, 1907, he was also sentenced to life in Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.

On January 4, 1947, Charles Hanson was released from prison. The judge who ordered his release stated that his constitutional right to have a speedy trial had been violated because more than four terms of court passed before he was tried for Patrolman Fitzpatrick's murder.

Officer Fitzpatrick was waked at his residence located at No. 6040 South Evans Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Holy Cross Church located at 4541 South Wood Street and he was laid to rest on November 11, 1906 in St. James at Sag Bridge Cemetery, 10600 South Archer Avenue, Lemont, Illinois. His Grave is located in Section E.

Patrolman Luke John Fitzpatrick, born February 16, 1870, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 31, 1894.

Officer Fitzpatrick was a member of the Emery A. Storrs Council No. 1071, Royal Arcanum. He was survived by his siblings: Dennis, James J., Theresa and Mrs. Catherine Sweeney.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #771.

On October 14, 1910, Officer Fitzpatrick's star was retired by General Superintendent LeRoy T. Steward and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, City Hall, 121 North LaSalle Street, Room 505, Office of the Superintendent of Police. Officer Shea's star was one of fourteen stars added to the newly instituted memorial to preserve the memory of officers killed in the line of duty. The tradition of retiring a star number was born. In 1928, the star case was moved to the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters again moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Fitzpatrick's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Dec 1884
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
691
Incident Date:
04 May 1886
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
08 May 1886
Unit of Assignment:
4th Precinct - Rawson Street Station
Date of Birth:
1859
Served:
1 year, 4 months, 23 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 10
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 11-W: 2

Incident Details:

Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, Star #691, aged 27 years, was a 1 year, 5 month, 23 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th Precinct - Rawson Street Station.

On May 4, 1886, Officer Flavihan was with other officers assigned to disperse protesters near Haymarket Square. A bomb was thrown and exploded amidst the officers. The explosion was then followed by an intense gun battle. Officer Flavihan was shot in the back and the bomb tore apart his leg, requiring amputation. He was taken to Cook County Hospital where his leg was amputated on May 7, 1886. Doctors had high hopes of a full recovery until his condition began to deteriorate. The next day his health rapidly declined and he died at 3:00 p.m. on May 8, 1886. Father A. J. Burns and three Religious Sisters of Mercy were at his bedside throughout his final hours. He was the fourth of eight officers to die in the Haymarket Tragedy.

Eight men were arrested and charged with the officers’ murders. Seven were convicted of murder and sentenced to death. The other one was sentenced to 15 years in prison. On November 11, 1887, four of them were executed by hanging. The day before one of the suspects killed himself in his cell with a smuggled dynamite cap, which he detonated in his mouth. The other three were pardoned by Governor John P. Altgeld in 1893.

Nine police officers died after or were killed during the Haymarket Riot labor dispute. The officers were at the scene of a civil disorder when the rioters opened fire and threw a bomb into the crowd. Seven policemen suffered fatal wounds, two policemen suffered serious injury which would later lead to their death and 70 other people were injured by the explosion and ensuing gunfire.

The officers who were killed in or as a result of the Haymarket Riot, in order of their death, include:

  • Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, End of Watch May 4, 1886
  • Patrolman John J. Barrett, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman George F. Miller, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, End of Watch May 8, 1886
  • Patrolman Michael Sheehan, End of Watch May 9, 1886
  • Patrolman Nels Hansen, End of Watch May 14, 1886
  • Patrolman Thomas Redden, End of Watch May 16, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy O'Sullivan, End of Watch June 14, 1888
  • Patrolman Patrick Hartford, End of Watch November 26, 1897

Officer Flavihan was laid to rest in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, born in 1859, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 15, 1884.

Officer Flavihan was survived by his wife and three children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #697 and Case #2743.

In response to the tragic events of May 4, 1886 a commemorative nine-foot (2.7 meter) bronze statue of a Chicago policeman was commissioned to honor the sacrifice of the policemen who lost their lives that fateful night. The statue was designed by Frank Batchelder of St. Paul Minnesota in 1889 and sculpted by sculptor Johannes Gelert of New York, New York. The statue's marble pedestal was ordered to have an inscription on it. The inscription is the command that Captain William Ward delivered in the Haymarket just before the bomb was thrown that fateful night: "In the name of the People of Illinois, I command peace." The statue was funded by private funds raised by the Union League Club of Chicago. The statue would become the first known monument erected in the United States honoring policemen. Erected in the middle of Haymarket Square located on Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, the statue was unveiled on May 30, 1889. The unveiling was conducted by Frank Degan, the son of Officer Mathias Degan who was killed in the Haymarket Affair. Over the years the statue would be moved seven times, it would also be repaired and rebuilt several times due to vandalism.

  • Location #1 - Haymarket Square (May 30, 1889 thru July, 1900): Haymarket Square was the first location in which the statue would be erected. It was placed in the middle of Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, as seen in the image above. The statue interfered with the flow of traffic in this busy area, and it became an object of vandalism. As a result, it was moved in 1900 about one mile west, to Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue, near Union Park.

  • Location #2 - Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue (July, 1900 thru 1928): The statue remained at its second location for just over 27 years. A medallion, which is evident in the photo above, is located just above the inscription. Also visible are two white dots just below the inscription. Those two dots are of the original mounting holes for the medallion. It is believed that due to vandalism, the medallion was moved higher up the monuments pedestal. On May 4, 1927, the 41st anniversary of the Haymarket affair, a Chicago Surface Lines streetcar jumped its tracks and crashed into the statue's pedestal. The force of the crash dislodged the statue from the pedestal and the statue fell over falling off the base. The motorman, William Schultz, of the streetcar stated that the brakes failed as he was rounding the corner. He also later said that he was "sick of seeing that policeman with his arm raised." The city restored the statue in 1928 and moved the pedestal and statue into nearby Union Park.

  • Location #3 - Union Park (1928 thru June 2, 1957): The monument was located near Washington Boulevard on the North side of the street facing south and it remained in Union Park for nearly three decades. The finials, which flank the pedestal, had been modified after one of the monument's earlier moves. This change is believed to be the result of vandal damage or from being stripped at various times. During the 1950's, construction of the Kennedy Expressway erased about half of the old, run-down Haymarket Square Area, and on June 2, 1957, the statue was moved to Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway.

  • Location #4 - Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway (June 2, 1957 thru February 5, 1972): The Statue was situated on the north side of Randolph Street a block west of Desplaines Street at 700 West Randolph Street, just to the east of the new Kennedy Expressway. A new platform was built to support the pedestal and statue overlooking the expressway, only 200 feet from its original location. After years of vandalism the pedestal was badly stained and chipped as can be seen in the photo above.

    On May 4, 1968, The Haymarket statue was vandalized with black paint, the 82nd anniversary of the Haymarket affair, following a confrontation between police and demonstrators at a protest against the Vietnam War. The city named the monument a historic landmark in the mid-1960’s, but this did not prevent further vandalism, presumably in protest against police brutality in the context of opposition to the Vietnam War and social inequality in the United States. On October 6, 1969, in what was almost certainly a deliberate symbolic reenactment of the original Haymarket meeting, someone placed a powerful explosive between the legs of the statue, blowing out about a hundred windows nearby and sending chunks of the statue's legs onto the expressway below. Weather Underground members, known as Weatherman, took credit for the blast and battled police elsewhere in the streets of Chicago over several days. The statue was rebuilt and unveiled on May 4, 1970.

    The statue was repaired, but early on the morning of October 5, 1970, it was blown up again. The body of the statue badly bent a nearby railing as it fell before settling on the expressway embankment, and one of the legs landed two hundred feet away. Immediately after the blast, a person or persons called various news outlets to declare that the bombing was the work of the Weathermen. According to one newspaper, the caller said, "We just blew up Haymarket Square Statue for the second year in a row to show our allegiance to our brothers in the New York prisons and our black brothers everywhere. This is another phase of our revolution to overthrow our racist and fascist society. Power to the People." The two attacks on the police statue were among several politically-motivated bombings throughout the country at the time.

    An angry and determined Mayor Richard J. Daley had the statue repaired again and put under 24 police protection. On February 5, 1972, the statue was moved to the State Street Chicago Police Headquarters Building. The pedestal remained at this location for 24 more years and was finally removed in 1996. It is unknown whether the pedestal was scrapped or placed into storage by the city.

  • Location #5 - State Street Chicago Police Headquarters (February 5, 1972 thru October 5, 1976): On February 5, 1972, the statue was placed on a new marble pedestal located in the lobby of the State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building at 1121 South State Street. The statue remained on display in the headquarters lobby for four years and eight months. On October 5, 1976, the statue was then relocated to the new Chicago Police Training Academy. The State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building has since been razed and a new commercial and residential complex was built in its place.

  • Location #6 - Chicago Police Training Academy (October 5, 1976 thru June 1, 2007): On October 5, 1976, the statue was moved from the Old Chicago Police Headquarters Building and placed on a new granite pedestal, located in a secure outdoor courtyard at the Chicago Police Training Academy located at 1300 West Jackson Street for twenty years.

  • Location #7 - Michigan Avenue Chicago Police Headquarters (June 1, 2007 thru Present): On June 1, 2007 the statue was rededicated at Chicago Police Headquarters located at 3501 South State Street and placed on a new pedestal. The rededication unveiling was conducted by Geraldine Doceka, Officer Mathias Degan's great-granddaughter. The statue currently resides at this location.

Evidence Technician Michael Ronald Flisk Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
30 Jan 1991
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6962
Incident Date:
26 Nov 2010
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
46
End of Watch:
26 Nov 2010
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 477 - Evidence Technician Team - South
Date of Birth:
11 Jan 1964
Served:
19 years, 9 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 16
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 24-E: 27

Incident Details:

Evidence Technician Michael Ronald Flisk, Jr., Star #6962, aged 46 years, was a 19 year, 9 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 477 - Evidence Technician Team - South.

On November 26, 2010, at 1:30 p.m., Officer Flisk was dispatched to the 8100 block of South Burnham Avenue to collect evidence from retired Chicago Housing Authority Police Officer, Stephen Peters, age 44, vehicle. Peters customized mustang had been broken into and had its stereo equipment stolen. Officer Flisk was collecting fingerprint evidence from the vehicle when the offender, Timothy Herring, Jr., age 19, returned to the scene. In an effort to evade arrest, Herring told Peters that he knew who had broken into the vehicle. Peters replied that Officer Flisk had recovered fingerprints from the vehicle. Herring, a parolee, understood it would only be a matter of time before police traced the fingerprints back to him through his previous arrest records. He was determined not to return to prison after having served a six-year prison sentence for armed robbery. Herring pretended to walk away when he removed his gun and shot Flisk and Peters. He left the scene and attempted to discard the stolen radio equipment when he noticed one of his victims moving. He walked back and shot Flisk and Peters again. Officer Flisk and Peters died at the scene.

Timothy Herring, Jr., was arrested three days later and charged with two counts of 1st degree murder and for burglary. He was also charged with attempted murder in an unrelated shooting that took place in June. A second male was charged with obstruction of justice and unlawful possession of a firearm for hiding the murder weapon for Herring. Herring was on parole at the time of the shooting. Herring stood trial and on May 6, 2015 he was found guilty. On June 26, 2015, Herring was convicted and sentenced to Natural Life with no parole. He was also sentenced to 14 years for the burglary.

Officer Flisk was waked at Brady and Gill Funeral Home located at 2929 West 87th Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Rita of Cascia Shrine Chapel located at 7740 South Western Avenue and he was laid to rest on December 1, 2010 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Evidence Technician Michael Ronald Flisk, Jr., born January 11, 1964, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 30, 1991. He earned 55 Honorable Mentions among many other notable achievements during his career.

Officer Flisk was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Nora M. (nee O'Brien); children: Brian Patrick, age 17, Margaret Kathryn, age 20, Michael John, age 24 and Timothy Joseph, age 21; parents: Kathryn (nee Taylor) and Michael Ronald, Sr. (CFD); and siblings: Martin, Maureen (CPD), Margaret (CPD) and Timothy (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HS633585.

On August 10, 2011, Officer Flisk's star was retired by Superintendent Garry McCarthy and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

On December 9, 2018, the 9900 block of South Artesian Avenue was dedicated as "Honorary Officer Michael Flisk Avenue." One brown honorary street sign was erected. The sign was located on the northeast corner of 100th Street and Artesian Avenue in the heart of the Beverly community on the block where Officer Flisk lived.

Patrolman William Aristotle Flowers Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Oct 1954
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1872
Incident Date:
26 Oct 1960
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
26 Oct 1960
Unit of Assignment:
27th District - Warren
Date of Birth:
08 Aug 1927
Served:
6 years, 0 months, 25 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 8
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-W: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Aristotle Flowers, Sr., Star #1872, aged 32 years, was a 6 year, 0 month, 25 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 27th District - Warren.

On October 26, 1960, Officer Flowers and his partner, Patrolman Henry Pates, were working the third watch in citizen's dress. While in the 27th District Station Mr. Henry Saunders came in and told the officers he was having trouble with a neighbor, Johnny Barker, age 33, of 53 North Washtenaw Avenue, who was having an affair with his wife. Mr. Saunders added that this adulterer had threatened him several times and that he would call the station when he knew he was at home.

At about 9:00 p.m., Officers Flowers and Pates received a call from Mr. Saunders stating that Mr. Barker was in his apartment. The officers responded to 2673 West Washington Boulevard and met Mr. Saunders. They then relocated to the building manager's apartment in the basement of the building. The manager told the officers to be careful of Barker, as he was known to have several weapons in his apartment.

At about 9:28 p.m., the officers arrived on scene and proceeded to have Mr. Saunders point out the apartment from the alley entrance. As they reached the alley and entered, Johnny Barker walked into the alley with a .25 caliber semi-automatic Beretta pistol in his hand and immediately opened fire on both officers and Mr. Saunders. Officer Flowers was shot in the left shoulder beside 49 West Washtenaw Avenue in the alley and fell mortally wounded. He never had a chance to draw his weapon. Officer Pates returned fire and chased Barker to 51-53 North Washtenaw Avenue. They ran up the back stairs exchanging gunfire all the way to Barkers third floor apartment. Both Barker and Officer Pates emptied their pistols. Barker was shot four times in his chest and side but dragged himself into his apartment, slamming the door shut. Before breaking the door down and pursuing Barker, Officer Pates awaited backup. Additional officers arrived at the scene and they entered the apartment, breaking down the door. Barker was found lying on the floor, wounded, still grasping his gun. He was placed into custody without further incident.

Officer Flowers was transported to Illinois Research Hospital by Squadroll #246 from the 27th District where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Robinson. Barker was also taken to Illinois Research Hospital by Squadroll #272 from the 30th District where he was treated for his six gunshot wounds and confined under police guard. He recovered from his wounds and was charged with the murder of Officer Flowers.

On November 28, 1960, Flowers was held to the Coroner's Inquest. He refused to give a statement and was held in Cook County Jail pending a Grand Jury hearing. On Decemebr 13, 1960, Flowers case was heard by a Grand Jury which returned a True Bill. On March 6, 1961, Barker was found guilty and sentenced to 25 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. On May 1, 1961 he also pleaded guilty to assault to murder and was sentenced to 5 to 14 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.

Officer Flowers was waked at McDonald Funeral Home located at 8138 South Cottage Grove Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Jubilee CME Temple located at 117 East 59th Street and he was laid to rest on October 31, 1960 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman William Aristotle Flowers, Sr., born August 8, 1927, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 1, 1954.

Officer Flowers served in the U.S. Army and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Jewel; children: Roseland, age 8, and William Aristotle, Jr., age 10 and parents: Dollie Lewis and William.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department Accident Report No. 745968-69, Case No. 60-2941-F, Central Complaint Room No. 141980 and Station Complaint No. 223674.

In January, 1961, Officer Flower's star was retired by Superintendent Orlando W. Wilson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Flower's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman Benjamin Fogarty

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
20 Jun 1889
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
26 Jul 1908
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
45
End of Watch:
03 Aug 1908
Unit of Assignment:
District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards
Date of Birth:
1863
Served:
19 years, 1 month, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Unknown Cemetery - Providence, Rhode Island
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Benjamin Fogarty, Star # Unknown, aged 46 years, was a 19 year, 1 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 8th District, 19th Precinct - 47th Place and Halsted Street Station.

On July 26, 1908, Officer Fogarty was on duty at 22nd and State Streets. He was struck by an auto driven by Louis W. Pope and sustained severe injuries. Officer Fogarty was taken to the hospital where he succumbed to his injuries eight days later on August 3, 1908.

Louis W. Pope was arrested and was exonerated by a Coroner's Verdict.

Officer Fogarty was waked at Kenny and Company Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on August 5, 1908 in Providence, Rhode Island.

Patrolman Benjamin Fogarty, born in 1863, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 20, 1889.

Officer Fogarty was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2841.

Patrolman Patrick Fogarty

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1352
Incident Date:
02 Jul 1911
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
41
End of Watch:
02 Jul 1911
Unit of Assignment:
District 4, 10th Precinct - Hyde Park
Date of Birth:
06 Mar 1870
Served:
5 years, 2 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 10
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 40
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 40-E: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman Patrick Fogarty, Star #1352, aged 41 years, was a 5 year, 2 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 4, 10th Precinct - Hyde Park.

On July 1, 1911, Officer Fogarty was off duty and out with his nephew, Michael Hannon. The two had spent the night taking in a picture show and then visiting several saloons with a small group of friends. At the end of the night, Officer Fogarty returned to his nephew's boarding house to see him home safely. On July 2, 1911, at 2:15 a.m., Officer Fogarty was leaving his nephew's residence and was just outside the front door when three men approached him. While in front of 743 West Pearce Street (present day Tilden Street) he was attacked by John Gay. During the struggle, Gay gained control of the officer's weapon when the gun discharged. The three bandits then fled. Fogarty's nephew heard the gunfire and ran outside to find Officer Fogarty lying on the sidewalk just 25 feet from his front door. Officer Fogarty was struck in the groin and was rushed to Grace Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries at 3:00 p.m. the same day.

In the aftermath, an investigation was conducted and a great deal of the details of the incident remained shrouded in mystery. Many witnesses gave statements, but were very inebriated. It was believed through the investigation that the shooting was an act of revenge by a man Officer Fogarty had arrested. One witness, Bernard Friedman of 731 West Pearce Street gave a statement. Although inebriated, he related to investigators that he “heard one of Fogarty's assailants say 'You are the fellow who tried to arrest us.' Two men rushed upon the policeman. The first man struck him on the jaw, knocking him against the railing guarding the stairway. Then the other fellow struck Fogarty and knocked him to the walk. Fogarty tried to reach for his pistol, but the first thug was too quick for the officer and shot him. Then they ran. It was over in a minute. I believe I will be able to identify the men.“

On July 14, 1911, John Gay was arrested on suspicion of the crime and confessed during questioning the same day. On January 13, 1912, he was found guilty and sentenced to the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.

Officer Fogarty was waked at his residence located at 5247 South May Street and he was laid to rest on July 5, 1911 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Patrick Fogarty, born on March 18, 1870, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 9, 1906.

Officer Fogarty was survived by his wife, Hannah.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Park Policeman Matthew J. Foley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
170
Incident Date:
12 Sep 1918
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle (Pursuit)
Age:
44
End of Watch:
12 Sep 1918
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
11 Apr 1874
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 10
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 54
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 60-E: 5

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Matthew J. Foley, Star #170, aged 44 years, was a veteran of the South Park Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On September 12, 1918, Officer Foley was in pursuit of a speeding vehicle near Jackson Park when he lost control of his police motorcycle. Officer Foley was rushed to Illinois Central Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries several hours later on the same day.

Officer Foley was waked at his residence located at 5545 South Union Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Visitation Catholic Church located at 843 West Garfield Boulevard and he was laid to rest on September 16, 1918 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Section 41, Lot 160.

Park Policeman Matthew J. Foley was born on April 11, 1874.

Officer Foley was a member of Division No. 10 Ancient Order of Hibernians. He was survived by his siblings: Peter, Thomas and Mrs. William Bulfin.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The South Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park district police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the South Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Dell Otis Fountain

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
17 May 1993
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
18247
Incident Date:
22 Mar 1996
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
40
End of Watch:
22 Mar 1996
Unit of Assignment:
15th District - Austin
Date of Birth:
23 Mar 1955
Served:
2 years, 10 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Goshen Cemetery - Belzoni, Mississippi
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 10
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Dell Otis Fountain, Star #18247, aged 40 years, was a 2 year, 10 month, 5 days veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 15th District - Austin.

On March 22, 1996, at 9:31 p.m., Officer Fountain's son, Dell Woodard, age 16, tried to enter their apartment building on the 3934 West Van Buren Street. Woodard was harassed and denied entrance to the building by Tajuan Murray, age 27, a guest of the upstairs tenant. Murray was an ex-convict who was on parole while awaiting trial for murder. It was the second time Woodard had been harassed. In a previous unrelated incident, a guest of the same tenant had confronted Woodard with a rifle. During the first incident, his father notified police and the man was arrested and the rifle seized. When Woodard finally accessed his first floor apartment, he told his father about the incident that had just occurred. Officer Fountain exited his apartment with his 9mm weapon and went to confront Murray. Murray headed upstairs as Officer Fountain followed behind him. The ex-convict was aware Mr. Fountain was a Chicago Police Officer and began struggling with him in an attempt to disarm him. As Murray grabbed for the gun, it discharged and the officer was shot in the upper right leg; severing a major artery. Officer Fountain was transported to Cook County Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 10:13 p.m. on March 22, 1996.

Tajuan Murray was arrested, stood trial and was convicted of 1st degree murder. On October 6, 1998, Murray was sentenced to life in prison. Murray's conviction was overturned in 2001 and a new trial was ordered.

Officer Fountain was waked at A. A. Rayner and Sons Funeral Home located at 5911 West Madison Street, his funeral mass was held at Salem Baptist Church of Chicago located at 11816 South Indiana Avenue and he was laid to rest on March 28, 1996 in Goshen Cemetery, Belzoni, Mississippi.

Patrolman Dell O. Fountain, born March 23, 1955, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 17, 1993.

Officer Fountain was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his girlfriend, Willie Ruth Woodard; children, Dell Otis Woodard (USMC), age 16, Isaiah Devante Woodard, age 2 and Yashanna LaGrace Woodard, age 12; parents: Adam and Lucy (nee Lewis); two brothers and five sisters.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #A192882.

On August 8, 1996, Officer Fountain's star was retired by Superintendent Matt L. Rodriguez and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Fountain's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

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