LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

  • The results are being filtered by the character: G
1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman William George Gagler

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
10 Mar 1921
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1634
Incident Date:
18 Jun 1932
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
19 Jun 1932
Unit of Assignment:
4th District - Stanton
Date of Birth:
24 Jun 1893
Served:
11 years, 3 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 33
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 21-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman William George Gagler, Star #1634, aged 38 years, was an 11 year, 3 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th District - Stanton.

On June 18, 1932, Officer Gagler was on patrol with Sergeant Grover J. Gormley and Patrolman Frank Bergan. The officers were passing 3117 South State Street when they spotted the wife of Sandy Spears, age 42, sitting on a truck in front of her residence. The sergeant ordered Officer Bergen to stop the squad car to determine if Mr. Spears was at home. Spears was wanted on a warrant for larceny after he had consumed gas without going through the gas meter. Sergeant Gormley had attempted to serve the warrant on two occasions but was unsuccessful. Mrs. Spears told the officers that her husband was inside the apartment. The officers entered the apartment building and located Spears downstairs from his apartment and read the warrant to him. Spears, not resisting, then asked if he could retrieve his hat and coat from the apartment upstairs before he was arrested. The request was granted and Patrolman Gagler accompanied him to his apartment with gun drawn. Spears suddenly sprinted ahead, running to a chair and retrieved a revolver which was concealed underneath it. Spears turned and fired on Officer Gagler six times. According to a Chicago Daily Tribune article, Spears shouted “Nobody’s going to take me” as he fired at the officer. Officer Gagler was struck in the abdomen, both legs, and twice in the arm with one round missing him. Although seriously wounded, he was able to return fire and struck Spears in the abdomen four times. Hearing the gunfire, Sergeant Gormley and Officer Bergan raced up the stairs and by the time they reached Gagler Spears had fled the scene.

Officer Gagler was rushed to Mercy Hospital. Five fellow officers who had come to the hospital volunteered to give blood for the transfusions Gagler was in desperate need of. Their efforts were in vain as Officer Gagler succumbed to his injuries at 7:55 a.m. the following day on June 19, 1932. Spears, who was also shot, sought help at Cook County Hospital where he was located shortly after Gagler’s death. He was arrested and transferred to the Bridewell Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries at 9:00 p.m. on June 26, 1932.

Officer Gagler was waked at Hursen Funeral Home located at 2346 West Madison Street and he was laid to rest on June 23, 1932 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois. His grave is located in Lot 58 - Row 2, Block 6, Section 17. His grave was relocated from Row 3 to Row 2 on July 8, 1932.

Patrolman William George Gagler, born June 24, 1893, received a Temporary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 5, 1919 prior to his Probationary Appointment to the Department on March 10, 1921. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Gagler was survived by his wife, Lillian and four children.

Patrolman Patrick James Gallagher

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Dec 1917
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4966
Incident Date:
14 Apr 1931
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
41
End of Watch:
14 Apr 1931
Unit of Assignment:
38th District - Town Hall
Date of Birth:
07 Jan 1890
Served:
13 years, 4 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 30
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 45-E: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman Patrick James Gallagher, Star #4966, aged 41 years, was a 13 year, 4 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 38th District - Town Hall.

On April 14, 1931, at approximately 2:00 a.m., Officer Gallagher was on patrol with his partner Patrolman Carl Johnson. They went to the Windsor-Wilson Hotel, located at 915 West Wilson Avenue, in response to a complaint from the night clerk, John Pendrick, that there was a drunken party in progress with excessive disturbance. They proceeded to Room 328 where they met an intoxicated Frederick Guy Sprague, age 59, owner of the Grain Traders Company. Sprague and his friends, two men and two women, were celebrating Sprague's birthday. Sprague promised to send his friends home and quiet down. As the officers left, the noise began again and they returned to knock on the door. According to Officer Johnson, Sprague opened the door and fired two shots, one striking Officer Gallagher in the abdomen. In response, Officer Johnson quickly disarmed Sprague and placed him in custody. Officer Gallagher was transported to Lake View Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries at 2:30 a.m. the same day.

Following his arrest, Guy Sprague retained the services of Attorney Barrett O’Hara. On April 15, 1931, Sprague was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner for murder. Sprague, a retired millionaire grain broker, claimed his pistol went off accidentally. On November 20, 1931, Sprague was found not guilty by a jury in the court of Judge Rush.

Officer Gallagher was waked at his residence located at 1042 West Waveland Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Mary of the Lake Church located at 4200 North Sheridan Road and he was laid to rest on April 17, 1931 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Patrick James Gallagher, born January 7, 1890, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 13, 1917. He was awarded The Chicago Tribune Award for Police Heroes during his career.

Officer Gallagher served in the Armed Forces. He was also a member of the Chicago Police Post No. 207 American Legion and the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. Officer Gallagher was survived by his wife, Ellie (nee Burke) and children: Irene, James, John and Thomas.

Patrolman William Gallagher

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Jul 1921
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1162
Incident Date:
25 Sep 1929
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
41
End of Watch:
25 Sep 1929
Unit of Assignment:
26th District - Desplaines
Date of Birth:
15 Aug 1888
Served:
8 years, 2 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 25
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 35-E: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Gallagher, Star #1162, aged 41 years, was an 8 year, 2 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 26th District - Desplaines.

On September 25, 1929, at 11:45 a.m., Officer Gallagher and his partner, Patrolman Jesse D. Hults along with other officers, were conducting an investigation into a reported kidnapping of Charles Kirkman. Kirkman was the leader of the “Moorish Science Temple,“ a black cult, kidnapped from his residence located at 442 West Elm Street. The organization had been having internal conflicts and this was not the first time it was made public. Claude Green, the international treasurer of the organization, was shot and killed on March 14, 1929 before a meeting. After being kidnapped, Kirkman’s fellow leaders attempted to rescue him before calling for police help. During the course of their investigation, the officers relocated to a hallway outside an apartment at 4139 South Parkway (present day Drexel Boulevard), on the city's south side. When they demanded entry, they were met with a burst of heavy gunfire. Gallagher and Hults were both struck and fell mortally wounded while the other officers returned fire. A fierce gun battle ensued and police were forced to result to sawed off shot guns, revolver and tear gas bombs. The gunmen were dislodged from the apartment by the tear gas bombs and the gunfight moved to the street where over 100 rounds were exchanged as the cult member led the scene. By this time a crowd had gathered to watch as Deason Stephens, who shot Hults, was killed by a member of Patrolman Frank J. Reynolds squad while attempting to escape.

Charles Kirkman and Officer Gallagher died at the scene. Officer Hults was rushed to Mercy Hospital where it was learned that he was shot seven times and determined that there was nothing doctors could do for him. Officer Hults died the following day in the evening of September 26, 1929. Ironically, Hults had said to his superior, Lieutenant Andrew Barry, “Don’t worry Andy. I’ll beat this and be back on the job soon” shortly before he died.

Over 1000 extra policemen were activated and called out to patrol the city’s Southside in an effort to prevent the escalation and further violence into becoming a riot. This precautionary measure by Department command staff proved unnecessary as the areas residents quickly settled down. 60 people were taken into custody after officers took control of the situation. An addition 20 of the organizations associates were also ordered held by Deputy Commissioner Stege after he learned of Hults death. The arrestees were thoroughly questioned in an attempt to learn the root cause of the organizations internal conflict and the names of those involved in the shootout. Detectives soon learned that the Moorish Science Temple was a racket run to make money for its leaders. Deputy Commissioner Stege publicly proclaimed that all of the temple’s costumes’ titles and regalia were deceptive props used to twist the religion of Islam into a ploy to scam innocent believers. The temple’s leaders, whom were interviewed by detectives, admitted to charging several thousand members of the organization 50 cents weekly in dues that mostly went into their own pockets.

On September 26, 1929, Ira Johnson, was identified as the killer of Officer Gallagher. He was held by the Coroner as principal and Eugene Jackson, Moses Jackson, E. Mealey, Compton Johnson and H. M. R. Johnson were held as accessories. All were indicted on two charges each by the October 1929 Grand Jury. On April 18, 1930, Johnson was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet while H.M.R. Johnson and another accomplice received lighter sentences. On April 21, 1930 all other remaining cases, were nolle prossed by Judge Steffen. In total three convictions were made in the Gallagher case.

Officer Gallagher was waked at his residence located at 5723 West Warwick Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Pascal Church located at 3925 North Melvina Avenue and he was laid to rest on September 28, 1929 in All Saints Catholic Cemetery, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Patrolman William Gallagher, born August 15, 1888, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 14, 1921. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $180.00 during his career.

Officer Gallagher was a member of the Chicago Police Post No. 207 American Legion and the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Bessie (nee Hunt); children: Billy, Loraine and Marie; mother, Bridget and siblings: John, Sister Mary Kilian, Michael, Mrs. B. McDonough, Mrs. K. Durkin, Mrs. T. Davis, Nellie and Teresa.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #10026.

Patrolman Melvin Andrew Galloway Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
11 Mar 1965
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
13794
Incident Date:
21 Mar 1971
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
25
End of Watch:
21 Mar 1971
Unit of Assignment:
15th District - Austin
Date of Birth:
16 Oct 1945
Served:
6 years, 0 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
025 - Grand Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Memory Gardens Cemetery - Arlington Heights, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 24
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 24-E: 14

Incident Details:

Patrolman Melvin Andrew Galloway, Jr., Star #13794, aged 25 years, was a 6 year, 0 month, 10 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 15th District - Austin Tactical Unit.

On March 21, 1971, at 1:45 a.m., Officer Galloway and his partners, Sergeant William Alexander, Patrolmen James Ahern and Patrick Crowley were working in plain clothes investigating an alleged prostitution ring inside the Sabre Cocktail Lounge located at 5611 West Grand Avenue. While inside the lounge, Officer Galloway observed Lester Anderson, age 23, of 155 North Central Avenue, staring at him. Galloway approached Anderson and asked "do I offend you?" Anderson replied "No" and as Galloway turned to leave, another man, Amzi Freeman, Jr., age 26, of 5507 West Gladys Avenue, insulted Galloway. A fight broke out between Galloway and Freeman when Freeman attacked the officer. Freeman drew a knife and sliced Galloway on his arms and legs. Officer Ahern stepped in to aide his partner and began to struggle with Anderson. In the course of the struggle Ahern dropped his gun and sustained cuts on his arms and stab wound to the chest by Anderson. The injuries he sustained caused him to callapse. At this time Freeman picked up Ahern's revolver and shot Officer Galloway in the chest. In response, Officer Crowley fired his weapon once striking Freeman in the head, killing him instantly. When the struggle began a 10-1 was called by Officer Crowley. Several other patrons became involved and began to fight with additional police who responded. Officer Ahern was transported to St. Anne's Hospital by beat 1570 and was treated and released. Officer Galloway was also transported to St. Anne's Hospital by beat 1570 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Salagione at 2:00 a.m. on March 21, 1971.

Lester Anderson was arrested and charged with attempted murder and aggravated battery.

Officer Galloway was waked at Northlake Funeral Home located at 140 East North Avenue, Northlake, Illinois, his funeral service was also held at Northlake Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on March 24, 1971 in Memory Gardens Cemetery, 2501 East Euclid Avenue, Arlington Heights, Illinois.

Patrolman Melvin Andrew Galloway, Jr., born October 16, 1945, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 11, 1965. He earned 14 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Galloway served in the U.S. Army from May 1963 thru May 1966 and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Sergeant. He was survived by his ex-wife, Yolanda; child: David E., age 1; father, Melvin Andrew, Sr.; sister, Diane M. Goolsby and step-brothers: Daniel R. and John A. Connell.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #K103592.

Patrolman Robert Lloyd Gallowitch

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Dec 1970
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
15442
Incident Date:
24 May 1972
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
24 May 1972
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Kensington
Date of Birth:
11 Oct 1941
Served:
1 year, 5 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
006 - Gresham

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Evergreen Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 24
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 59-E: 14

Incident Details:

Patrolman Robert Lloyd Gallowitch, Star #15442, aged 30 years, was a 1 year, 5 month, 10 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Kensington.

On May 24, 1972, at 10:00 a.m., Officer Gallowitch was on duty working 10-99 on beat 504. He responded to a burglar alarm call at Wittgren Jewelers located at 8649 South Cottage Grove Avenue with fellow officers. Upon arrival Officer Gallowitch, who was working alone 10-99, went to the rear while Patrolman Kenneth Jacobs and Evidence Technician Paul McGrath, both 10-99, entered the front of the location. Three men, Wilbert Droughns, age 20, Galvan Jackson, age 20 and Frederick C. Lancaster, age 21, were disguised as telephone repairman and in the process of burglarizing the jewelry store. As Officer Gallowitch stepped from his squad car, Lancaster jumped out from the side of the building. Officer Gallowitch went for his revolver and was shot by Lancaster in the abdomen. Officer Gallowitch returned fire and shot Lancaster in the right and left leg. The other officers heard the gunfire and ran to the rear of the location. Lancaster jumped into an Illinois Bell Telephone Company truck and tried to drive off, but was blocked by Officer Gallowitch's squad car. Lancaster then surrendered to Officers Jacobs and McGrath and a .22 caliber pistol was recovered from Lancaster. Officer Gallowitch was transported to Jackson Park Hospital where he underwent surgery. His heart stopped five times and at 2:26 p.m. his heart stopped for a sixth time and surgeons were unable to revive him.

Also apprehended at the scene were Jackson and Droughns. All three men were charged with murder, robbery, unlawful restraint, and conspiracy to commit robbery. Further investigation revealed that the Jewelry store owner called in the alarm after he saw two suspicious men approach the rear of the store in an Illinois Bell Telephone Company truck. The men tried to use the truck as a ruse to cut the telephone lines to the store. The men had just hijacked the truck from George Clark, 20 the driver of the truck. The men handcuffed and blindfolded Clark and then put him in the rear of the panel truck. They then drove to the jewelry store.

Frederick Lancaster later pleaded guilty to Officer Gallowitch’s murder and was sentenced to 20 to 40 years in prison. In 1982, Lancaster filed a two million dollar federal lawsuit against Illinois State Prison Officials. He claimed that prison officials were not giving him needed treatment for his kidney ailment. On July 28, 1982, Lancaster was released from prison by Cook County Judge Daniel Ryan because of his ailment. The Illinois Appellate Court overruled Judge Ryan and remanded Lancaster back to prison two days later. Prior to his release authorities from Joliet Correctional Facility had been transporting Lancaster three times a week to the University of Illinois Medical Center for his five hour dialysis sessions.

Officer Gallowitch was waked at Opyt Funeral Home located at 13350 South Baltimore Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Annunciata Church located at 11128 South Avenue G and he was laid to rest on May 27, 1972 in Evergreen Cemetery, 3401 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Robert Lloyd Gallowitch, born October 11, 1941, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 14, 1970 and was in Recruit Class 70-6D at the O'Brien Street Police Academy.

Officer Gallowitch was survived by his wife, Joan (nee Roma); children: Michelle, age 2 and Robert, age 6; parents: Hilda (nee Kieschnick) and Joseph; brother, Norman and step-sister.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #M195626.

In January, 1973, Officer Gallowitch's star was retired by Superintendent James B. Conlisk and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Gallowitch's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman Bruce Norman Garrison

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Jun 1970
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
14775
Incident Date:
27 Feb 1974
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
28
End of Watch:
27 Feb 1974
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division: Unit 056 - Area 6 Special Operations Group
Date of Birth:
11 Nov 1945
Served:
3 years, 8 months, 12 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
020 - Lincoln

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oakridge Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, lIne 27
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 17-E: 2

Incident Details:

Patrolman Bruce Norman Garrison, Star #14775, aged 28 years, was a 3 year, 8 month, 12 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division: Unit 056 - Area 6 Special Operations Group.

On February 27, 1974, at 8:15 p.m., Patrolmen Bruce Norman Garrison and William Charles Marsek were working the third watch on beat 6653. They were participating in a manhunt for Jacob Paul Cohen, alias Paul Robson, age 30, of 5317 North Wayne, who was wanted for an earlier escape after he was arrested for murder. They observed Cohen emerge from Raven's Pub located at 1818 West Foster Avenue. Cohen walked to his car and then after seeing the officers reentered the tavern. As Officers Garrison and Marsek investigated, they noticed a sawed-off shotgun near the man's car. When the officers entered the tavern looking for Cohen they could not see him because of the poor lighting. As the officers moved further inside, the located Cohen and a struggle ensued. Shots were fired by Cohen. A 10-1 was called and units responded from the 20th District. Officers Garrison and Marsek were both shot in the head and Officer Marsek was also shot in the shoulder and abdomen. Cohen fled out the front door of the tavern and a manhunt ensued. Information was received that Cohen fled in a "beat up" 1964 Rambler, but it was not certain whether he fled in a car or on foot. Police were seen searching the bushes with flashlights in the 5100 block of North Leavitt Avenue and in Winnemac Park. The gunman made good his escape. Officer Garrison's .38 caliber revolver was missing and it was believed that Cohen had gained control of the revolver during the struggle and shot both officers with it. Officers Garrison was transported to Ravenswood Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 8:20 p.m. on February 27, 1974. Officer Marsek was transported to Edgewater Hospital where he was pronounced dead at 8:20 p.m. on February 27, 1974.

Jacob Cohen fled to Wisconsin and had told a close female friend his new address and alias he was using to hide out. That friend quickly passed the information on to another male friend and unwittingly betrayed Cohen's trust. Unbeknownst to the female, the male friend was a close friend with Sergeant Thomas Kelly of the Robbery Unit. Sergeant Kelly then relayed the information to Sergeant Rocco Rinaldi of the Homicide Unit. On March 4, 1974, Sergeant Rinaldi alerted the FBI in Milwaukee. Surveillance was set up on Cohen while the two sergeants sped up to Milwaukee to make the arrest. However, Cohen detected the FBI surveillance and shot his way out of the building wounding Agent Richard Carr. Cohen took refuge in a nearby house and took four children hostage and used one as a shield from bullets while demanding a getaway car. When the child broke free Milwaukee Police and Federal Agents opened fire and Cohen was killed in a hail of gunfire. Cohen sustained 16 gunshot wounds.

Officer Garrison was waked at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home located at 6150 North Cicero Avenue and he was cremated and laid to rest on March 2, 1974 in Oakridge Cemetery, 4301 West Roosevelt Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Bruce Norman Garrison, born November 11, 1945, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 15, 1970. He earned 6 Commendations during his career.

Officer Garrison was a member of the Confederation of Police. He was survived by his ex-wife, Diane Dolores (nee Carr), age 26, children: Brett Allen, age 7 and Michael James, age 4; and mother, Edna L. (nee LeJeune) and sister, Nancy Zemror.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #P083417.

On May 21, 1998, Officer Garrison's star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Garrison's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Lieutenant George Michael Garry

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Dec 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
23 Dec 1924
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
43
End of Watch:
10 Feb 1925
Unit of Assignment:
District 26 - Cragin
Date of Birth:
21 Feb 1881
Served:
17 years, 1 month, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Lieutenant George Michael Garry, Star # Unknown, aged 43 years, was a 17 year, 1 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 26 - Cragin.

On December 23, 1924, at 10:50 p.m., Lieutenant Garry was struck down while on patrol by an unidentified Ford auto. The accident occurred on Crawford Avenue (present day Pulaski Road) 35 feet south of Roosevelt Road. The auto did not stop and the driver was never identified. Lieutenant Garry died from the injuries he sustained 49 days later on February 10, 1925.

On February 18, 1925, the Coroner recommended the arrest of the driver.

Lieutenant Garry was waked at his sister’s residence located at 5042 West Adams Street, his funeral mass was held in Requiem at Resurrection Catholic Church located at 5082 West Jackson Boulevard and he was laid to rest on February 13, 1925 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Lieutenant George Michael Garry, born February 21, 1881, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 23, 1907. He earned 3 Credible Mentions during his career. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915. On June 8, 1921, he was promoted to Sergeant. On August 2, 1924, he was promoted to Lieutenant.

Lieutenant Garry was survived by his sons: John Stephan, age 12 and William George, age 13 and siblings: Alice, Bernard, Daniel, Frank, Martin, Mrs. J. H. Moorhead, Mrs. J. J. Whalen, Mrs. William J. Smith, Neil, Rose E. and Tom

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8040.

Patrolman Andrew Gartley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Mar 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4133
Incident Date:
30 May 1914
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Blunt Trauma
Age:
36
End of Watch:
31 May 1914
Unit of Assignment:
District 26, 44th Precinct - Summerdale
Date of Birth:
02 Mar 1878
Served:
7 years, 2 months, 29 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Montrose Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 58-E: 15

Incident Details:

Patrolman Andrew Gartley, Star #4133, aged 36 years, was a 7 year, 2 month, 29 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the District 26, 44th Precinct - Summerdale.

On May 30, 1914, at 2:30 p.m., Officer Gartley, while on patrol, entered a tavern located at 2581 North Lincoln Avenue. Officer Gartley had entered the tavern to cash his paycheck and as he waited, a fight broke out between five patrons. As Officer Gartley attempted to break up the fight, the combatants suddenly turned on him. Officer Gartley was severely beaten and sustained serious injuries including a broken jaw in the fight. He lapsed into unconsciousness and was rushed to Alexian Brothers Hospital where he lingered, remaining unconscious until his death. He died from a hemorrhage as a result of his injuries at 12:00 a.m. on May 31, 1914.

On June 1, 1914, the Coroner in connection with Gartley’s death held David Kerr, Daniel McNamara and James Shearin to the Grand Jury. On October 28, 1918, all three men were acquitted and their cases stricken off the record by Judge Crowe.

Officer Gartley was waked at his residence located at 829 West Lill Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Montrose Cemetery and he was laid to rest on June 4, 1914 in Montrose Cemetery, 5400 North Pulaski Road, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Andrew Gartley, born March 2, 1878, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 2, 1907.

Officer Gartley was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, Rutledge Camp No. 11347 Modern Woodmen of America and Court Clybourne No. 34 United Order of Foresters. He was survived by his wife, Emily; children: Andrew and Blanche, stepson, Edgar McBride and siblings: Charles, Ed, Elmer, George, John, Margaret Gallop and Mary Lewis.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3668.

Police Officer Conrad Charles Gary

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Mar 2017
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12003
Incident Date:
17 Dec 2018
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Train
Age:
31
End of Watch:
17 Dec 2018
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Calumet
Date of Birth:
21 Aug 1987
Served:
1 year, 9 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Pending Ceremony
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 25
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 35-W: 31

Incident Details:

Police Officer Conrad Charles Gary, Star #12003, aged 31 years, was a 1 year, 9 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District – Calumet. On December 17, 2018, at approximately 6:20 p.m., Officer Gary and his partner, Police Officer Eduardo Marmolejo #10101, were working beat 505. They responded to a ShotSpotter alert of shots fired at 101st Street and Dauphin Avenue. While investigating the shots fired alert the officers encountered Edward R. Brown, aged 24 years, whom had fired the shots detected by ShotSpotter holding a gun. Brown began to flee southbound on Dauphin Avenue and the officers gave chase. The foot pursuit continued up a train embankment located at 103rd Street and Dauphin Avenue where the offender crossed the tracks heading towards Cottage Grove Avenue. Still in pursuit the officers began to cross the tracks. While standing on the southbound tracks, the officers observed a northbound train approaching and waited for it to pass before crossing the tracks. Preoccupied with the foot pursuit, the officers were unaware of an approaching southbound Metra train, No. 119, which had left the Millennium Station at 5:58 pm. Unaware that the southbound train was bearing down on them the officers most likely contributed the sound from it to the passing northbound train. Shortly after the northbound train passed they were struck from behind by the southbound train. It is estimated that the train was traveling at 60-65 miles per hour at the time of the incident. Both officers died on the scene and were both transported to the Cook County Medical Examiner's Office, located at 2121 West Harrison Street, by CFD Ambulance #'s 5 and 60. Brown was apprehended a short while later by other responding officers and placed into custody. Brown's gun was also recovered near the scene where the officers were struck. On December 19, 2018, Brown was charged with Aggravated Unlawful Use of a Weapon and Reckless Discharge of a Firearm - Endangerment. Officer Gary was waked at Blake Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, Oak Lawn, Illinois, his funeral mass was held at St. Rita of Cascia Shrine Chapel located at 7740 South Western Avenue and he was laid to rest on December 21, 2018 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois. Police Officer Conrad Charles Gary, born August 21, 1987, received his Probationary Appointment to the Department on March 16, 2017 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Special Honorable Mention (posthumously), 1 Military Service Award and 3 Honorable Mentions during his career. Officer Gary served in the U.S. Air Force as a Security Force Officer from 2010 to 2015 and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Staff Sergeant. During his military service he earned the Air Force Achievement Medal Meritorious Unit Award, Air Force Good Conduct Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Global War On Terrorism Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Nuclear Deterrence Operations Service Medal with 'N ' Deuce, Overseas Ribbon Long, Air Force Expeditionary Service Ribbon with Gold Border, Air Force Longevity Service, USAF NCO PME Graduate, Training Honor Graduate and the Small Arms Expert Marksmanship Ribbon with I Service Star. He was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Gary was survived by his wife, Kelly (nee Kubil); daughter, Tess aged 6 months; parents: Michael and Kiera and brothers: David and Michael, Jr. Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #JB557558.

On August 13, 2019, Officer Gary's star was retired by Superintendent Eddie T. Johnson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Harry Gaster

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4913
Incident Date:
10 Aug 1924
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
31
End of Watch:
10 Aug 1924
Unit of Assignment:
District 19 - Desplaines
Date of Birth:
17 Mar 1893
Served:
2 years, 2 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 11
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 31-E: 11

Incident Details:

Patrolman Harry Gaster, Star #4913, aged 31 years, was a 2 year, 2 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 19 - Desplaines.

On August 10, 1924, Officer Gaster was off duty and working a second job as a watchman in plain clothes. He was working for “Paddy” Harmon, owner of the Dreamland Dance Hall located at Van Buren and Paulina Streets. The dance hall was located near Officer Gaster’s beat and after several auto thefts, Gaster asked Harmon for the side job at his establishment. Harmon agreed and gave him the job. Officer Gaster arrived for work at 8:00 p.m. and at 9:20 p.m. he noticed some suspicious activity in front of the dance hall. He observed two slender youths, Richard Raymond and August Rice, with dark complexions and black sideburns monkeying with a car as if they were trying to start it. When Gaster walked over to investigate the youths jumped from the car and started running. Officer Gaster shouted, “Hey, you. Come Here!” He then started to chase after them as the two ran under the elevated “L“ railroad structure south of Van Buren Street behind the dance hall. From the darkness one of the youths fired a gun striking Officer Gaster and he fell slumped against the dance hall wall. As Officer Gaster lay against the wall he was able to return fire as the youths fled, striking one of them in the back of the head and then falling unconscious.

Dancers inside the hall heard the gunfire and called police and Frank Harmon, son of the dance hall owner, ran outside to investigate with Patrolman James J. Ivers, who was on duty inside the hall. Harmon and Iver’s placed the wounded officer inside Harmon’s car and rushed him to Cook County Hospital where he died within one hour of arriving without regaining consciousness.

Shortly after midnight, Richard Raymond and August Rice, were taken into custody at Cook County Hospital. The youths had flagged down a taxicab chauffeur, Mark Munn, at Van Buren and Aberdeen Streets. Munn stated that he had been hailed by a drunken youth, Raymond, and requested to drive his injured friend, Rice, to a doctor. Munn took them to Cook County Hospital who then called the Desplaines Station to report the shooting. The boys were taken into custody and Rice was transferred to the Bridewell Hospital. Once there he gave his name as August Geracie and claimed to live in Cincinnati, Ohio. Later on he gave his real name, August Rice, and his address of 5 East Illinois Street. Rice was believed near death by surgeons. The intoxicated boy, Raymond, gave his real name and address of 1142 West Van Buren Street. He made a statement and said that Rice was shot in a quarrel with a woman in a moonshine joint. A third offender, Louis Damico, was later identified, and on August 15, 1924 a message was sent out for his arrest. On August 19, 1924, his arrest was also recommended by the Coroner. It is unknown the fates of the boys or if anyone was ever charged with the murder.

Officer Gaster was waked at his residence located at 1646 North Lincoln Avenue and he was laid to rest in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Patrolman Harry Gaster, born March 17, 1893, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 7, 1922. On August 10, 1924, he was advanced into the grade of 1st Class Patrolman at a salary of $2,000.00 per annum for Meritorious Conduct.

Officer Gaster was survived by his expectant wife and daughter, Jeanette, age 6. Following Officer Gaster's death his wife gave birth.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7472.

Patrolman Thomas P. Geary

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
08 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
01 Dec 1928
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
28
End of Watch:
01 Dec 1928
Unit of Assignment:
38th District - Town Hall
Date of Birth:
12 Dec 1899
Served:
6 years, 5 months, 23 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas P. Geary, Star # Unknown, aged 28 years, was a 6 year, 5 month, 23 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 38th District - Town Hall.

On December 1, 1928, at 2:15 a.m., Officer Geary while off duty, with Patrolman Edwin P. Johnson were inside a speakeasy owned by State Representative Lawrence C. O’Brien, the Wells Smoke Shop, located at 920 North Wells Street. While seated on a stool at the bar next to Officer Johnson and Detective Thomas Hayes nearby, Officer Geary began to argue with the bartender, Henry J. Mullarkey, age 32. The argument was of a trivial nature concerning the relative importance of their respective Irish ancestors. Mullarkey then came from behind the bar, took the gun from Officer Johnson’s back pocket, and shot Geary behind the right ear without any apparent cause. Officer Geary died instantly and slumped over on his bar stool without falling off.

It was at this time Detective Hayes, member of a bureau squad, placed Mullarkey under arrest for the shooting. Back at the district station, Deputy Stege took Hayes, Johnson and Mullarkey into his office. Mullarkey was the first to be questioned. He stated that he wasn’t in the saloon and didn’t know anything about the shooting. While all three men were in the office being questioned by Stege, Officer Johnson began to tell his story. When asked by Stege, “Who were present,” Johnson hesitated. It was at this time Detective Hayes said, “Tell the whole truth, we’ve got to do it,” advising Officer Johnson. Johnson then said, “He, Detective Hayes, Edward Brannigan, a real estate dealer with offices at 77 West Washington Street, Gilbert ‘Ding’ White, who served a year in jail for vote fraud, a taxicab driver, his passenger whose name was not known, and Geary were seated in front of the bar.” Detective Hayes then took over after saying to Mullarkey, “I’m your friend but all your other friends are going to tell the truth. It’s the only way. It would have been better for you if I had knocked you off and I would have done it if I had known Red Geary was dead.”

Detective Hayes then told the rest of the story. Hayes said to Deputy Stege, “Mullarkey went out and got a gallon of wine. We sat there for a time drinking it and eating sandwiches.” He then said, “Brannigan and Geary were kidding Mullarkey about his Irish ancestors. Mullarkey was bragging that his brother Freddie was the second smartest kid ever turned out of St. Dominick’s school. Geary said, ‘Yes, and he’s a bank clerk; he and that young Mulvihill who was so smart at school and is now driving a cab are not as well off as I am and I wasn’t so much at school.’ That’s what must have started Mullarkey. My attention was turned from them for a moment and when I looked around Mullarkey had a gun at Geary’s head and he said, ‘You redheaded …!’ and then he fired. Johnson grappled with him and took the gun away from him and I yelled for nobody to leave the place, but they started running out all the doors. I told Johnson to call the station and then I started after Mullarkey and I got him at the basement door.”

Following the shooting, Officer Johnson and Detective Hayes were suspended pending a full investigation by Commissioner William F. Russell. For several hours after the shooting, there were attempts to cover it up which resulted in an order being issued demoting Captain George DeMar who commanded the district the shooting took place in. He was replaced by Captain Gregory F. Moran and a cleanout of the East Chicago station was also ordered.

Mullarkey admitted that he had a criminal history as a youth in that he had been arrested once for robbery and twice for larceny. In 1919, he was also a policeman, but was discharged from the force by General Superintendent Charles C. Fitzmorris after his criminal background was learned. His name was also on federal records as the owner of the store at 918 North Wells Street which had been closed by a federal injunction on March 8, 1928. A petition was filed before Federal Judge Wilkerson, who authorized the reopening of the establishment. The judges authorization was predicated on the belief that Mullarkey was to use the business for a real estate office. When Mullarkey was arrested, he carried Star #285 of the Chicago Metropolitan Sanitary District Police Department of which he was a member.

On December 8, 1928, Henry Mullarkey was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. On January 9, 1930, Mullarkey was sentenced to the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge J. Sullivan.

Officer Geary was laid to rest on December 4, 1928 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas P. Geary, born December 12, 1899, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 8, 1922.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #9999.

Park Policeman Robert Patrick Gibbons

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
138
Incident Date:
26 Jun 1922
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
34
End of Watch:
26 Jun 1922
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
28 Mar 1888
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 7
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 60-E: 12

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Robert Patrick Gibbons, Star #138, aged 34 years, was a veteran of the Lincoln Park Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On July 26, 1922, Officer Gibbons was on patrol riding his police motorcycle near Fullerton Avenue and Lake Shore Drive in Lincoln Park. Officer Gibbons was traveling at a high rate of speed when he lost control of the motorcycle and crashed. Thrown from the motorcycle, he now lay on the street when, a yellow taxicab was unable to stop in time and ran over Officer Gibbons body. The officer died instantly. Witnesses on scene stated that the crash happened so fast that they could not give an accurate account of the events.

Officer Gibbons was waked at his residence located at 6235 North Glenwood Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Gertrude Church located at 1420 West Granville Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 29, 1922 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Park Policeman Robert P. Gibbons was born on March 28, 1888.

Officer Gibbons was a member of the Prairie Signals Post No. 377 American Legion, Brownson Council No. 1030 Knights of Columbus and the Railway Mall Association. He was survived by his parents: John J. and Marie (nee Holmes) and siblings: James F, May C. and Mrs. Thomas Farrell.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The Lincoln Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park district police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the Lincoln Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman John W. Gibbs

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
20 Feb 1915
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1399
Incident Date:
28 Jul 1917
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
33
End of Watch:
28 Jul 1917
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Squadron
Date of Birth:
29 Apr 1884
Served:
2 years, 5 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman John W. Gibbs, Star #1399, aged 33 years, was a 2 year, 5 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Squadron.

On July 28, 1917, Officer Gibbs was on patrol when his police motorcycle collided with an automobile at the intersection of Chicago and Kedzie Avenues. Frank Lennen of 706 North Troy Street drove the auto. Upon impact, Officer Gibbs was thrown from the motorcycle and traveled forty feet before falling and striking his head on a curb. He sustained a skull fracture upon landing which led to his death the same day.

Officer Gibbs was laid to rest on July 31, 1917 in St. Patrick's Cemetery, 1600-1614 North Court Street, McHenry, Illinois.

Patrolman John W. Gibbs, born April 29, 1884, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 20, 1915.

Officer Gibbs was survived by his parents: Bridget (nee Knox) and John and siblings: Charles W., James and Mary McCabe.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman John Joseph Gilhooley Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Sep 1968
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3502
Incident Date:
13 Nov 1969
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
21
End of Watch:
14 Nov 1969
Unit of Assignment:
2nd District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
27 Nov 1947
Served:
1 year, 2 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 20
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1-W: 11

Incident Details:

Patrolman John Joseph Gilhooley, Jr., Star #3502, aged 21 years, was a 1 year, 2 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 2nd District - Wabash.

On November 13, 1969, at 12:30 a.m., Patrolmen John Joseph Gilhooley and his partner, Patrolman Michael Brady, were working the first watch on beat 226. The two officers were assigned by the Communications Center to investigate a complaint of a man with a gun in front of an abandoned building located at 5801 South Calumet Avenue. They spoke to the complainant, Miss Wesley, inside her apartment and she stated that she observed two men enter the abandoned building directly across the street. Both officers proceeded to investigate the complaint. As the officers entered the gangway of the abandoned building located at 5809 South Calumet Avenue two men, Lance Bell, age 20, of 5809 South Indiana Avenue, member of the Black Panthers, and another unknown male, appeared and fled on foot. The officers gave chase and shouted “Police Officers, Stop!“ While in pursuit and as the officers emerged from the gangway a third man, Spurgeon J. Winters, Jr., age 19, of 5647 South Perry Avenue, member of the Black Panthers, ambushed them and fired a shotgun from a porch below. The officers returned fire but were both struck by the gunfire and collapsed to the ground. Officer Gilhooly was shot four times in the forehead, neck and chest. Meanwhile backup had arrived, Patrolmen R. Thompson and Robert Tracy, beat 270, who then called in a 10-1 “Police Officers Shot.“

Responding to the call of a 10-1 were Patrolman Ronald Comparin, 3rd District, Patrolman Daniel Coffman, 3rd District, Patrolman James Dowd, beat 322, Patrolman Donald Miley, beat 317, Patrolman Philip Prerost, 21st District, Patrolman Frank Gershon Rappaport, beat 320 and Patrolman Jack Stewart, 3rd District. Bell and Winters were observed running down Dr. Martin Luther King Drive by responding units. Officers Rappaport and Prerost gave chase on foot and at 5822 South Dr. Martin Luther King Drive, Winters turned and fired his shotgun striking Officer Rappaport. He collapsed to the ground. Officer Prerost, who was running directly behind Officer Rappaport, was then struck as he attempted to take out Winters and was temporarily incapacitated. After shooting Officer Prerost, Winters then shot Officer Rappaport again in the head as he lay on the ground, delivering the fatal shot.

Officer Brady turned the corner just as Winters delivered the fatal shot to Officer Rappaport and opened fire with Officer Prerost. In the ensuing gun battle Winters was killed and Bell was injured, sustaining two gunshot wounds, one to the right arm and one to the leg. Officer Rappaport was transported to Provident Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Carroll at 3:10 a.m. on November 13, 1969. Officer Gilhooley, now paralyzed from his gunshot wounds, was transported to Billings Hospital where he underwent extensive surgery, he was pronounced dead by Dr. Washburn at 12:32 a.m. on November 14, 1969. Officer Brady sustained a laceration to the right forehead, possible graze wound. Officer Comparin sustained a gunshot to the left arm. Officer Coffman sustained gunshots to the left cheek, neck, left shoulder, right upper arm, left nipple and left palm. Officer Dowd sustained minor flesh wounds to the body. Officer Miley sustained gunshots to the right eye, chest and right arm. Officer Prerost sustained gunshots to the right forearm, hand and right foot big toe. Officer Stewart sustained a fracture of the skull. All were hospitalized and later made full recoveries.

Lance Bell was taken into custody at 5322 South Dr. Martin Luther King Drive attempting to flee the scene. He had sustained two gunshot wounds, one to the right arm and one to the leg, during the shootout. On December 19, 1969, Bell was held to the Grand Jury which returned a True Bill on 14 counts including murder, attempt murder and aggravated battery. On November 15, 1973, Bell entered a plea of guilty to two counts of attempted murder and was sentenced to 6 to 20 years in prison by Judge Richard J. Fitzgerald. Bell also pleaded guilty to three counts of aggravated assault and was sentenced to 3 to 9 years. Both sentences were to be served concurrently. Bell would be eligible for parole in 4 years and 9 months. It was believed that Winters was the gunman who killed both officers.

Officer Gilhooly was waked at Sheehy Funeral Home located at 8243 South Ashland Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Ethelreda Church located at 8724 South Paulina Street and he was laid to rest on November 17, 1969 in Holy Sephulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Worth, Illinois.

Patrolman John Joseph Gilhooley, Jr., born November 27, 1947, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 16, 1968. He earned 4 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Gilhooley served in the U.S. Navy and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Confederation of Police and the Illinois Police Association. Officer Gilhooley was survived by his fiancée; father, John Joseph, Sr. (CPD) and siblings: Francis and Patricia Olson.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #H445751.

The Black Panthers are a racist, radical group that professed the murders of law enforcement officers. Members and former members of the group were responsible for the murders of at least 15 law enforcement officers and the wounding of dozens more across the nation.

Patrolman Vincent A. Gillespie

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Sep 1926
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
29 Nov 1927
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly
Age:
29
End of Watch:
01 Dec 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 2-A - Stanton
Date of Birth:
16 Mar 1898
Served:
1 year, 2 months, 17 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Aurora Township Cemetery - Aurora, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 28-E: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Vincent A. Gillespie, Star # Unknown, aged 29 years, was a 1 year, 2 month, 17 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2-A - Stanton, detailed to Commissioner Michael Hughes' Vice and Gambling Detail.

On November 29, 1927, Officer Gillespie was fatally shot in the back at 36th Street and Indiana Avenue. Officer Gillespie drove his own auto to St. Luke Hospital located on South Michigan Avenue where he died two days later on the morning of December 1, 1927.

The details of the incident were a mystery. Before he died, he had regained consciousness long enough to tell Lieutenant Michael Grady the course of events that led to his stabbing. Officer Gillespie told the Lieutenant that two African Americans had shot him while at 31st Street and Cottage Grove Avenue. However further investigation after his death led to a different story. Gillespie’s wife stepped forward and reported that her husband had called for her before he died. When she went to see him, he told her what really transpired. She reported the facts to Frank J. Loesch, who was in charge of the Coroner’s Grand Jury.

The real story of Officer Gillespie’s murder transpired as follows. According to Mrs. Gillespie, a Detective Sergeant whom he refused to name shot Vincent. The two policemen were at a “resort” located at 36th Street and Indiana Avenue when they had a verbal altercation. Near the end of the quarrel Gillespie tore his police star from his coat and spat at the Detective Sergeant. Gillespie said, “Here, you can take this right to your ‘higher up’ for all I care,” he said referring to the star he had torn off before storming away. According to a witness, the Detective Sergeant then drew his firearm and shot Officer Gillespie as he walked away, striking him in the back.

At the time of the incident, the investigation of the case was the responsibility of the State’s Attorney’s Office. However, due to a major election fraud investigation concerning fraudulent voting, at the time, the State’s Attorney turned the investigation over to the Police Department, which was unable to solve the murder. The Coroner's verdict was that Officer Gillespie’s murder occurred in the discharge of his duty as a police officer. The Coroner recommended the arrest of the unknown Detective Sergeant, for murder. Unfortunately, the Detective Sergeant was never identified and hence never arrested nor prosecuted.

Officer Gillespie was waked at a funeral home located at 113 South St, Louis Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Sorrows Basilica located at 3121 West Jackson Boulevard and he was laid to rest on December 5, 1927 in Aurora Township Cemetery, Wabansia Avenue and Fourth Street, Aurora, Illinois.

Patrolman Vincent A. Gillespie, born March 16, 1898, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 14, 1926.

Officer Gillespie was survived by his wife, Emma (nee Fantar); father, Edward S., Sr. and siblings: Bernard, Francis, John, Joseph, Margaret and the late Edward S., Jr.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8149.

Patrolman Jesse C. Gilman

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Jan 1890
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3953
Incident Date:
24 Dec 1910
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
56
End of Watch:
24 Dec 1910
Unit of Assignment:
District 15, 38th Precinct - East Chicago
Date of Birth:
15 Aug 1854
Served:
20 years, 11 months, 15 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olive Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 39
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 44-E: 14

Incident Details:

Patrolman Jesse C. Gilman, Star #3953, aged 56 years, was a 20 year, 11 month, 15 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 15, 38th Precinct - East Chicago.

On December 23, 1910, Gregori Gracio was fired from his job at the Brooks Laundry Company located at 305 West Indiana Street. In his anger he fired four shots at his boss, Foreman John Simes and Driver R.C. Fehrman while they were loading a wagon in the rear of the laundry plant. Simes identified him before he was able to make good his escape in a waiting wagon. Simes reported the incident to police and an officer was sent to watch Gracio’s house located at 1020 South Johnson Street (present day Peoria Street). Officer Gilman and his partner, Patrolman William Burns were assigned to keep watch for Gracio in the area of the Laundry company in case he returned to attack.

On December 24, 1910, at 6:00 p.m., Officers Gilman and Burns observed Gracio at Ohio and Wells Streets among a crowd of Christmas shoppers standing in the shadows. The officers approached Gracio and began questioning him. As they were questioning him, the man kept both hands in his overcoat pockets. After exchanging only a few words Gracio suddenly fired two shots through his pocket striking Officer Gilman in the side. Officer Gilman was struck in his left femoral artery and collapsed to the ground bleeding profusely. Gracio then turned and fled eastbound on Ontario Street. Unsure if he should attend to his partner or chase Gracio, Officer Burns asked his partner where he was hurt. Officer Gilman said, “I’m done for, Billy get him.”

Officer Burns then took off in pursuit, chasing Gracio several blocks, over a half mile, exchanging gunfire during the pursuit. At Wells Street Gracio turned southbound into an alley between Ontario and Ohio Streets. Officer Burns continued east on Ontario Street and at LaSalle Street caught up with Gracio. Grabbing a hold of Gracio’s overcoat pocket, he couldn’t keep hold and Gracio turned as Officer Burns drew his revolver. Before Officer Burns could draw his weapon, Gracio turned and fired two more rounds at close range. Both shots grazed Officer Burns’ right ear. Gracio then continued running and turned east onto Ohio Street. Officer Burns was in close pursuit but hesitated to fire back because of the large crowds. It was at Rush Street where Gracio turned north into an alley and continued east to Cass Street (present day Wabash Street). He was met at the mouth of the alley where Officer Burns had his revolver drawn and yelled, “Throw up your hands, or I’ll kill you!” In response, Gracio attempted to draw his gun from his pocket one more time. In fear for his life, Officer Burns fired one round. Gracio was struck in the head, the bullet piercing Gracio’s brain.

Ten minutes after the shooting, responding officers discovered Officer Gilman laying on the ground and rushed him to Passavant Hospital. Officer Gilman lingered there for one day, succumbing to his wounds at 4:00 p.m. on December 25, 1910. Gracio was also taken to Passavant Hospital where he died shortly after arriving.

Officer Gilman was waked at his residence located at 844 West Garfield Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at his residence and he was laid to rest on December 27, 1910 in Mount Olive Cemetery, 3800 North Narragansett Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Jesse C. Gilman, born August 15, 1854, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 9, 1890.

Officer Gilman was survived by his wife, Florence and children: Jessie, Mabel and Mrs. Edward Baynes.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2847.

Patrolman Richard Gilmore

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Dec 1969
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
14290
Incident Date:
20 Mar 1971
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
31
End of Watch:
20 Mar 1971
Unit of Assignment:
3rd District - Grand Crossing
Date of Birth:
21 Oct 1939
Served:
1 year, 3 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Unknown Cemetery
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Richard Gilmore, Star #14290, aged 31 years, was a 1 year, 3 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd District - Grand Crossing Tactical Unit.

On March 20, 1971, at 1:00 a.m., Officer Gilmore was off duty and attending a house party at Mr. Arthur King's home located at 8506 South Laflin Street. Shortly before 1:00 a.m. there was a knock at the rear door to the basement. Mrs. Glenda King answered the door and a man dressed in a dark coat asked if a friend of his was inside. Mrs. King let the man inside and told him that nobody by the name he gave her was inside. The man thanked her and turned to leave, but instead opened the door and let three other men inside. One of the men fired a round from a shotgun as they announced a holdup. Another man pulled out a pistol and ordered the people inside, about twenty of them, to lie down on the floor. The man with the shotgun screamed, "If anyone has a gun, i'm going to kill him." Officer Gilmore, who was still seated at the table, drew his service revolver and the man with the shotgun fired at him, hitting him in the neck as Officer Gilmore's wife watched.

Two women guests who were upstairs during the time of the first shotgun blast fled the house and ran to South Justine Avenue. They later said that they saw a small blue car parked with one man inside and jumped inside. The man inside identified himself as "Ike," and told them they could sit inside the car with him. However, once they got inside, the women saw the four men with guns run up to the car and they fled from the car. The men jumped in and as the car drove away fired one shot at the women as they fled down an alley.

It was later determined that the four men who jumped in the car were the armed robbers who had just shot Officer Gilmore. They fled the basement after robbing the occupants and took Officer Gilmore's revolver before fleeing. Officer Gilmore was rushed to Little Company of Mary Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival.

Four of the five men were later identified in a lineup by fifteen of the witnesses. The four men were identified as Isaac Gray, age 32, Tyrone Sawyer, age 24, Robert Smith, age 17 and Ford Ransom, age 30. The men were charged with murder and armed robbery. Isaac Gray surrendered himself to police on March 20, 1971 claiming he had been abducted by the four armed men as he sat in his car at 85th and Justine Streets. Officer Gilmore's revolver was found inside Gray's car and blood stains were found on his clothing. Gray said the men forced him to drive around the South Side and forced him to drop the men off at different locations. Gray then went to the home of Miss Anne Lee Bailey, who stated that Gray came over to her house and left three guns, a .32 and .38 caliber revolver and a .25 caliber automatic on the table. The fifth man was later arrested and identified as Divine Kelly, 19.

Officer Gilmore was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue and he was laid to rest on March 25, 1971.

Patrolman Richard Gilmore, born October 21, 1939, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 1, 1969.

Officer Gilmore was survived by his wife; children: Keli Lyn, age 2, Kevin, age 5, Kimberly, age 6 and Joan, age 2; parents: Daisy and Luther and siblings: Barney, Betty Stafford and Floyd.

Patrolman George Frank Giovannoni

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Apr 1921
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1619
Incident Date:
19 Oct 1929
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
19 Oct 1929
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
18 May 1892
Served:
8 years, 6 months, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Ridge Cemetery - Springfield, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 23-W: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman George Frank Giovannoni, Star #1619, aged 37 years, was an 8 year, 6 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Wabash.

On October 19, 1929, at approximately 10:20 a.m., Officer Giovannoni, was off duty grocery shopping on his regular beat when he witnessed a shooting.

The chain of events began when Mrs. Irene Owens appeared in court at the Wabash Avenue station. She had gone there to swear out a complaint against Carey Love, alias James Love. Mrs. Owens testified that Love had attempted to kill her and a warrant was issued for his arrest to facilitate the investigation of her claims. After appearing in court she returned home to find Love inside her residence waiting. A few minutes later, police received a call from a third party stating that a man was trying to shoot a woman at 49th and Federal Streets.

Patrolmen James J. Best and William Walsh responded to the scene, which was less than two blocks from the police station, arriving in less than a minute. As the officer pulled up in their squad car, they observed Mrs. Owens fleeing from an armed Love. The officers immediately drew their weapons and fired at Love who returned fire. Officer Best was struck. Meanwhile, Officer Giovannoni saw the gunfight taking place, dropped his groceries, drew his weapon and ran to assist the uniformed officers. Officer Best paused to determine the extent of his injuries, Officer Giovannoni took up the pursuit and located the offender hiding in the backyard of 4821 South Federal Street and confronted him. Officer Best and Walsh were right behind him. A gunfight ensued, and Best, Walsh and a third officer, Patrolman Timothy Dwyer, arrived just in time to witness Officer Giovannoni’s fatal exchange of gunfire with Love. At 10:25 a.m., Giovannoni managed to corner Love at the edge of the yard and rather than surrender he continued to fire. Officer Giovannoni sustained four gunshot wounds; one in the jaw, one in the chest and two in the stomach. As he collapsed Giovannoni shot Love in the head killing him. The two fell to the ground and died side by side as Officer’s Best, Walsh and Dwyer watch helplessly. Officer Best later recovered from his gunshot wound.

Officer Giovannoni was waked at Piegare and Alfredo Funeral Home located at 923 South Blue Island Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at Piegare and Alfredo Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on October 23, 1929 in Oak Ridge Cemetery, 1441 Monument, Springfield, Illinois.

Patrolman George Frank Giovannoni, born May 18, 1892, received a Temporary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 5, 1919 prior to his Probationary Appointment to the Department on June 7, 1922.

Officer Giovannoni was a Master Mason and a member of Banner Blue Lodge No. 934 AF&AM. He was survived by his wife, Ada (nee Rossi) and parents: Eisala (nee Gallia) and Peter.

Patrolman William Goeghan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
21 Jun 1905
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
21 Jun 1905
Unit of Assignment:
District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards
Date of Birth:
1870
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Unknown Cemetery
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Goeghan, Star # Unknown, aged 35 years, was veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards.

On June 21, 1905, at 3:00 a.m., Officer Goeghan was on duty and responded to a burglary in progress call. A boy reported to police that three men were at work on the safe in David Schantz's Butcher Shop located at 728 West 47th Street. Six Detectives and two wagon men, one being Officer Goeghan responded to the scene. The wagon stopped a block away from the bakery and the building was quickly surrounded. The Detectives went to the front while the wagon men went to the rear.

The robbers spotted the police detectives in the front and attempted to flee out the rear door. Their attempt to flee was thwarted by the presence of the wagon men and they opened fire on the officers. Officer Goeghan was struck by the first bullet and died instantly. His partner returned fire and was joined by the detectives, who ran to the rear after hearing the gunfire. A foot pursuit ensued all the while the men exchanged gunfire with the police. The chase lasted for three blocks and when the men were near the police station, two of the robbers were shot and the third made good his escape through an alley. The two safe blowers; John O'Hearn, shot in the head, and John Mahoney, shot in his breast, were captured and taken to the hospital.

Patrolman William Goeghan was born in 1870.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Park Policeman Robert R. Golden

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Park District Police Department
Appointed Date:
1947
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
420
Incident Date:
14 Nov 1956
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
14 Nov 1956
Unit of Assignment:
West Section
Date of Birth:
31 Aug 1921
Served:
9 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
Barrington, IL

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Queen of Heaven Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 2
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 41-E: 9

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Robert R. Golden, Star #420, aged 35 years, was a 9 year veteran of the Chicago Park District Police Department, assigned to the West Section.

On November 14, 1956, Officer Golden had just finished his shift at 11:00 p.m. and went to the Bel-Mar Tavern at Higgins Road (IL Route 72) and Bartlett Road in present day Barrington, Illinois to relax as he lived in nearby Carpentersville. Two boys entered the tavern with shotguns and announced a robbery. One of the robbers, the short one, stationed himself by the door. Another one of the robbers vaulted over the bar and snatched $40.00 from the till and then ordered the tavern patrons to move to one side of the circular bar and place their wallets and hands on the bar. As the four patrons obeyed, Officer Golden drew his service revolver, and yelled to the robbers to drop their shot guns, and then ducked behind the bar for cover. As Officer Golden raised his head from behind the bar to see if the robbers had obeyed, the taller robber fired his shotgun. He then scooped up two of the four wallets and fled with his accomplice. They made good their escape in a car. The robbers were described as aged 19 to 22 years old with dark hair, needing haircuts, and wore denim trousers. Officer Golden was shot in the face and died instantly.

On November 17, 1956, on a hunch by Elgin State Policemen, Val Mihalic and Donald James, two men were arrested and a third was detained by the U.S. Navy. The two State Policemen transported the boys to the State Police Station at Irving Park Road and Harlem Avenue, in Chicago, for questioning. The two boys were interrogated for seven hours by Lieutenant William Moffat and Assistant State's Attorney Robert Cooney. Edward Pack, age 19 and his half-brother, Robert Lord, age 18, of Fox River Heights, confessed their roles in the holdup slaying of Officer Golden. The two boys named Robert Brimhall, age 18, as an accomplice who had been inducted into the U.S. Navy hours after the slaying. Pack named Brimhall as the actual slayer. Brimhall was placed under detention at the San Diego Naval Base at the request of Illinois State Police.

Pack said he had been one of two robbers that entered the tavern with shotguns and announced a robbery. During the interrogation he said “I told them, 'Hold up your hands' as he went in the door and then he told Brimhall to go over to the bar and get the money.“ “He saw a man raise his head and part of a hand above the bar and say, Hold it. I'm a cop.' I didn't want to shoot him and I ducked down. I heard the blast of the other shotgun, and I saw the man fall. Brimhall was on his way out the door and I went out right behind him.“ Pack also said that Lord was the driver of the getaway car, and had not been in the tavern. They drove a mile south on Bartlett Road, where they threw out gloves Brimhall and Pack had worn, and the shell from the .16 gauge shotgun Brimhall had carried. Police later found the gloves and a shell at the site. Pack said he and his companions drove around for a while, then went home. Brimhall stayed that night with the brothers, and on Wednesday they drove him to the Navy recruiting station in Elgin, where he was inducted. In their home, police found one shotgun hidden under the mattress of Pack's bed. They recovered the other shotgun from a neighbor who had loaned it to Pack and Lord to go hunting.

Brimhall was returned to Illinois on a Governor's Warrant. On February 21, 1957, all three suspects were convicted of Officer Golden's murder. Brimhall was sentenced to life in prison. Edward Pack was sentenced to 40 years in prison and Robert Lord was sentenced to 14 years in prison.

Officer Golden was waked at Gibbons-Okeefe Funeral Home located at 4245 West Madison Street, his funeral mass was held at Resurrection Missionary Baptist Church located at 7201 South Carpenter Street and he was laid to rest on November 17, 1956 in Queen of Heaven Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Park Policeman Robert R. Golden, born August 31, 1921, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Park District Police Department in 1947.

Officer Golden served in the Armed Forces. He was also a member of the Chicago Police Post No. 207 American Legion, Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, Illinois Police Association, St. Jude Police League and the Carpentersville Veterans of Foreign Wars. Officer Golden was survived by his wife, Patricia Marie (nee Crowley); sons: Daniel, Michael, Patrick and Robert; parents: Katherine Moran and Peter and brothers: John, Martin, Peter and William.

The Chicago Park District Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on December 31, 1957. On January 1, 1958, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Police Department through an intergovernmental agreement. Fallen officers of the Chicago Park District Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

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