LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

Checkerboard Band

Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

  • The results are being filtered by the character: H
1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Park Policeman Robert Haferkamp

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
10 Mar 1930
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly (Accidental)
Age:
27
End of Watch:
10 Mar 1930
Unit of Assignment:
Unit of Assignment Unknown
Date of Birth:
23 Oct 1902
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Irving Park Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Robert Haferkamp, Star # Unknown, aged 27 years, was a veteran of the Lincoln Park Police Department, unit of assignment unknown.

On March 10, 1930, at 3:30 a.m., Officer Haferkamp was on duty and at 2025 North Racine Avenue on the 3rd floor and was shot by Lincoln Park Policeman Leo Horn. It is unknown the exact course of events which led to the tragedy.

On March 10, 1930, Horn was arrested and booked for murder. On March 20, 1930, Horn was exonerated by the Coroner, who pronounced the incident an accident. On March 21, 1930, Horn's case was discharged by Judge Sbarboro.

Officer Haferkamp was waked at a chapel located at 2701 North Clark Street, his funeral mass was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest on March 13, 1930 in Irving Park Cemetery, 7777 West Irving Park Road, Chicago, Illinois.

Park Policeman Robert Haferkamp was born on October 23, 1902.

Officer Haferkamp was a Master Mason and a member of Kelvyn Lodge No. 1075 AF&AM. He was survived by his wife, Emily (nee Manz); children: Dolores, Francis and Marlon; mother, Anna and siblings: Clara Katz, George, Lillie, and Walter.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #10169.

The Lincoln Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park District police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the Lincoln Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Herbert N. Hagberg

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1028
Incident Date:
31 May 1929
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
31 May 1929
Unit of Assignment:
41st District - Rogers Park
Date of Birth:
30 Jun 1896
Served:
6 years, 7 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Memorial Park Cemetery - Skokie, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-12
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 25
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2-W: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman Herbert N. Hagberg, Star #1028, aged 32 years, was a 6 year, 7 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 41st District - Rogers Park.

On May 31, 1929, at 2:10 p.m., Officer Hagberg and his partners, Patrolmen John L. Conley and Joseph J. Murphy, responded to a call of a domestic disturbance at 2431 West Thomas Street. They were given strict orders to quell the disturbance or take the man into custody if he would not calm down. They were to investigate a report that Ferdinand Preuss had shot at his wife in a crazed drunken fit. Pruess was known to the officers as a World War I veteran with expert marksmen skills which were noted on his service record.

As the officers arrived on scene, Officer’s Hagberg and Conley exited the squad car while Officer Murphy kept watch while the two survey the situation. Hagberg and Conley made their way and approached the one and a half story residence. They entered the passageway between the front and rear residences and crept to the rear of the house. Approximately 20 feet into the passageway Officer Conley came to the corner of the house cautiously turned left. He located a window at eye level and after making sure he heard no sounds coming from inside, peered through the window shading his eyes in order to see into the darkened room.

Without warning, Preuss fired a blast thru the window with his pump shotgun. Patrolmen Conley was struck and his body was propelled backwards his arms being thrown back from the blast. As Conley fell to the ground, Officer Hagberg could see a gaping wound in his chest. Officer Hagberg, being close behind Conley, rushed over to rescue him when another shotgun blast was heard. Officer Conley was struck in the face. Moving his hands to his face, he discovered that a portion of his face had been blown off. Frantic, he ran screaming approximately 15 feet before he collapsed to the sidewalk.

Patrolman Murphy, hearing the gunfire rushed to the scene, along with concerned neighbors. As he rounded the corner of the building Pruess opened fire at him and anyone who came near. Officer Murphy was struck by gunfire along with John Chorazak and two other bystanders. Pruess then made good his escape, but not for long.

Pruess fled from the residence three miles to the rail yard of the Chicago and North Western Transportation Company. The next morning, he was discovered on the tracks in front of 4245 West Kinzie Street. His body was decapitated by a train. It was believed by investigators that Pruess took his own life by jumping into the path of a train.

It was later learned that Ferdinand Preuss had also shot his wife. John Chorazek was also killed and Officer Murphy was seriously injured but later recovered. The two other bystanders were also injured and later recovered as well.

Officer Hagberg was waked at a chapel located at 4815 North Robey Street (present day Damen Avenue), his funeral mass was also held in the chapel and he was laid to rest on June 3, 1929 in Memorial Park Cemetery, 9900 Gross Point Road, Skokie, Illinois.

Patrolman Herbert N. Hagberg, born June 30, 1896, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 26, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Hagberg served in the Armed Forces, was a veteran of World War I and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Harold A. Taylor Post No. 47 American Legion. Officer Hagberg was survived by his wife, Margaret (nee Calto); parents: Anna C. (nee Swanson) and Nelson N. and siblings: Colvin, Harriet N. and Henry.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #10135.

Patrolman Samuel Paul Hall

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 May 1955
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5190
Incident Date:
30 Sep 1962
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
01 Oct 1962
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Field Services - Patrol Division: Unit 051 - Area 1 Task Force
Date of Birth:
05 Jul 1928
Served:
7 years, 4 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 18
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 10
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 36-E: 4

Incident Details:

Patrolman Samuel Paul Hall, Star #5190, aged 33 years, was a 7 year, 4 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Field Services - Patrol Division: Unit 051 - Area 1 Task Force.

On September 30, 1962, at 12:40 a.m., Officer Hall and his partner, Patrolman Bishop Pamon, age 33, were working the first watch on Beat # 6110. While driving southbound on Wabash Avenue at 36th Street they heard the sound of a gunshot coming from State Street. Officer Hall drove to the area of 36th Place and State Street where they observed a crowd that had gathered. As they pulled up Officer Hall opened his squad car door and was approached by Alva Perkins, age 55, of 3641 South State Street, as he was attempting to exit the car. At a very close range Perkins produced a blue steel 38 caliber pistol and opened fire. Perkins continuously through the driver's side front windshield. Officer Hall was hit three times, once in the eye, once in the chest penetrating the heart and once in the left hip. Mortally wounded, Officer Hall fell back into the squad car and lie slumped over the steering wheel. Officer Pamon fired one shot, fell out of the squad car, and emptied his service revolver over the hood, fatally wounding Perkins. Officer Hall was transported to Michael Reese Hospital by beat 173 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. G. Galante at 12:55 a.m. on September 30, 1962. Perkins was transported to Michael Reese Hospital by beat 270 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. G. Galante at 12:55 a.m. on September 30, 1962./p>

Later investigation revealed that the incident began when a prostitute lifted a wallet off of her john, Nathaniel Warren, age 45, of 4022 South State Street. The prostitutes pimp, Alva Perkins, began to threaten Warren, when he tried to get the wallet back and fired a shot at Warren, to frighten him off. It was that shot the officers had heard which began their investigation.

The coroner’s inquest, held on October 9, 1962 determined that the fatal shooting of Patrolman Samuel Hall was murder and the verdict on the fatal shooting of his killer was ruled a justifiable homicide.

Officer Hall was waked at Browns Funeral Home, his funeral mass was held at Cosmopolitan Community Church located at 5249 South Wabash Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 6, 1962 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Samuel Paul Hall, born July 5, 1928, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 4, 1955.

Officer Hall was a Master Mason of the 32nd Degree and a member of the Arabic Rite Temple No. 44, Harmony Lodge No. 88 F&AM Prince Hall Affiliate and Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was survived by his wife, Frances; children: Edward, Maureen and Samuel Paul, Jr.; mother, Bessie Lee (nee Chubb) and siblings: Marion H., Murial and Robert.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #A350049 Homicide Case Report and A350110 Robbery Case Report.

On January 5, 1963, Officer Hall's star was retired by Superintendent Orlando W. Wilson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Hall's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman William S. Hallaran

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Jul 1877
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
214
Incident Date:
16 Jul 1887
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
16 Jul 1887
Unit of Assignment:
1st Precinct - Twenty-Second Street Station
Date of Birth:
1851
Served:
9 years, 11 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 21
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-E: 5

Incident Details:

Detective William S. Hallaran, Star #214, aged 37 years, was a 9 year, 11 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st Precinct - Twenty-Second Street Station.

On July 16, 1887, at 7:00 p.m., Detective Hallaran and his partner, Detective Ryan set out after roll call to arrest Michael Lynch on a vagrancy warrant. Lynch was suspected of committing a burglary on July 15, 1892 and fleeing from the police. The Detective’s first went to Lynch’s house located at 28th Street and 5th Avenue (present day Wells Street). On testimony during the Coroner’s Inquest, Lynch’s mother stated that someone came into the house and told Michael Lynch that “Billy” Halloran was outside. Michael Lynch responded by saying, with an oath, that he “would kill Halloran if he came in his way.” Lynch then removed a revolver from his room and left the house. As Lynch left the house from a rear door, Detective Halloran spotted him. Detective Halloran quickly jumped on a passing streetcar, leaving his partner behind, and followed Lynch to 25th Street and Wentworth Avenue.

Detective Hallaran jumped off the streetcar and approached Lynch. As the detective was about to lay his hand on Lynch to arrest him, a child ran between the two men. During this momentary distraction, Lynch recognized the officer to be Detective Halloran and pulled out his .38 caliber bull-dog revolver. He fired at Detective Hallaran, striking him in the neck. The bullet entered from the front and lodged in his spinal column. Detective Hallaran then fell backwards onto the sidewalk as Lynch made good his escape. After hitting the ground, Detective Hallaran rolled over and fell into an areaway ten feet below. This fall paralyzed him from the neck down. Patrolman John McDonald of the Harrison Street Station was riding past in a streetcar at the time and heard the gunfire. He jumped off and was the first officer onscene, discovering Detective Hallaran lying on the ground unconscious.

Detective Hallaran was then transported to the 22nd Street Police Station in a patrol wagon. Once there Doctors Andrews and Steale were summoned and examined him. They reported that the detective’s wounds would prove fatal. Shortly thereafter Detective Hallaran regained consciousness and it was first discovered that he was paralyzed. It was decided that it was too dangerous to attempt to remove the bullet at the police station and Detective Hallaran was then taken to Michael Reese Hospital.

On July 16, 1887, after an extensive manhunt, Lynch was located less than an hour after Detective Lynch was taken to the hospital. He was found hiding at a friend’s house located at No. 2631 Shields Avenue (present day 6 East 103rd Street). The house was surrounded and Sergeant Ptack along with Patrolmen Corcoran, Michael O’Brien and Augustus J. Webber made entry. They located lynch standing at the door to the attic with revolver in hand. Thinking twice about firing, Lynch put down his gun and surrendered without incident. Lynch was brought to the hospital where a still conscious Detective Halloran identified him as the man who had shot him. After being identified, Lynch with a sullen expression on his face readily admitted to firing the shot. Lieutenant John D. Shea, who was present, asked Lynch why he shot the detective. Lynch replied that he had served time because of Halloran and wanted to be left alone. Detective Halloran underwent surgery to remove the bullet and died at 12:25 a.m. on July 17, 1892.

Michael Lynch was tried and convicted of murder. He was sentenced to 35 years hard labor in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. A year later he was found insane, sent to an asylum, and escaped. Lynch remained at large for 34 years. In July 1922, he was arrested for assault with intent to kill and was returned to prison in January of 1923. Michael Lynch died in November 1933.

In 1882, then, Patrolmen Hallaran and Leonard arrested Lynch for burglary. His testimony at the trial helped convict Lynch and send him to prison. During sentencing, Lynch was to receive a ten-year sentence but Officer Leonard spoke up and said that Lynch appeared to be dying from consumption and would hardly live out his sentence. The judge concurred and sentenced Lynch to four years for the burglary. Lynch served his four-year term and was released from prison. Ten months later Lynch would be confronted by Detective Halloran and murder him.

Detective Hallaran was waked at his residence located at No. 8705 Butterfield Street (present day 8705 South Perry Street) and he was laid to rest in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Detective William S. Hallaran, born in 1851, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 18, 1877. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Detective Hallaran was survived by his wife, two children and parents.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #881.

Temporary Detective Bernard “Barney” L. Halperin

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Dec 1935
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7214
Incident Date:
20 Dec 1957
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
49
End of Watch:
20 Dec 1957
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
18 Oct 1908
Served:
22 years, 0 months, 13 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Westlawn Cemetery - Norridge, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 4
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 31-E: 17

Incident Details:

Temporary Detective Bernard ""Barney"" L. Halperin, Star #7214, aged 49 years, was a 22 year, 0 month, 13 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Wabash.

On December 20, 1957, Detective Halperin had recently finished his shift at the Wabash Station at 8:00 a.m. During lunch hour, he was visiting a friend at his drug store located at 4301 South Michigan Avenue. A citizen ran in and told him of an armed robbery that was in progress at Alvin's restaurant located at 116 East 43rd Street. Detective Halperin immediately left and ran to the scene. Two other off duty officers, Detective Walter Johnston of the Wabash Avenue District and Patrolman Young C. Hobson of the Prairie Avenue District, who were nearby also heard about the armed robbery and arrived at the restaurant the same time Halperin did. Detective Halperin secured the front entrance and told the other two officers to cover the rear. Detective Halperin then took aim at the gunman, Thomas E. Gooden, age 32 of Markham, from outside while he was inside robbing and pointing his .22 caliber pump action rifle at some 35 restaurant patrons. Detective Halperin lowered his weapon and did not take a shot, for what was speculated that he feared he might hit one of the patrons by accident. As Gooden backed out of the restaurant's front door he was confronted by Detective Halperin. Halperin shouted "Drop that gun." Gooden responded and said "you better get out of my way," and began shooting. A witness said Halperin could have shot first but he seemed to be looking at all the people standing behind the robber. Detective Halperin was shot in the head, but still managed to wound his assailant. After shooting Halperin, Gooden walked over to Detective Halperin as he lay on the pavement, stood over him, firing several more shots into his body. Gooden, limping, fled down the alley and began shooting at Detective Johnston and Officer Hobson. 300 feet north of the alley entrance, Gooden got into a 1957 Chevrolet automobile that was parked there and started the motor. Gooden then sped down the alley toward the pursuing officers. At this time the two officers had been joined by Patrolmen Harold Carr and Robert Christian, who had heard the gunfire and ran to investigate. All four policemen fired at the oncoming car in which Gooden was laying across the front seat holding one arm up to steer the vehicle. The car hit a telephone pole and stopped, and the policemen fired several more shots into the car and Gooden died at the scene.

The incident started when Gooden entered the restaurant and ordered a meal. After eating part of it, he told a waitress, Mrs. Rebecca Stuart, age 28, he was going out and would return. When he came back he carried the rifle and ordered the 35 patrons and all the employees to stand up and put their wallets on the counter. Gooden then went behind the counter and scooped up the wallets and fired three shots into the cash register when he was unable to open it. He then lined the customers and employees up against a wall and fired a shot before he left.

Detective Halperin was waked at Hartman-Miller Funeral Home located at 2018 West Division Street, his funeral service was conducted by Rabbi Victor Weissburg and he was laid to rest on December 25, 1957 in Westlawn Cemetery, 7801 West Montrose Avenue, Norridge, Illinois.

Temporary Detective Bernard L. Halperin, born October 18, 1908, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 7, 1935. He earned 1 Credible Mention and a Commendation for service beyond the call of duty during his career. Halperin was promoted to Temporary Detective on November 16, 1956. He planned to retire in two years. Detective Halperin and his partner had worked on 200 murder cases, solving a large number of them. He was also the partner of Detective Louis Abbott for many years before Abbott was also slain in the line of duty on March 3, 1947.

Detective Halperin was a member of the Chicago Police Post No. 207 American Legion, Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, and the St. Jude League. He was survived by his wife, Nettie; mother, Tillie Leiberman and brothers: Joseph and Samuel.

Patrolman Nels Hansen

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Dec 1884
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
822
Incident Date:
04 May 1886
Cause of Death:
Explosion - Bomb
Age:
37
End of Watch:
14 Jun 1886
Unit of Assignment:
4th Precinct - Rawson Street Station
Date of Birth:
1849
Served:
1 year, 4 months, 29 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 20
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 17-E: 10

Incident Details:

Patrolman Nels Hansen, Star #822, aged 37 years, was a 1 year, 5 month, 29 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th Precinct - Rawson Street Station.

On May 4, 1886, Officer Nels Hansen was with other officers assigned to disperse protesters near Haymarket Square. A bomb was thrown and exploded amidst the officers. As a result Officer Hansen was badly injured by the bomb blast. The explosion was then followed by an intense gun battle in which Officer Hanson sustained several gunshot wounds. Officer Hanson was treated for his injuries and it was thought that his recovery was progressing well. But after many weeks, his health began to decline and he died six weeks later on June 14, 1886. The official cause of his death was Septicemia, and infection caused by the bullet wounds he received. Officer Hansen was the seventh of eight officers to die in the historic incident.

Eight men were arrested and charged with the officers’ murders. Seven were convicted of murder and sentenced to death. The other one was sentenced to 15 years in prison. On November 11, 1887, four of them were executed by hanging. The day before one of the suspects killed himself in his cell with a smuggled dynamite cap, which he detonated in his mouth. The other three were pardoned by Governor John P. Altgeld in 1893.

Nine police officers died after or were killed during the Haymarket Riot labor dispute. The officers were at the scene of a civil disorder when the rioters opened fire and threw a bomb into the crowd. Seven policemen suffered fatal wounds, two policemen suffered serious injury which would later lead to their death and 70 other people were injured by the explosion and ensuing gunfire.

The officers who were killed in or as a result of the Haymarket Riot, in order of their death, include:

  • Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, End of Watch May 4, 1886
  • Patrolman John J. Barrett, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman George F. Miller, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, End of Watch May 8, 1886
  • Patrolman Michael Sheehan, End of Watch May 9, 1886
  • Patrolman Nels Hansen, End of Watch May 14, 1886
  • Patrolman Thomas Redden, End of Watch May 16, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy O'Sullivan, End of Watch June 14, 1888
  • Patrolman Patrick Hartford, End of Watch November 26, 1897

Officer Hansen was laid to rest on June 16, 1886 in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Nels Hansen, born in 1849, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 15, 1884.

Officer Hansen was survived by his wife and two children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #877 and Case #2743.

In 2003, 117 years after Officer Hansen’s death a gravestone was placed at his grave for the first time. At the time of his death, he was buried in the potter’s field at Rosehill Cemetery and no grave marker was installed leaving his grave unmarked.

On March 2, 2010, Officer Hansen's star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

In response to the tragic events of May 4, 1886 a commemorative nine-foot (2.7 meter) bronze statue of a Chicago policeman was commissioned to honor the sacrifice of the policemen who lost their lives that fateful night. The statue was designed by Frank Batchelder of St. Paul Minnesota in 1889 and sculpted by sculptor Johannes Gelert of New York, New York. The statue's marble pedestal was ordered to have an inscription on it. The inscription is the command that Captain William Ward delivered in the Haymarket just before the bomb was thrown that fateful night: "In the name of the People of Illinois, I command peace." The statue was funded by private funds raised by the Union League Club of Chicago. The statue would become the first known monument erected in the United States honoring policemen. Erected in the middle of Haymarket Square located on Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, the statue was unveiled on May 30, 1889. The unveiling was conducted by Frank Degan, the son of Officer Mathias Degan who was killed in the Haymarket Affair. Over the years the statue would be moved seven times, it would also be repaired and rebuilt several times due to vandalism.

  • Location #1 - Haymarket Square (May 30, 1889 thru July, 1900): Haymarket Square was the first location in which the statue would be erected. It was placed in the middle of Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, as seen in the image above. The statue interfered with the flow of traffic in this busy area, and it became an object of vandalism. As a result, it was moved in 1900 about one mile west, to Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue, near Union Park.

  • Location #2 - Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue (July, 1900 thru 1928): The statue remained at its second location for just over 27 years. A medallion, which is evident in the photo above, is located just above the inscription. Also visible are two white dots just below the inscription. Those two dots are of the original mounting holes for the medallion. It is believed that due to vandalism, the medallion was moved higher up the monuments pedestal. On May 4, 1927, the 41st anniversary of the Haymarket affair, a Chicago Surface Lines streetcar jumped its tracks and crashed into the statue's pedestal. The force of the crash dislodged the statue from the pedestal and the statue fell over falling off the base. The motorman, William Schultz, of the streetcar stated that the brakes failed as he was rounding the corner. He also later said that he was "sick of seeing that policeman with his arm raised." The city restored the statue in 1928 and moved the pedestal and statue into nearby Union Park.

  • Location #3 - Union Park (1928 thru June 2, 1957): The monument was located near Washington Boulevard on the North side of the street facing south and it remained in Union Park for nearly three decades. The finials, which flank the pedestal, had been modified after one of the monument's earlier moves. This change is believed to be the result of vandal damage or from being stripped at various times. During the 1950's, construction of the Kennedy Expressway erased about half of the old, run-down Haymarket Square Area, and on June 2, 1957, the statue was moved to Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway.

  • Location #4 - Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway (June 2, 1957 thru February 5, 1972): The Statue was situated on the north side of Randolph Street a block west of Desplaines Street at 700 West Randolph Street, just to the east of the new Kennedy Expressway. A new platform was built to support the pedestal and statue overlooking the expressway, only 200 feet from its original location. After years of vandalism the pedestal was badly stained and chipped as can be seen in the photo above.

    On May 4, 1968, The Haymarket statue was vandalized with black paint, the 82nd anniversary of the Haymarket affair, following a confrontation between police and demonstrators at a protest against the Vietnam War. The city named the monument a historic landmark in the mid-1960’s, but this did not prevent further vandalism, presumably in protest against police brutality in the context of opposition to the Vietnam War and social inequality in the United States. On October 6, 1969, in what was almost certainly a deliberate symbolic reenactment of the original Haymarket meeting, someone placed a powerful explosive between the legs of the statue, blowing out about a hundred windows nearby and sending chunks of the statue's legs onto the expressway below. Weather Underground members, known as Weatherman, took credit for the blast and battled police elsewhere in the streets of Chicago over several days. The statue was rebuilt and unveiled on May 4, 1970.

    The statue was repaired, but early on the morning of October 5, 1970, it was blown up again. The body of the statue badly bent a nearby railing as it fell before settling on the expressway embankment, and one of the legs landed two hundred feet away. Immediately after the blast, a person or persons called various news outlets to declare that the bombing was the work of the Weathermen. According to one newspaper, the caller said, "We just blew up Haymarket Square Statue for the second year in a row to show our allegiance to our brothers in the New York prisons and our black brothers everywhere. This is another phase of our revolution to overthrow our racist and fascist society. Power to the People." The two attacks on the police statue were among several politically-motivated bombings throughout the country at the time.

An angry and determined Mayor Richard J. Daley had the statue repaired again and put under 24 police protection. On February 5, 1972, the statue was moved to the State Street Chicago Police Headquarters Building. The pedestal remained at this location for 24 more years and was finally removed in 1996. It is unknown whether the pedestal was scrapped or placed into storage by the city.

  • Location #5 - State Street Chicago Police Headquarters (February 5, 1972 thru October 5, 1976): On February 5, 1972, the statue was placed on a new marble pedestal located in the lobby of the State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building at 1121 South State Street. The statue remained on display in the headquarters lobby for four years and eight months. On October 5, 1976, the statue was then relocated to the new Chicago Police Training Academy. The State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building has since been razed and a new commercial and residential complex was built in its place.

  • Location #6 - Chicago Police Training Academy (October 5, 1976 thru June 1, 2007): On October 5, 1976, the statue was moved from the Old Chicago Police Headquarters Building and placed on a new granite pedestal, located in a secure outdoor courtyard at the Chicago Police Training Academy located at 1300 West Jackson Street for twenty years.

  • Location #7 - Michigan Avenue Chicago Police Headquarters (June 1, 2007 thru Present): On June 1, 2007 the statue was rededicated at Chicago Police Headquarters located at 3501 South State Street and placed on a new pedestal. The rededication unveiling was conducted by Geraldine Doceka, Officer Mathias Degan's great-granddaughter. The statue currently resides at this location.

  • Probationary Patrolman Niels L. Hansen

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    Dec 1870
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    Unknown
    Incident Date:
    18 Feb 1871
    Cause of Death:
    Gunfire - Friendly (Accidental)
    Age:
    27
    End of Watch:
    18 Feb 1871
    Unit of Assignment:
    2nd Precinct - West Chicago Avenue Station
    Date of Birth:
    1844
    Served:
    2 months*
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    012 - Near West

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Unknown Cemetery
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # D-9
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 6
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Not Listed
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 17-E: 10

    Incident Details:

    Probationary Patrolman Niels L. Hansen, Star # Unknown, aged 27 years, was a 2 month veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 2nd Precinct - West Chicago Avenue Station.

    On February 18, 1871, at 11:30 p.m., Officer Hansen was leaning against a building at the northeast corner of Chicago Avenue and Noble Street conversing with Officer John Hanratty and a Milwaukee Avenue Car Conductor named Sohle. The two men were standing at a distance of about five feet from Officer Hansen. Hansen was talking about the coldness of the weather and suddenly the report of a pistol was heard quite close by to where the three men were standing. So close in fact, that the flash was observed by Officer Hanratty and Mr. Sohle. Officer Hansen then collapsed to the ground and the two men leaped forward and picked him up. Officer Hansen was dead. Officer Hanratty then ran to the Chicago Avenue Station and made report of the shooting. The news of the affair produced a most profound sensation in the station, and several officers ran to the spot, while others procured a wagon to bring the murdered officer to the station. Mr. Sohle was standing over him, a crowd of anxious citizens around him. He endeavored to staunch the blood that flowed in torrents from the nose and mouth of the dead officer. Their efforts were useless, he being beyond mortal aid. Officer Hansen was taken to the station and laid out upon the floor.

    The eager inquiries of the bystanders could elicit no further information from Mr. Sohle than that he saw the flash of a pistol, heard the report then saw Hansen fall to the ground. Hanratty said that he felt certain that the ball was from Hansen's own pistol, the sound appearing to come from under his clothes. That this is absurd needs no demonstration in the face of the assertions of both witnesses that they saw the flash of the pistol. The policemen then examined the clothing of Officer Hansen in order to find the weapon that it was supposed he carried, but none was found on him, or, as it was afterward ascertained near the scene of the tragedy.

    The officer appeared reluctant to make examination of the body to discover where was the fatal wound, until the Coroner should have viewed the remains. Shortly after 1:00 a.m. the bother of the dead officer, Abraham Hansen, Star #111, who was also a policeman at the Union Street Station, in company with reporters, arrived at the station. An examination of the body showed conclusively that no wounds were to be found. The head was covered with blood, though there where the wound was situated could not be determined.

    It was believed, later, that Officer Hanratty was reaching into his overcoat pocket and accidentally discharged his revolver. The shot struck Patrolman Hansen in the face, killing him instantly.

    Officer John Hanratty denied that the shot was fired from his pistol. He was subsequently charged with murder for refusing to admit that it was an accident or to provide any information. A jury found him not guilty.

    Officer Hansen’s resting place is unknown. His death record was destroyed in the Chicago Fire.

    Patrolman Niels L. Hansen, born in 1844, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in December, 1870.

    Officer Hansen was survived by his wife, two infant daughters and brother, Abraham (CPD).

    Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

    On March 2, 2010, Officer Hansen's star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

    Patrolman James Harrington

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    06 Jul 1894
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    Unknown
    Incident Date:
    04 Dec 1921
    Cause of Death:
    Fall - From Balcony / Over Railing
    Age:
    53
    End of Watch:
    04 Dec 1921
    Unit of Assignment:
    District 17 - Marquette
    Date of Birth:
    21 Jul 1868
    Served:
    27 years, 4 months, 28 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    012 - Near West

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Not Enshrined
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 18
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Not Listed
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Not Listed

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman James Harrington, Star # Unknown, aged 53 years, was a 27 year, 4 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 17 - Marquette.

    On December 4, 1921, at approximately 1:00 a.m., Officer Harrington was on duty attempting to close down a dance that was operating illegally at Emmet Memorial Hall located at 2179 West Ogden Avenue. The event being held was in operation past the allowed time of 10:00 p.m. by city ordinance. While enforcing the city ordinance he was thrown over a railing from the third floor by several men, Eugene Cesaratti, Sittimo Ginnetti, Phillip Ottovo and Attilloi Puscinelli, during a mob action. Officer Harrington fell three floors to the main floor of the dance hall. The injuries from the incident led to his death later that same day.

    Joseph Lucey of 4244 West Ogden, along with two other men, later found Officer Harrington laying on the tile floor of the dance hall. He was arrested and taken to the Detective Division for questioning. John Sullivan was also arrested and brought to the Detective Division for questioning. Both Lucey and Sullivan were later released without charges. On December 6, 1921, Cesaratti, Ginnetti, Ottovo and Puscinelli were arrested and indicted for their parts in the mob action. On February 22, 1922, all four were acquitted of all charges by Judge Fisher.

    Officer Harrington was waked at his residence located at 3047 West Congress, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Sorrows Basilica located at 3121 West Jackson Boulevard and he was laid to rest on December 7, 1921 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

    Patrolman James Harrington, born July 21, 1868, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 6, 1894.

    Officer Harrington was a member of St. Ignatius Court No. 18 Catholic Order of Foresters and the Chicago Policemen’s Benevolent Association. He was survived by his wife, Catherine; children: Catherine, James, Mary and Thomas and siblings: Ellen and Thomas.

    Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7454.

    Evidence Technician Elijah Harris Jr.

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    14 Sep 1970
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    15208
    Incident Date:
    31 Jul 1989
    Cause of Death:
    Gunfire - Enemy
    Age:
    51
    End of Watch:
    16 Nov 1989
    Unit of Assignment:
    6th District - Gresham
    Date of Birth:
    29 Jan 1938
    Served:
    19 years, 2 months, 2 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    006 - Gresham

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Restvale Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # D-8
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 19
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 3, Line 45
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 48-E: 10

    Incident Details:

    Evidence Technician Elijah Harris, Jr., Star #15208, aged 51 years, was a 19 year, 2 month, 2 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 6th District - Gresham.

    On July 31, 1989, at 11:03 p.m., Officer Harris was working 10-99 on the third watch on beat 609. He was writing a parking ticket on an illegally parked vehicle near 1504 West 79th Street when citizen approached him. The citizen reported that he had seen a teen with a gun, riding a white bicycle. Shortly after the report, Officer Harris spotted the offender, Andrew "Mookie" Jordan, age 16, of 8405 South Loomis Street, at 504 West 79th Street and stopped him. Officer Harris placed Jordan against his squad car and began frisking him. While being frisked, Jordan leaned down and removed a .22 caliber handgun from his waistband. Jordan then jumped onto the patrol car and shot the officer in the abdomen. At 11:05 p.m., Officer Harris called a 10-1 over the radio asking for assistance relating that he was shot. Officers rushed to the scene and upon arrival Officer Harris provided them a description and stated that he only knew the offender by the nickname "Mookie". Officer Harris was transported to Christ Hospital by CFD Ambulance #30. He remained a patient there for four months until his death on November 16, 1989 at 5:30 a.m. His condition appeared to be improving until about a week and a half before he passed away being transferred to the hospital's intensive care unit after his condition worsened.

    With the help of eyewitnesses, Jordan was identified and apprehended a half hour later at his home. He was held in Cook County Jail on aggravated battery and attempted murder. Upon Officer Harris’ death, the charges were upgraded and Jordan was charged with 1st degree murder.

    Officer Harris was waked at Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church located at 7956 South Escanaba Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at Tabor Evangelical Lutheran Church and he was laid to rest on November 21, 1989 in Restvale Cemetery, 11700 South Laramie Street, Alsip, Illinois.

    Evidence Technician Elijah (NMN) Harris, Jr., born January 29, 1938, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 14, 1970. He earned 1 Unit Meritorious Award and 29 Honorable Mentions during his career.

    Officer Harris served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1960 thru 1964 and was Honorably Discharged. He was actively serving in the U.S. Army Reserve at the rank of Sergeat. Officer Harris was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his ex-wife, Jeradine (nee Williams), age 43, Regina and Velma; children: Daryl Eugene Peeks, age 23, Regina Lynne Peeks, age 21, Terry Ann latimer, age 26 and Tonya Reolar Harris, age 23; mother, Sarah (nee Philips); siblings: Nathaniel and Regina and grandchildren: Corey, Darnell, LaMar and Teonna.

    Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #M343964.

    On February 6, 1990, Officer Harris' star was retired by Superintendent LeRoy Martin and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Harris' Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

    Patrolman Peter M. Hart Jr.

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    23 Dec 1907
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    1224
    Incident Date:
    20 Jan 1913
    Cause of Death:
    Gunfire - Enemy
    Age:
    31
    End of Watch:
    20 Jan 1913
    Unit of Assignment:
    District 6, 10th Precinct - Hyde Park
    Date of Birth:
    30 Jan 1881
    Served:
    5 years, 0 months, 28 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    001 - Central

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # B-2
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 19
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 1, Line 41
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 40-E: 12

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Peter M. Hart, Jr., Star #1224, aged 31 years, was a 5 year, 0 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 6, 10th Precinct - Hyde Park.

    On January 20, 1913, police received information from Michael Angelo Casella that Robert Webb telephoned his wife’s sister, Belle Hastings, at his apartment located at 1617 South Wabash Avenue, 3rd floor rear. Casella had harbored Webb while knowing of his crimes and that he was wanted for murder, a crime that Casella had witnessed. Webb was the chauffeur and member of the notorious Perry Auto Gang. He had been in police custody three times, escaping each time, in the previous eleven days leading up to this incident. Casella told police that Webb would be stopping by sometime in the afternoon. Acting on the information, Captain Patrick Lavin assigned five plain clothes officers, Officer Hart among them, to go to the apartment with Casella. The officers arrived at the apartment at 1:00 p.m. and arrested Mrs. Hastings. Two of the officers made the decision to transport the women to the Hyde Park Station and leave the three other officers to wait for Webb. Two of the officers, of which remained, decided that they would go and visit a garage operated by Frank Madia at 1612 South Michigan Avenue. Madia was a known accomplice of Webb’s and was also known to have relations with Mrs. Hastings. His garage was located across the alley from the apartment. The two officer left the apartment, leaving Officer Hart alone with Casella to wait for Webb to arrive.

    At 2:30 p.m., Webb arrived and knocked on the door. Casella went to the door and saw that it was Webb. He turned to Officer Hart and said, “There, that is your man.” Officer Hart opened the door and grabbed Webb by the arm and pulled him into the apartment. Webb did not resist initially and asked Officer Hart what he wanted with him. Officer Hart replied, “You just come in here. You are under arrest.” At this point Officer Hart held his revolver in his left hand against Webb’s chest and commanded him to hold up his hands. The two men were now backed into a corner and Officer Hart began patting him down with his right hand. Officer Hart felt a gun in Webb’s right hand hip pocket. He then laid down his revolver on a table to his left and attempted to remove the gun from Webb’s pocket. Unfortunately he did not have a chance as Webb began to fight. Webb leapt forward in an attempt to grab Officer Hart’s revolver from the table and as the men struggled the gun was knocked off of the table. Both of them went down to the floor, struggling over the weapon. While Officer Hart was on top of Webb, he gained control of Hart’s gun and at the same time had his gun in the other hand. He fired one shot, which missed and went into the wall. Webb fired a second shot and struck Officer Hart fatally wounding him.

    Hearing the two gunshots coming from the apartment, the two officers, now across the alley, rushed back to the apartment. Webb fled the scene through and enclosed stairwell leading to the roof and made good his escape. The officers raced up the stairs and found Officer Hart laying dead on the floor and Mr. Casella still in the apartment. Responding officers soon discovered the door leading to the roof. They all went to the roof and looked around for a little bit before one of the officers took note of Webb’s footprints left in the fresh snow. The tracks help police trace his escape route. Webb had slipped back inside the building through a skylight. He was able to gain access to a back stairwell which took him down to the street.

    Casella was taken into custody and transported to the Station for questioning. During questioning, Casella claimed he had never see Webb before yesterday. He also claimed to know nothing about the intimacy between his sister-in-law and Webb. Police recovered a suitcase from the apartment belong to Webb. When asked, Casella denied knowing that Webb had visited his apartment before and claimed he knew nothing about the suitcase. Mrs. Hastings claimed that she asked her sister if she could leave the suitcase in the apartment until she could carry it to their mother’s house. Mrs. Hastings claimed that the suitcase contained Webb’s dirt laundry. However, that statement was incorrect as police recovered the suitcase filled with silverware, silk kimonos, table linen and women’s underwear. All of the items recovered had been reported stolen several weeks prior from 1819 South State Street by the same Auto Gang.

    Mrs. Casella was also interviewed after the incident and stated that she had only seen Webb three times. The first time was on Friday, January 17th when Webb had called and left a suitcase in which he said belonged to her sister. The second time was on Sunday, January 19th when Webb came and asked for the suitcase back. She stated that she didn’t give him the suitcase because her sister had told her it belonged to her by this point. The third time was Monday, January 20th when Webb knocked on the door and her sister answered. Her sister invited Webb inside. Mrs. Casella got the two beers and as she read the newspaper, came across an article that named Frank Madia as suspected of running a fence for the auto gang. When she read it aloud, her sister dismissed it as speculation. Mrs. Casella knew that Madia was her sister’s sweetheart and thought this to be strange. She also noted that Webb looked suspect after hearing the news. Just then there was a knock at the door. It was two policemen looking for Webb. The men said they were looking for a specific room number. Mrs. Casella told them that there was no room numbers on the third floor and went back into the room. When she went back into the room, she found Webb moving a piano away from a closet door. She said to him, “What’s the matter with you? Have you done something?” Webb stopped moving the piano and went into a bedroom. Webb remained there until the two officers left the doorway. Shortly thereafter the officers returned and arrested Mrs. Hastings. It was at this point that Mrs. Casella watched them take her sister down the street and when she went back into her room, Webb was gone. Mrs. Casella then left the apartment to watch a picture show. Shortly thereafter she left, Officer Hart arrived with her husband, Mr. Casella.

    Police caught a break when they arrested James A. Perry, a member of the auto gang. Perry gave a twenty-page confession giving up his accomplices and the location of Webb. Perry listed each of the gang’s exploits including a running gun battle with police and the shooting and stabbing of Patrolman Fred Sticken during a traffic stop. On February 13, 1913, Robert Webb was located and arrested. On July 31, 1913, Webb was sentenced to life in Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Kersten. On July 16, 1925, he escaped from the prison’s farm. Webb returned to the same neighborhood in Chicago to continue his life of crime. On September 4, 1925, he was once again arrested and returned to the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Over the years he filed for parole several times but was denied each time.

    Officer Hart was waked at his residence located at 2915 South Parnell Avenue and he was laid to rest on January 23, 1913 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

    Patrolman Peter M. Hart, Jr., born January 30, 1881, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 23, 1907.

    Officer Hart was survived by his parents: Mary (nee Murry) and Peter M., Sr. (CFD) and siblings: Albert (CFD), Else, Joseph and Mrs. Anna L. Trippen.

    Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3793.

    Patrolman Patrick Hartford

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    15 Dec 1884
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    Unknown
    Incident Date:
    04 May 1886
    Cause of Death:
    Illness - Other
    Age:
    47
    End of Watch:
    26 Nov 1897
    Unit of Assignment:
    District 10, 27th Precinct - Desplaines
    Date of Birth:
    1850
    Served:
    12 years, 11 months, 19 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    012 - Near West

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    St. Boniface Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Not Enshrined
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Not Listed
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Not Listed
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Not Listed

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Patrick Hartford, Star # Unknown, aged 47 years, was a 12 year, 11 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 10, 27th Precinct - Desplaines.

    On May 4, 1886, Officer Hartford was with other officers assigned to disperse protesters near Haymarket Square. Under the command of Lieutenant Bowler, he was stationed in the front platoon of the third company and the fifth man in the first rank. During the protest a bomb was thrown and exploded amidst the officers. Officer Hartford was struck by bomb shrapnel in the right ankle and left foot which led to the loss of three toes. He was also shot during the ensuing gunfire in the right leg and left thigh. After he was treated for his injuries and recovered sufficiently, he was placed on the Disability Pension Roll (DPR) and assigned as a Watchman at the Desplaines Street Patrol Barns. His wounds never fully healed, and it caused him much annoyance and illness up to the time of his death. Several weeks prior to his death, he became ill and was taken to the County Hospital where he would pass away on November 26, 1897. Officer Hartford became the ninth and final officer to die as a result of the Haymarket Tragedy. The cause of his death was listed as enlargement of the liver.

    Eight men were arrested and charged with the officer’s murders. Seven were convicted of murder and sentenced to death. The other one was sentenced to 15 years in prison. On November 11, 1887, four of them were executed by hanging. The day before one of the suspects killed himself in his cell with a smuggled dynamite cap, which he detonated in his mouth. The other three were pardoned by Governor John P. Altgeld in 1893.

    Nine police officers died after or were killed during the Haymarket Riot labor dispute. The officers were at the scene of a civil disorder when the rioters opened fire and threw a bomb into the crowd. Seven policemen suffered fatal wounds, two policemen suffered serious injury which would later lead to their death and 70 other people were injured by the explosion and ensuing gunfire.

    The officers who were killed in or as a result of the Haymarket Riot, in order of their death, include:

    • Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, End of Watch May 4, 1886
    • Patrolman John J. Barrett, End of Watch May 6, 1886
    • Patrolman George F. Miller, End of Watch May 6, 1886
    • Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, End of Watch May 8, 1886
    • Patrolman Michael Sheehan, End of Watch May 9, 1886
    • Patrolman Nels Hansen, End of Watch May 14, 1886
    • Patrolman Thomas Redden, End of Watch May 16, 1886
    • Patrolman Timothy O'Sullivan, End of Watch June 14, 1888
    • Patrolman Patrick Hartford, End of Watch November 26, 1897

    Officer Hartford was waked at his brothers residence located at No. 20 North Ashland Avenue (present day 219 North Ashland Avenue), his funeral mass was held at St. Columbkills Church and he was laid to rest on November 28, 1897 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

    Patrolman Patrick Hartford, born in 1850, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 15, 1884.

    Officer Hartford served in the Armed Forces, was a veteran of the Civil War and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his parents: Elizabeth and Thomas; siblings: Retired Patrolman James Hartford (CPD), Sergeant John Hartford (CPD), Mary Connors, Thomas W. Officer Hartford was preceded in death by his wife, Mary Ann (Nee McGurs).

    Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

    In response to the tragic events of May 4, 1886 a commemorative nine-foot (2.7 meter) bronze statue of a Chicago policeman was commissioned to honor the sacrifice of the policemen who lost their lives that fateful night. The statue was designed by Frank Batchelder of St. Paul Minnesota in 1889 and sculpted by sculptor Johannes Gelert of New York, New York. The statue's marble pedestal was ordered to have an inscription on it. The inscription is the command that Captain William Ward delivered in the Haymarket just before the bomb was thrown that fateful night: “In the name of the People of Illinois, I command peace.“ The statue was funded by private funds raised by the Union League Club of Chicago. The statue would become the first known monument erected in the United States honoring policemen. Erected in the middle of Haymarket Square located on Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, the statue was unveiled on May 30, 1889. The unveiling was conducted by Frank Degan, the son of Officer Mathias Degan who was killed in the Haymarket Affair. Over the years the statue would be moved seven times, it would also be repaired and rebuilt several times due to vandalism.

    • Location #1 - Haymarket Square (May 30, 1889 thru July, 1900): Haymarket Square was the first location in which the statue would be erected. It was placed in the middle of Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, as seen in the image above. The statue interfered with the flow of traffic in this busy area, and it became an object of vandalism. As a result, it was moved in 1900 about one mile west, to Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue, near Union Park.

    • Location #2 - Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue (July, 1900 thru 1928): The statue remained at its second location for just over 27 years. A medallion, which is evident in the photo above, is located just above the inscription. Also visible are two white dots just below the inscription. Those two dots are of the original mounting holes for the medallion. It is believed that due to vandalism, the medallion was moved higher up the monuments pedestal. On May 4, 1927, the 41st anniversary of the Haymarket affair, a Chicago Surface Lines streetcar jumped its tracks and crashed into the statue's pedestal. The force of the crash dislodged the statue from the pedestal and the statue fell over falling off the base. The motorman, William Schultz, of the streetcar stated that the brakes failed as he was rounding the corner. He also later said that he was “sick of seeing that policeman with his arm raised.“ The city restored the statue in 1928 and moved the pedestal and statue into nearby Union Park.

    • Location #3 - Union Park (1928 thru June 2, 1957): The monument was located near Washington Boulevard on the North side of the street facing south and it remained in Union Park for nearly three decades. The finials, which flank the pedestal, had been modified after one of the monument's earlier moves. This change is believed to be the result of vandal damage or from being stripped at various times. During the 1950's, construction of the Kennedy Expressway erased about half of the old, run-down Haymarket Square Area, and on June 2, 1957, the statue was moved to Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway.

    • Location #4 - Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway (June 2, 1957 thru February 5, 1972): The Statue was situated on the north side of Randolph Street a block west of Desplaines Street at 700 West Randolph Street, just to the east of the new Kennedy Expressway. A new platform was built to support the pedestal and statue overlooking the expressway, only 200 feet from its original location. After years of vandalism the pedestal was badly stained and chipped as can be seen in the photo above.

      On May 4, 1968, The Haymarket statue was vandalized with black paint, the 82nd anniversary of the Haymarket affair, following a confrontation between police and demonstrators at a protest against the Vietnam War. The city named the monument a historic landmark in the mid-1960’s, but this did not prevent further vandalism, presumably in protest against police brutality in the context of opposition to the Vietnam War and social inequality in the United States. On October 6, 1969, in what was almost certainly a deliberate symbolic reenactment of the original Haymarket meeting, someone placed a powerful explosive between the legs of the statue, blowing out about a hundred windows nearby and sending chunks of the statue's legs onto the expressway below. Weather Underground members, known as Weatherman, took credit for the blast and battled police elsewhere in the streets of Chicago over several days. The statue was rebuilt and unveiled on May 4, 1970.

      The statue was repaired, but early on the morning of October 5, 1970, it was blown up again. The body of the statue badly bent a nearby railing as it fell before settling on the expressway embankment, and one of the legs landed two hundred feet away. Immediately after the blast, a person or persons called various news outlets to declare that the bombing was the work of the Weathermen. According to one newspaper, the caller said, “We just blew up Haymarket Square Statue for the second year in a row to show our allegiance to our brothers in the New York prisons and our black brothers everywhere. This is another phase of our revolution to overthrow our racist and fascist society. Power to the People.“ The two attacks on the police statue were among several politically-motivated bombings throughout the country at the time.

      An angry and determined Mayor Richard J. Daley had the statue repaired again and put under 24 police protection. On February 5, 1972, the statue was moved to the State Street Chicago Police Headquarters Building. The pedestal remained at this location for 24 more years and was finally removed in 1996. It is unknown whether the pedestal was scrapped or placed into storage by the city.

    • Location #5 - State Street Chicago Police Headquarters (February 5, 1972 thru October 5, 1976): On February 5, 1972, the statue was placed on a new marble pedestal located in the lobby of the State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building at 1121 South State Street. The statue remained on display in the headquarters lobby for four years and eight months. On October 5, 1976, the statue was then relocated to the new Chicago Police Training Academy. The State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building has since been razed and a new commercial and residential complex was built in its place.

    • Location #6 - Chicago Police Training Academy (October 5, 1976 thru June 1, 2007): On October 5, 1976, the statue was moved from the Old Chicago Police Headquarters Building and placed on a new granite pedestal, located in a secure outdoor courtyard at the Chicago Police Training Academy located at 1300 West Jackson Street for twenty years.

    • Location #7 - Michigan Avenue Chicago Police Headquarters (June 1, 2007 thru Present): On June 1, 2007 the statue was rededicated at Chicago Police Headquarters located at 3501 South State Street and placed on a new pedestal. The rededication unveiling was conducted by Geraldine Doceka, Officer Mathias Degan's great-granddaughter. The statue currently resides at this location.

    Patrolman Lawrence Curtis Hartnett Jr.

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    16 Apr 1919
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    3044
    Incident Date:
    27 Oct 1923
    Cause of Death:
    Gunfire - Enemy
    Age:
    28
    End of Watch:
    27 Oct 1923
    Unit of Assignment:
    District 16 - Maxwell
    Date of Birth:
    17 Jan 1895
    Served:
    4 years, 6 months, 11 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    012 - Near West

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # B-7
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 18
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 2, Line 9
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 21-E: 25

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Lawrence Curtis Hartnett, Jr., Star #3044, aged 28 years, was a 4 year, 6 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 16 - Maxwell.

    On October 27, 1923, Officer Harnett, Sergeant Stephen J. Barry and Patrolman F. Fuerst had received a tip that there was an illegal bootlegging operation inside an Italian grocery store. The policemen were not unfamiliar with the store, as it had been raided several times in the past. The officers went to the store located at 914 West Polk Street. The store was owned by the Montana family, who lived in the apartment above, and was being used as a front for a moonshine plant.

    At 2:55 p.m., just outside the store, the officers discussed their plan of attack. Sergeant Barry and Officer Fuerst would go in through the front door. Officer Hartnett was to run down the alley next to the store and climb the fence, so he could be ready to stop anyone from fleeing through the rear. They parted and as Barry and Fuerst stepped over the threshold to the store, someone in back caught sight of them. The store was deserted, the selves only having a few canned goods on them and a flour bin left open. Next to the curtained door that led to the back room was a dilapidated coffee grinder. As the officers peered through the curtain they observed a man pouring the contents of two bottles into a sink. They drew their guns and rushed in, Barry ordering the man to “Cut that out! Leave those bottles alone.” At that moment the matriarch of the family, Madelina Montana, stepped forward and blocked their path. With a belligerent attitude she asked what the officers wanted. They told here why they were there and she demanded to see a search warrant. Sergeant Barry shook his head and that’s when she ran to the kitchen and grabbed a pot of boiling water and threw it at the officers.

    Almost instantly, Joseph Montana, Jr., age 17, entered the kitchen from the back yard and brandished a revolver in his right hand. Sergeant Barry commanded him to put down the gun saying, “Don’t be funny. We’re only looking for evidence of bootlegging, and here your trying to make things serious.” With the officers revolvers pointed at the boy, he lowered the revolver. Regrettably, the officers made no effort to secure the boys gun. The officer then walked across the kitchen to examine the contents of a bottle. At this point, Sergeant Barry ordered Officer Fuerst to go outside and see what was keeping Officer Hartnett. No sooner had Officer Fuerst stepped outside, Joe, Sr. and his wife attacked Sergeant Barry. The two picked up pokers from the stove, Joe, Sr. picking up a flat iron. At the same time Joe, Jr. fired the gun, the first bullet hitting his grandfather in the arm and the second striking Sergeant Barry in the abdomen. Hearing the commotion, Officer Hartnett rushed in through the back door when Joe, Jr. fired again and was hit. Hartnett stumbled a few feet before collapsing. Joe, Jr. then fled the scene on foot, vanishing.

    Despite being shot, Sergeant Barry managed to reach the sidewalk and flagged down a passing auto. The driver transported Harnett to Cook County Hospital. Once there surgeons opted not to operate as they believed he had a good chance to recover. Officer Barry died at the scene and Sergeant Barry eventually recovered.

    An all points bulletin was issued after the shooting calling for the immediate apprehension of Joseph Montana, Jr. and his father. The Detective Bureau flooded the Italian quarter with policemen and a manhunt was initiated. The entire district was searched and officers were able to locate and recover a jug of wine, several cans of alcohol and sixty bottles of moonshine from the apartment above the grocery store.

    Joseph Montana, Jr., was arrested the following day and charged with murder. He was held to the November Grand Jury where he was indicted together with Joseph, Sr., Madeline, John, Jr., age 13, John, Sr., age 65, and Rosina who were charged with assault with the intent to kill. On April 24, 1924, the entire Montana family was acquitted in a bench trial of all charges.

    Officer Harnett was waked at his residence located at 4753 West Jackson Boulevard, his funeral mass was held at Resurrection Catholic Church located at 5082 West Jackson Boulevard. He was laid to rest on October 30, 1923 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois. His grave is located in Gr. 6, Lot 24, Block 4, Section N.

    Patrolman Lawrence Curtis Hartnett, Jr., born on January 17, 1895, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 16, 1919.

    Officer Harnett was a member of Carroll Council No. 761 Knights of Columbus and a 4th degree member of De La Salle Assembly. He was survived by his wife, Alice (nee Miles), daughters: Catherine Ann and Lorraine and siblings: Margaret and Mrs. T. J. Carmody.

    Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7466.

    Patrolman Joseph P. Hastings

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    29 Dec 1930
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    6384
    Incident Date:
    14 Aug 1933
    Cause of Death:
    Gunfire - Enemy
    Age:
    36
    End of Watch:
    14 Aug 1933
    Unit of Assignment:
    35th District - East Chicago
    Date of Birth:
    15 Jun 1897
    Served:
    2 years, 7 months, 16 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    018 - Near North

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # C-4
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 18
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 2, Line 35
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 23-E: 6

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Joseph P. Hastings, Star #6384, aged 36 years, was a 2 year, 7 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 35th District - East Chicago.

    On August 14, 1933, Officer Hastings was on patrol conducting routine checks on various businesses, on his beat, at Navy Pier located at 600 East Grand Avenue. At the same time in The Office of the Bureau of Streets, which was being used by the Illinois Emergency Relief Commission as a pay station to pay workers on the pier, a robbery was taking place. Two gunmen, Morris Cohen and Hymie Sinnenberg, burst into the office with guns drawn. The office was crowded with 50 employees of the Commission’s "make work" division. The 50 men were left unemployed and destitute by the Great Depression and relied on the commission for work. The men had been in line waiting to receive their pay as Thomas Turner, Paymaster, was getting ready to disperse the checks. Also working in the officer were six city clerks and Thomas B. Rawls, a Currency Exchange official who would cash the payroll checks. A Bureau Clerk, James Harnett, saw what was taking place and grabbed the phone in an attempt to call for help as the gunmen advanced on Rawls. One of the gunmen saw Hartnett grab the phone and fired a round at him, missing his head by only an inch. The gunmen then seized the cash box from Rawls, which contained $600.00 and some loose change. Officer Hastings, on patrol, heard the gunfire come from the office and went to investigate. The bandits then ordered everyone in the office to lie on the floor. As they waited for everyone to comply, Officer Hastings arrived on scene.

    The following statement of events was given by Bureau Clerk Charles Eddy. Officer Hastings entered the office and seemed to only notice the gunman who was rifling through the cash box. Officer Hastings drew his weapon and aimed it at the robber, but before he could do anything else was fired upon by the second gunmen. Hastings was struck and fell to the floor, not before he fired twice and then lost his strength. The gunmen then grabbed the Officer’s revolver, went to the front of the office firing one more time before they fled the scene with the cash box.

    As the robbers fled the scene, they dropped one of their guns. That gun was picked up by George Stumpf, who fired at the backs of the robbers as they fled, emptying the gun. At the same time, several of the men in the office picked up Officer Hastings and loaded him into a vehicle and rushed him to Henrotin Hospital. Officer Hastings was pronounced dead from a gunshot wound. The bullet had nicked his star, entered his chest, passing through the heart before exiting his back.

    A manhunt for the gunman was initiated and it wasn’t long before Morris Cohen was found in the Ambassador Garage at 1350 North Clark Street. Cohen had been shot and was found bleeding. Denying his part in the crime, he eventually confessed to planning the holdup and enlisting the help of an accomplice whose name he did not know. After being shown a photo spread of men, he identified Hymie Sinnenberg, who was also identified by other witnesses. Sinnenberg’s arrest was recommended by the Coroner, but he would evade capture disappearing along with the $600.00 plus in proceeds. Morris Cohen stood trial and was found guilty. On August 23, 1933, Cohen was sentenced to death for his part in the robbery and murder. On October 13, 1933, Cohen was executed in the electric chair at Cook County Jail.

    Officer Hastings was waked at his sisters residence located at 6114 West 43rd Place, his funeral mass was held in Requiem at St. Gabriel Church located at 4522 South Wallace Street and he was laid to rest on August 17, 1933 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

    Patrolman Joseph P. Hastings, born June 15, 1897, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 29, 1930.

    Officer Hastings was survived by his wife, Mary (nee McGrath) and siblings: Agnes Oliphant, Ann O’Malley, Catherine Ambrose, Helen O’Malley, James and Margaret O’Hearn. The couple had only been married for four months at the time of Hastings death.

    Patrolman Gregory Allen Hauser

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    02 Mar 1970
    Death Classification:
    Does Not Apply
    Star #:
    14680
    Incident Date:
    13 May 1990
    Cause of Death:
    Age:
    43
    End of Watch:
    13 May 1990
    Unit of Assignment:
    25th District - Grand Central
    Date of Birth:
    21 Feb 1947
    Served:
    20 years, 2 months, 11 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Elmwood Park Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # D-8
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 19
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 3, Line 45
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 19-W: 14

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Gregory Allen Hauser, Star #14680, aged 47 years, was a 20 year, 2 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to 25th District - Grand Central.

    On May 13, 1990, at 9:10 p.m., Patrolman Gregory A. Hauser and his partner, Patrolman Raymond C. Kilroy, were working the third watch on beat 2523. They were dispatched to 2158 North Nordica Avenue, the home of Florence C. Zuniga, for a domestic disturbance that involved her grandson, Ramon Samuel Chavez, age 23. Upon arrival the officers entered the home and interviewed Ms. Zuniga in her living room. After speaking to Ms. Zuniga, the officers radioed in for a transport, because the officer were going to arrest Chavez. Beat 2572, Patrolmen Thomas Bugajski and Bruce Pearson were assigned. Officers Hauser and Kilroy then entered the detached garage where Chavez was located. As the officers questioned Chavez, he snatched the officer's service weapon and began shooting at both officers. Both officers were struck and collapsed to the floor. Chavez fled the scene an made good his escape. When beat 2572 arrived they found Officers Hauser and Kilroy lying on the garage floor, both being shot. Officer Kilroy was shot four times, once in the rear base of the head, once to the top of his left shoulder, once to the left chest and once to the left arm. Officer Hauser was shot three times, once to the top of the head, once to the right chest and once to the right arm pit. Officer Kilroy was transported to Illinois Masonic Medical Center by CFD Ambulance #7 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. J. Abraham at 9:55 p.m. on May 13, 1990. Officer Hauser was transported to Lutheran General Hospital by CFD Ambulance #20 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Guerro at 9:21 p.m. on May 13, 1990.

    On May 14, 1990, at 2:22 a.m., Chavez was apprehended at 2031 North Harlem Avenue by Patrolmen Harold Bone and Frank Ortiz from the Gang Crimes North Section. Ramon Chavez was charged with two counts of first degree murder and armed robbery. He stood trial and was convicted of 1st degree murder, robbery and disarming a peace officer. Chavez was sentenced to two life terms in prison without the possibility of parole.

    Officer Hauser was waked at Montclaire Lucania Funeral Home located at 6901 West Belmont Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. William's Church located at 2558 North Sayre Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 17, 1990 in Elmwood Park Cemetery, 2905 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

    Patrolman Gregory Allen Hauser, born February 21, 1947, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 2, 1970.

    The officers were partners until the end, having joined the Department together twenty years earlier.

    Officer Hauser grew up in the Hyde Park neighborhood and graduated from Bret Harte Elementary school in 1961.

    Officer Hauser served in the U.S. Marine Corps and was Honorably Discharged. He was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Hauser was survived by his wife, Linda (nee Klein), age 50 and children: Andrew Gregory, age 15, Amy Lynn, age 21, Brian Allen, age 23 and Daniel Gregory, age 7.

    Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #N214730.

    On July 23, 1990, Officer Hauser's star was retired by Superintendent LeRoy Martin and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Hauser's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

    On September 9, 2014, the 7000 block of West Palmer Street was dedicated as “Honorary Officers Hauser & Kilroy Drive.” One brown honorary street sign was erected. The sign was located on the northwest corner of Palmer Street and Nordica Avenue in the heart of the Galewood community where Officers Hauser and Kilroy were killed in the line of duty.

    Patrolman Andrew Mathias Hauswirth

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    09 Jan 1890
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    Unknown
    Incident Date:
    28 Sep 1894
    Cause of Death:
    Gunfire - Enemy
    Age:
    29
    End of Watch:
    30 Sep 1894
    Unit of Assignment:
    District 13, 41st Precinct - Sheffield
    Date of Birth:
    08 Jul 1860
    Served:
    4 years, 8 months, 21 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    019 - Town Hall

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # A-3
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 19
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Not Listed
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 60-W: 29

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Andrew Mathias Hauswirth, Star # Unknown, aged 29 years, was a 4 year, 8 month, 21 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 13, 41st Precinct - Sheffield

    On September 28, 1894, at 12:30 a.m., Officer Andrew Hauswirth and his partner, Patrolman Patrick Moore, while on patrol heard two shots fired. As they ran to investigate near the corner of Ashland Avenue and Dunning Street (present day Altgeld Street), they saw two men emerge from a yard on Ashland Avenue. Officer Hauswirth and his partner ordered them to halt, but the suspects fled northbound on Ashland Avenue and the officers gave chase. During the pursuit one offender, a footpad (a highway man operating on foot rather than riding a horse), stopped and turned to open fire on the officers. The footpad, whose last name would later be identified as Reisenbach, fired two rounds. Officer Hauswirth was shot once in his left groin, the other round missing him and Officer Moore. Officer Hauswirth returned fire with several rounds and eventually collapsed to the pavement. Reisenbach was struck in his back on the left side by a round fired from Officer Hauswirth's revolver. He too collapsed and was apprehended and disarmed by Officer Moore. The other footpad continued to flee and turned down a side street and made good his escape. When Officer Moore saw that the second footpad had made good on his escape, he ran to a patrol box located at Diversey and Ashland Avenues and sent calls in for an ambulance and a description of the second footpad.

    Officer Hauswirth was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital where he died two days later on September 30, 1894 at 8:00 p.m. from blood poisoning. Reisenbach was taken to Alexian Brothers Hospital where his condition was considered doubtful. In a disjointed statement, the seriously wounded Reisenbach admitted to hospital personnel that he fired his revolver, but said, "that he himself had just been held up by robbers and with his companion opened fire upon the police, believing them to be [armed robbers.]" Reisenbach's identity could not be fully discovered and he died a few hours later after giving his statement.

    Further investigation revealed that just before the shooting the cries of a man calling for help had been heard by citizens. The man's identity was discovered to be Oscar Johanes and he had just been robbed by three men. It was believed that the men Officers Hauswirth and Moore encountered were two of three men who robbed Mr. Johanes. A detail of policemen was immediately tasked to hunt for the fugitive but the manhunt resulted in negative results. Messages were sent over the north side to arrest all suspicious characters. Patrolmen Broderick and Lang arrested Carl Neike and Oscar Janietza, who was employed by Mr. Johanes at his beer bottling establishment located at 236 Clifton Avenue (present day 2337 North Clifton Avenue). Both men were taken to the Sheffield Avenue station and it is not known if they were ever charged.

    Officer Hauswirth was waked at his residence located at No. 850 Lincoln Avenue (present day 2939 North Lincoln Avenue) and he was laid to rest on October 1, 1894 in Old St. Mary's Cemetery, 510 West Beutel Road, Port Washington, Wisconsin, 53074.

    Patrolman Andrew Mathias Hauswirth, born July 8, 1860 and received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 9, 1890.

    Officer Hauswirth was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Susan (nee Goeden) and five children. His wife died eight years later and the children were left orphaned.

    Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

    On May 24, 2005, Officer Hauswirth's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

    Patrolman Irwin “Irv” Francis Hayden

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    24 Apr 1948
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    4005
    Incident Date:
    10 Aug 1971
    Cause of Death:
    Crash - Helicopter
    Age:
    52
    End of Watch:
    10 Aug 1971
    Unit of Assignment:
    Bureau of Operational Services - Traffic Division, Special Activities Group: Unit 152 - Public Safety Education Bureau
    Date of Birth:
    05 May 1919
    Served:
    23 years, 3 months, 17 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    Bellwood, IL

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # D-5
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 19
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 3, Line 24
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 43-E: 17

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Irwin "Irv" Francis Hayden, Star #4005, aged 52 years, was a 23 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Traffic Division, Special Activities Group: Unit 152 - Public Safety Education Bureau.

    On August 10, 1971, at 4:28 p.m., Officer Hayden was on duty aboard the WGN traffic helicopter in his assignment of reporting traffic conditions in the Chicago area. During the flight, his helicopter suffered an airframe failure and lost control. The helicopter was flying at a low altitude of less than 100 feet, and according to witnesses the copter repeatedly dipped and tilted to one side. Just before the crash the helicopter gained altitude and tilted to one side again. The helicopter then crashed into a 70 foot high tension wire utility pole and fell to the ground bursting into flames. The helicopter came down in a little league baseball field located at 900 Cernan Drive, Bellwood, Illinois. Both Officer Hayden and his Pilot David Demarest, age 29, were killed in the crash. Officer hayden was transported to West Lake Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival at 5:20 p.m. on August 10, 1971.

    A NTSB investigation revealed that the drive system of the tail rotor of the Bell 47G-2A1 helicopter malfunctioned and deprived the pilot of yaw control and directly led to the crash.

    Officer Hayden was waked at Barr Funeral Home located at 6222 North Broadway Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Gertrude's Catholic Church located at 1420 West Granville Avenue and he was laid to rest on August 13, 1971 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

    Patrolman Irwin Francis Hayden, born May 5, 1919, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 24, 1948. He received 27 Complimentary Letters during his career.

    Patrolman Hayden served in the U.S. Army from 1941 to 1945, was a veteran of World War II and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Staff Sergeant. He also served in the U.S. Army Reserve from 1945 to 1971 and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Lieutenant Colonol. Officer Hayden was survived by his wife, Margaret (nee Murphy); children: Margaret (Benjamin) Davis, Patricia, age 17 and Thomas, age 24; brother, Lee and granddaughter, Lori, age 4.

    On May 25, 2006, Officer Hayden's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Hayden's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

    Sergeant Alan Joseph Haymaker

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    05 Dec 1988
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    2532
    Incident Date:
    22 Feb 2010
    Cause of Death:
    Crash - Automobile
    Age:
    56
    End of Watch:
    22 Feb 2010
    Unit of Assignment:
    23rd District - Town Hall
    Date of Birth:
    05 Jul 1953
    Served:
    21 years, 4 months, 14 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    019 - Town Hall

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Maryhill Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # D-9
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 1
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 5, Line 15
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 37-E: 27

    Incident Details:

    Sergeant Alan Joseph Haymaker, Star #2532, aged 56 years, was a 21 year, 4 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 23rd District - Town Hall.

    On February 22, 2010, at 5:06 a.m., Sergeant Haymaker was working 10-99 on beat 2320R. He was responding to a burglary in progress call at a Verizon Wireless store located at 3176 North Clark Street. While driving southbound on Lake Shore Drive, he drove over a patch of ice and his vehicle veered off the road. His squad car jumped a curb and struck a light pole, then a tree located just south of the exit ramp to Irving Park Road at 4100 North Lake Shore Drive. He was transported to Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center by CFD Ambulance #31 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Ricco at 7:33 a.m. on February 22, 2010.

    Other responding units to the burglary were able to apprehend Larry Brown, age 28, of the 16500 block of Park Avenue in Markham, IL. He was charged with burglary and with obstructing identification.

    Sergeant Haymaker was waked at Bethel Community Church located at 7601 West Foster Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at St. Bethel Community Church and he was laid to rest on February 26, 2010 in Maryhill Catholic Cemetery, 8600 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

    Sergeant Alan Joseph Haymaker, born July 5, 1953, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 5, 1988 and attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. He received numerous Honorable Mentions and commendations during his career. On June 25, 1992, he was promoted to Field Training Officer. On June 16, 1999, he was promoted to the rank of Sergeant.

    Sergeant Haymaker was a member of the Policemen's Benevolent and Protective Association. He was survived by his wife, Elaine Blanche (nee Fisher); daughters: Amanda Joy (Daniel) Talavera, age 24, Elyse Beth, age 16 and Melina Sue, age 23; parents: Catherine (nee Gilhooly) and Harry (CPD) and siblings: Diane (Phil) Evans, Gary, Jerome, Paul and Susan Jung Carl.

    Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HS175561 Burglary Report and HS175557 Crash Report.

    On August 31, 2010, Sergeant Haymaker's star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

    Police Officer Jimmie Lamar Haynes

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Housing Authority Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    Aug 1989
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    28
    Incident Date:
    17 Aug 1991
    Cause of Death:
    Gunfire - Enemy
    Age:
    40
    End of Watch:
    17 Aug 1991
    Unit of Assignment:
    Patrol
    Date of Birth:
    25 Jun 1951
    Served:
    1 year, 11 months
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    002 - Wentworth

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Burr Oak Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Not Enshrined
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Not Listed
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 3, Line 47
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 20-E: 18

    Incident Details:

    Police Officer Jimmie Lamar Haynes, Star #28, aged 40 years, was a 1 year, 11 month veteran of the Chicago Housing Authority Police Department, assigned to Patrol.

    On August 15, 1991, at approximately 11:50 p.m., Officer Haynes was on duty. He had just exited the Robert Taylor Homes, a public housing complex, located at 4525 South Federal Street with two fellow officers. The officers returned to their patrol cars and stood in a parking lot. Suddenly the sound of gunfire broke out and Officer Haynes was shot. A sniper using an AR-15 rifle fired upon the officers. Officer Haynes was transported to Mercy Hospital and Nursing Center where he lingered for two days before succumbing to his wound.

    Lorenzo Guye, age 18 of 4331 South Federal Street, Ellean Nance, age 20 of 7851 South Throop Street and a 13-year-old boy were charged with the murder. Guye fired the fatal shot and was also wanted on a separate murder charge at the time of his arrest.

    Officer Haynes' funeral mass was held at Messiah Baptist Church and he was laid to rest in Burr Oak Cemetery, 4400 West 127th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

    Police Officer Jimmie Lamar Haynes, born June 25, 1951, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Housing Authority Police Department in August, 1989. He was in the first academy class to graduate, in October, 1989, from the Chicago Police Academy as Chicago Housing Authority Police Officers.

    Officer Haynes served in the U.S. Army for 20 years and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Sergeant First Class. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Haynes was survived by his wife, Lillie Marie (nee McClennon); children: Meisha and Michael; mother, Johnnie Carter; five brothers and three sisters.

    The Chicago Housing Authority Police Department (CHAPD) was created as a supplement to the Chicago Police Department and formed on October 30, 1989. The Department lasted 10 years almost to the day and was disbanded on October 29, 1999. The Chicago Police Department assumed the responsibilities of the CHAPD. The members of the CHAPD were never officially absorbed into the Chicago Police Department, however quite a few of them re-applied and became Chicago Police Officers. They were required to apply and go through the hiring process as any other person would.

    Patrolman Edward R. Healy

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    08 Jun 1922
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    Unknown
    Incident Date:
    12 Aug 1937
    Cause of Death:
    Accident - Foot Pursuit
    Age:
    38
    End of Watch:
    09 Sep 1937
    Unit of Assignment:
    36th District - Hudson
    Date of Birth:
    12 Apr 1899
    Served:
    35 years, 3 months, 1 day
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    014 - Shakespeare

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # D-9
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 4
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Not Listed
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Not Listed

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Edward Richard Healy, Star # Unknown, aged 38 years, was a 35 year, 3 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 36th District - Hudson.

    On August 12, 1937, Officer Healy was chasing a burglary offender in an alley when he fell on a waist high pole. Officer Healy died at Swedish Covenant Hospital 28 days later on September 9, 1937, after suffering fatal complications during an appendectomy surgery. He was undergoing surgery to correct a problem he was having as a result of the injuries he sustained on August 12, 1937.

    Officer Healy was waked at a residence located at 4525 North Sacramento Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Mercy Church located at 4432 North Troy Street and he was laid to rest on September 11, 1937 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois. His grave is located in Lot N24 Block 8, Section L, Grave 2.

    Patrolman Edward Richard Healy, born April 12, 1899, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 8, 1922. He earned 3 Credible Mentions and 2 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $420.00 during his career.

    Officer Healy was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Esther (nee Atwater); children: Barbara, Bernadine, Geraldine, Joyce and Richard; mother, Mary and siblings: Agnes, Bernadine, Francis, Gertrude Kelly and Joseph.

    On June 25, 2013, Officer Healy's star was retired by Superintendent Garry McCarthy and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

    Patrolman Thomas J. Healy

    Image Not Available
    Agency:
    Chicago Police Department
    Appointed Date:
    21 May 1924
    Death Classification:
    Line of Duty Death
    Star #:
    5416
    Incident Date:
    03 Aug 1927
    Cause of Death:
    Gunfire - Enemy
    Age:
    25
    End of Watch:
    07 Aug 1927
    Unit of Assignment:
    Traffic Division
    Date of Birth:
    18 Feb 1902
    Served:
    3 years, 2 months, 17 days
    District of Incident (Present Day):
    002 - Wentworth

    Memorial Details:

    Cemetery:
    Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
    Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
    Panel # B-11
    Gold Star Families Memorial:
    Panel # 19
    Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 2, Line 20
    National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
    Panel # 3-W: 16

    Incident Details:

    Patrolman Thomas J. Healy, Star #5416, aged 25 years, was a 3 year, 2 month, 17 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Traffic Division.

    On August, 3, 1927, at 11:00 p.m., Officer Healy was off duty and in plain clothes when a black man, Porter Simpson, approached him on the street. Simpson asked him if he would like to call on some women in a nearby flat. Officer Healy decided to raid the disorderly house and relocated with Simpson to a third floor apartment located at 71 East 46th Street. The men made it to the third floor porch when Simpson produced a revolver, announced a robbery and demanded Officer Healy hand over his money. Officer Healy, expecting some such move, had his revolver at the ready and both men opened fire almost simultaneously. Both men were struck by gunfire and fell to the porch floor continuing to shoot at each other until Simpson was killed. Officer Healy was mortally wounded and was shot in his abdomen in which a bullet penetrated his liver. He was transported to Chicago Hospital where he died five days later on August 7, 1927. Simpson was killed on the scene.

    Officer Healy was waked at his residence located at 6810 South Princeton Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Cecilia Catholic Church located at 4515 South Wells Street and he was laid to rest on August 10, 1927 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

    Patrolman Thomas J. Healy, born February 18, 1902, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 21, 1924.

    Officer Healy was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his parents: Joseph M. and Katherine (nee Durkin), siblings: B... (sister), Ernest, Frank, Joseph and the late Charles.

    Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8249.

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