LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

  • The results are being filtered by the character: K
1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman James Joseph Kakacek

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
27 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
462
Incident Date:
15 Apr 1927
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly
Age:
27
End of Watch:
15 Apr 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 14 - Deering
Date of Birth:
09 Sep 1899
Served:
4 years, 5 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 5
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman James Joseph Kakacek, Star #462, aged 27 years, was a 4 year, 5 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 14 - Deering.

On April 15, 1927, at 7:45 p.m., Officer Kakacek and his partner, Patrolman William Allen, were given word via a wire tap to head to a poolroom located at 500 West 25th Place. They were told that two Mexican immigrants, Anthony Bautista and Elis Redon both of 231 West 25th Street, were thought to be there and were wanted for robbery. Officer Kakacek and his partner arrived first in their civilian clothes when two other uniformed officers walked in. Patrolmen Charles F. W. Wetter and Patrick Mullen, working in uniform, of the Flivver Squad were also sent to the location from the Deering Street station. Neither knew that the other was responding. Before Wetter and Mullen arrived, the poolroom’s proprietor, Joseph Lapinelli, pointed out the two men the officers were there for. Officers Kakacek and Allen walked over and began to search the men with guns drawn. Before the officers could complete their search, Officers Wetter and Mullen entered the establishment through separate doors. Hearing the commotion, Officer Kakacek turned as Officer Wetter began shooting at the plainclothes officers thinking they were robbers. As Kakacek fell, officer Wetter recognized him and at the same instant officer Mullen shouted, “Look out, for God's sake. It's Allen. Don’t shoot any more. You’ve killed one of our men.” However, it was to late and Officer Kakacek had already been mortally wounded in the neck with additional shots ranging downward. He was rushed to Mercy Hospital, but died en route.

After the shooting, Patrolman Wetter became hysterical with grief, and his brother officers, fearing he would harm himself, disarmed him. Officer Wetter was taken into custody for his safety and then questioned by Captain John P. Horan, who was convinced the tragedy was accidental and sent him home. On April 16, 1927, Officer Wetter was exonerated by the Coroner and released. Bautista and Redon were also arrested but were later released.

Officer Kakacek was laid to rest in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Patrolman James Joseph Kakacek, born September 9, 1899, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 27, 1922.

Officer Kakacek was survived by his mother and brothers: John Kakacek (CPD) and Joseph Kakacek (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8407.

Patrolman Thomas Joseph Kane

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Mar 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1212
Incident Date:
21 Dec 1922
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
44
End of Watch:
21 Dec 1922
Unit of Assignment:
District 1 - Central
Date of Birth:
08 Apr 1878
Served:
15 years, 9 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 18
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas Joseph Kane, Star #1212, aged 44 years, was a 15 year, 9 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 1 - Central.

On December 21, 1922, Officer Kane was struck by a taxicab as he directed traffic on Wells Street. The impact threw the officer into the air and upon landing; he struck his head on a trolley track. His cause of death was listed as a skull fracture.

Officer Kane was waked at his residence located at 6721 South Carpenter Street and he was laid to rest on December 23, 1922 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas Joseph Kane, born April 8, 1878, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 7, 1907.

Officer Kane was survived by his wife, Catherine.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman Kenneth Guy Kaner

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
29 May 1961
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2662
Incident Date:
19 Jun 1970
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
19 Jun 1970
Unit of Assignment:
7th District - Englewood
Date of Birth:
15 Oct 1936
Served:
9 years, 0 months, 21 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
007 - Englewood

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 5
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 27-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Kenneth Guy Kaner, Star #2662, aged 33 years, was a 9 year, 0 month, 21 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 7th District - Englewood.

On June 19, 1970, at 1:25 a.m., Officer Kaner was working the first watch on beat 723. He was parked and sitting in his squad car at 700 West 74th Street completing a missing person report. As he was working on the report five assailants approached his squad car and one fired a 12-gauge shotgun through the open passenger side window. Officer Kaner was shot in the right side of the face and mortally wounded. His service revolver was taken and the gunmen, Bruce Sharp, age 24, fled in a vehicle with four accomplices; Jerome Amos, age 23, Dwight Cavin, age 17, Bradely Green, age 23 and William Redwine, age 23. Officer Kaner was transported to St. Bernard Hospital by beat 773 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Governale at 1:50 a.m. on June 19, 1970.

The getaway vehicle was stopped within minutes for a missing license plate by Patrolmen Carl Malik and Edward Brown of the 7th District Tactical Unit. Unaware of the shooting that had just occurred the officers curbed the vehicle at 71st Street and Union Avenue. As the officers approached the car they observed a sawed-off shotgun inside. Just then they heard the broadcast of the shooting come over the radio. They alerted the dispatcher that they had the suspects stopped. The men were taken into custody and Officer Kaner's weapon was recovered along with another handgun. Sharp's brother, Tyrone Sharp, was a Chicago Police Officer assigned to the CTA Task Force Detail.

All of the men were arrested and stood trial. All were found guilty except Amos and given varying sentences. On January 19, 1971, Bruce Sharp was sentenced to 30 to 125 years in prison. He is currently serving his time in the Dixon Correctional Center. In 2007, Sharp became eligible for parole, but it was denied by the Illinois Prisoner Review Board. The vote was nine against parole and three for parole. In 2012, Sharp became eligible for parole again. On November 29, 2012, the Illinois Prisoner Review Board denied his parole. The vote was 10 against parole and 4 for parole.

Officer Kaner was waked at Wolniak Funeral Home located at 5700 South Pulaski Road, his funeral mass was held at St. Turlbius Church located at 5646 South Karlov Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 22, 1970 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Kenneth Guy Kaner, born October 15, 1936, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 29, 1961.

Officer Kaner served in the U.S. Army from January 14, 1957 thru January 13, 1959 and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Pauline Katherine (nee Vacco), age 30 and children: Kimberly, age 7 and Kurt Guy, age 5. His son, Kurt, later joined the Chicago Police Department and served as an officer assigned to the Marine unit. Officer Kaner was also a former city Golden Gloves middleweight boxing champion.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #J248024.

On October 21, 1982, the police department honored Officer Kaner's memory by naming the M-1 police boat in the Department's Marine Unit after him.

Patrolman James G. Karl

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Apr 1941
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
690
Incident Date:
11 Aug 1943
Cause of Death:
Fire - Burned
Age:
32
End of Watch:
12 Aug 1943
Unit of Assignment:
24th District - Lawndale
Date of Birth:
01 Jun 1911
Served:
2 years, 4 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Resurrection Catholic Cemetery - Justice, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 5
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman James G. Karl, Star #690, aged 32 years, was a 2 year, 4 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 24th District - Lawndale.

On August 11, 1943, at 8:30 a.m., while on patrol, Officer Karl witnessed a traffic crash. A Phillips Petroleum Company oil truck driven by William Bradley, age 53, of 14410 Springfield Avenue, Midlothian, Illinois, attempted to avoid colliding with two cars which had previously been involved in a traffic crash. Bradley had encountered the two eastbound automobiles which had been divereted into his lane after a minor traffic crash in the eastbound lanes. Bradley did not see the cars under the viaduct and at the last minute attempted to swerve out of the way and lost control of the truck, crashing into a pillar of the Belt Line Viaduct at 4600 West 16th Street. Bradley. He became pinned inside the cab of the truck as gasoline leaked from the truck and pooled around the vehicle. The truck caught fire and was engulfed in flames. Officer Karl attempted to rescue Bradley from the truck before the truck exploded. Officer Karl was able to pull Bradley from the truck before the truck exploded, but both suffered fatal burns. Seventeen other bystanders also sustained injuries from the explosion. Officer Karl was taken taken to Loretto Hospital where he died the following day on August 12, 1943. The other injured parties were taken to Cook County Hospital, Loretto Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital and St. Anthony's Hospital. A third man, Frank Stekly, age 48, of 6020 North Navarre Avenue, also died in Loretto Hospital from the burns he sustained in the explosion. Stekly's cars was behind the oil truck before it crashed.

Officer Karl was waked at a chapel located at 1038 West 47th Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Gall Church located at 5511 South Sawyer Avenue and he was laid to rest on August 14, 1943 in Resurrection Catholic Cemetery, 7201 Archer Avenue, Justice, Illinois.

Patrolman James G. Karl, born June 1, 1911, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 1, 1941.

Officer Karl was survived by his wife, Rose (nee Janousek); children: Donald and Susan and parents: Genevieve (nee Chorvatt) and James.

On November 14, 2006, Officer Karl's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Raymond John Kavanagh

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Feb 1928
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12755
Incident Date:
28 Dec 1928
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle (Pursuit)
Age:
33
End of Watch:
18 Dec 1930
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Section
Date of Birth:
29 Oct 1897
Served:
2 years, 10 months, 0 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
008 - Chicago Lawn

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 5
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 15-E: 28

Incident Details:

Patrolman Raymond John Kavanagh, Star #12755, aged 33 years, was a 2 year, 10 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Section.

On December 28, 1928, Oat 7:40 p.m., Officer Kavanagh was riding his police motorcycle when he spotted a speeding vehicle. The officer was in pursuit of the vehicle southbound on Western Avenue when he struck a curb, at 6624 North Western Avenue, and lost control of his motorcycle. Officer Kavanagh suffered multiple fractures including a skull fracture and was transported to Swedish Covenant Hospital. He survived the incident but was unconscious for 18 days after. Patrolman Kavanagh recovered from the crash and returned to work, however he developed a permanent side effect. He began to suffer from seizures as a result of the crash. Two years later, he underwent brain surgery at Billings Hospital at the University of Chicago to help alleviate the seizures. Officer Kavanagh died during surgery on December 18, 1930.

Officer Kavanagh was waked at his residence located at 1635 North Mayfield Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Angela Catholic Church located at 5758 West Potomac Avenue and he was laid to rest on December 22, 1930 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Raymond John Kavanagh, born October 29, 1897, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 18, 1928. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Kavanagh was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Kathryn (nee Magee); children: Edward Raymond and Jeanne Marie; mother, Ellen and siblings: James, Margaret and Marie.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department Case #AW-12755.

On March 2, 2010, Officer Kavanagh's star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman David F. Keating Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Feb 1940
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2259
Incident Date:
20 Sep 1949
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
20 Sep 1949
Unit of Assignment:
18th District - Stock Yards
Date of Birth:
09 Jul 1912
Served:
9 years, 7 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 6
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 46
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 64-W: 15

Incident Details:

Patrolman David F. Keating, Sr., Star #2259, aged 37 years, was a 9 year, 7 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 18th District - Stock Yards.

On September 20, 1949, at 1:30 a.m., Officer Keating while on duty was standing on a corner at Root Street and Wentworth Avenue talking with some friends. During the conversation he observed two suspicious boys, Sydney Johnson, age 17, and Roosevelt Baccus, age 15, across the street carrying a package which looked like a wrapped shotgun. He cut short his conversation to go investigate. He said goodbye to his friends who told him to be careful and then stepped into a nearby tavern. Officer Keating caught up to the boys at 140 West Root Street. As he approached them, one of the two fired numerous shots from a .32 caliber automatic machine gun, three of which rounds struck him. Officer Keating’s friends weren’t inside the tavern for a moment when they heard the gunfire. They rushed outside and found Officer Keating lying shot on the sidewalk. He was transported and died en route to Evangelical Hospital.

Soon after the shooting over 100 policemen searched the district for the offenders. Their first clue came when they located Ella Evans, age 16, who was the girlfriend of one of the offenders. The offenders were eventually identified and later turned themselves in to an Patrolman Lester Davidson who was off duty at the time. The boys gave a full confession to the murder of Officer Keating, stating that Johnson fired the shots from an automatic pistol which he was carrying. They said that they had just left the home of Ella Evans of 4121 South Wentworth Avenue when Officer Keating had seen them. Also recovered was the automatic pistol used to murder Keating and the shotgun he had suspected the boys were carrying. The package they were carrying contained a 12 gauge shotgun which the boys hid in a manhole at the southwest corner of 39th and Dearborn Streets, where it was recovered.

On September 21, 1949, Sidney Johnson and Roosevelt Baccus were held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner on a charge of murder and indicted. Sydney Johnson was found guilty of 1st degree murder. On May 26, 1950 he was sentenced to death in the electric chair and was given 4 stays of execution over the following 11 months. On April 18, 1951, Governor Adalai E. Stevenson commuted Johnson's sentence to 199 years in prison. The murder charge on Roosevelt Baccus was eventually dropped. He was found guilty of armed robbery and sentenced to serve 5 to 14 years in prison.

Officer Keating was waked at McPhee Funeral Home located at 7133 South Western Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Thomas More Church located at 2825 West 81st Street and he was laid to rest on September 23, 1949 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman David F. Keating, Sr., born July 9, 1912, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 13, 1940. He took a 2 1/2 year leave of absence from the Department to serve in the U.S. Navy during World War II.

Officer Keating served in the U.S. Navy for 2 1/2 years, was a veteran of World War II and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of Division No.6 Ancient Order of Hibernians, Chicago Police Post No. 207 American Legion, Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and St. Jude League. Officer Keating was survived by his wife, Dorothy (nee Renard) and children: David F., Jr., Kathleen, Maureen, and Robert and siblings: Catherine Leonard, Ma Harley, Margaret Keating, Mary, Nancy Cotter and Robert.

Detective James J. Keefe

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Apr 1891
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1620
Incident Date:
05 Jan 1905
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
40
End of Watch:
05 Jan 1905
Unit of Assignment:
District 9, 21st Precinct - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
1865
Served:
13 years, 9 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 35
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 53-E: 7

Incident Details:

Detective James J. Keefe, Star #1620, aged 40 years, was a 13 year, 9 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 9, 21st Precinct - Maxwell.

On January 5, 1905, at 12:00 p.m., Detective Keefe in company with Lieutenant Thomas Meagher and Detectives Richard Bermingham, King and Voss set out to arrest two known men wanted for armed robbery. The men were Frank Gagen and Harry Feinberg and were holdup in Gagen’s brother’s house located at No. 68 West 25th Place (present day 628 West 25th Place), near Wallace Street. Frank Gagen, a parolee, was wanted for several armed robberies and for shooting a policeman. When the officers arrived, Edward Gagen met them at the door. Lieutenant Meagher asked him the whereabouts of his brother and Feinberg. Edward declared that his brother and Feinberg were in his place.

While the Lieutenant was asking questions, the other Detective surrounded the building and Detective Keefe went to the back and knocked loudly. Edward Gagen then went to the back door and opened it. Officer Keefe made entry through the kitchen followed by Detective Birmingham. As Detective Keefe walked toward a closed bedroom door, just off the kitchen, those inside the room suddenly opened fire. Detective Keefe was struck in the chest and abdomen and fell to the floor. Detective Keefe yelled, “Help me boys, I'm shot! For God's sake, come to me!“ Detective Birmingham rushed to his aide and as he kicked open another door he was shot in the abdomen, the bullet then embedding itself in his watch. Detective Birmingham also sustained three broken ribs. The other detectives were rushing into the house at this time and gunfire was exchanged with the bandits. Feinberg escaped through the rear door. However, he didn't make good his escape before being shot in the back and leg as he fled by one of the other policemen. Frank Gagen was shot in his left side and through his right arm and then captured by Lieutenant Meagher after Feinberg had fled. Detectives Birmingham and Keefe were rushed to Mercy Hospital where Detective Keefe succumbed to his injuries during surgery within 30 minutes of arriving. Frank Gagen was taken to the 22nd Street Station along with his wife and mother. Once there, the true extent of his injuries was learned and was then taken to Mercy Hospital.

Meanwhile when Feinberg fled he boarded a northbound Archer Avenue streetcar at Wallace Street. He then walked to 26th Street and Wabash Avenue to a store where he purchased a pair of overalls and a cap to disguise himself. Next he boarded a Southbound Cottage Grove Avenue cable car. All the while he was losing blood from his gunshot wound and became weak. At 41st Street and Cottage Grove, he alighted from the cable car and went into the Blood & Walgreen’s drug store. Inside he told Mr. Walgreen that he had been shot and asked that an ambulance be summoned. While awaiting the ambulance, one of the stores clerks dictated a letter for Feinberg. The letter read as follows, “Dear Min, I love you as I always did. This is the last of me, I guess. I hope you think the same of me as you always did, and I am sorry to bring you to so much trouble. I tried to be good, but I was hounded. I am terribly wronged by those who said things against me. My love and best wishes. Do not grieve for me, but take life as it comes. Harry.” Feinberg was taken to Mercy Hospital and died from his bullet wounds on January 9th, 1905.

On January 24, 1905, Frank Gaghan was held by the Coroner. On April 6, 1905, Frank Gaghen was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge McEwan.

Detective Keefe was waked at his residence located at No. 208 Newberry Avenue (present day 1501 North Newberry Avenue), his funeral mass was held at Holy Family Church located at 1080 West Roosevelt Road and he was laid to rest on January 8, 1905 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. His grave is located in Lot S13, Block 33, Section U.

Detective James J. Keefe, born in 1865, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 4, 1891. He earned the Carter Harrison Medal in 1899. Detective Keefe was first assigned to the Canalport Avenue Station and then transferred to the Maxwell Street Station. He was known for breaking up the notorious Lally Gang after shooting its leader, McCauley.

Detective Keefe was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the John Wheeler Council No. 1105 Royal Arcanum. He was survived by his wife, Mary; children: John, Joseph, Mary and Thomas and brothers: Joseph and Michael.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #1210.

As written in the Report of the General Superintendent of Police for 1902, the tale of Officer Keefe’s bravery which earned him the Carter Harrison Medal are as follows. Police Captain Wheeler reported as follows: James Keefe, patrolman, 21st precinct. “On January 13th, 1899, while we were working on the murder of Officer E. J. WaIner of the 23rd precinct, I confiscated a letter sent to George Simpson, one of the suspects in the case. The letter was mailed at Watseka, Ill., and signed by Sam Rich. Not knowing that he was one of the party wanted, I called Officer James Keefe of this station, and wrote a decoy letter and told Keefe to go to Watseka and put the letter in the post office, and when he came for it to arrest him and bring him to me.“

“When Officer Keefe got to Watseka he found that the man's name was Sam Jones, and that he lived three miles out in the county with a bachelor uncle. Officer Keefe got the town marshal and his assistant and went to the house at 11 o'clock at night, and when the marshal tried to get in the uncle said, 'he would kill the first man that came into the place.' Both marshals then left Keefe alone and he (Keefe) forced the door open. There he saw a man with a shotgun pointed at him, also a young man, and jumping behind the latter, Officer Keefe drew his revolver and placed the muzzle of it against the young man's side, at the same time telling the man with the gun that if he did not lower it he would kill the young fellow. During this time Officer Keefe kept the young man between himself and the man who had then leveled on him. He finally' got the fellow out and returned to the city early in the morning on the 14th of January. The fellow proved to be the right one and made a full confession of the whole matter.“

“It was a very meritorious act, from the fact that Officer Keefe, when deserted by the officers of the law of that community, fearlessly stuck to his post virtually at the jaws of death, and accomplished his purpose by landing in Chicago one of the coolest and most determined young vandals, who is now serving sentence in Joliet for murder and robbery.“

Patrolman Eugene J. Keegan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Mar 1911
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
571
Incident Date:
09 Feb 1928
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
42
End of Watch:
09 Feb 1928
Unit of Assignment:
1st District - Central Detail
Date of Birth:
04 Apr 1885
Served:
16 years, 11 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-11
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 6
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 25-E: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Eugene J. Keegan, Star #571, aged 42 years, was a 16 year, 11 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st District - Central Detail.

On February 9, 1928, at 1:40 p.m., Officer Keegan and Lieutenant Edward T. Murphy went to the 3rd floor apartment of a gunman, Rose Elliott, located at 131 East 35th Street, who was wanted for murder.

The tale of events began earlier in the day. Elliott, had murdered two employees, James Ellis and Charles Miller, at the Omaha Packing Company plant located at 2320 South Halsted Street. Elliott had been an employee at the plant until he was fired on October 6, 1927 after being involved in a fight with Ellis. Elliott held a grudge over the fight for four months. With his anger boiling over he waited outside the plant for James Ellis. When Ellis showed up, Elliot confronted him and a verbal altercation ensued. With the argument getting heated, Elliott produced a large caliber semi-automatic firearm and shot Ellis. Elliot also shot Charles Miller, another plant employee, who was with Elliot at the time of the altercation. Elliott then fled to the home of his brother, Nathan where he was located by police.

Upon arrival at the apartment, Lieutenant Murphy and Officer Keegan were met by three other officers. The three assisting officers covered the entrances as Lieutenant Murphy and Officer Keegan knocked on the door. Elliott's brother opened the door and said that his brother was not in the home, but rolled his eyes signaling the officers toward a closed door inside the apartment. Officer Murphy thrust open the door and Elliott immediately opened fire. Both Lieutenant Murphy and Officer Kegan sustained multiple gunshot wounds and were killed almost instantly. Hearing the gunshots, the three assisting officers rushed into the apartment and concentrated their fire on Rose Elliot. Rose Elliott was struck multiple times and died on scene. Nathan Elliott, Rose’s brother, was shot accidentally by one of the three officers when he stepped into the crossfire. Nathan Elliott died from his gunshot wounds the next day on February 10, 1928.

Officer Keegan was waked at his residence located at 1810 North Mansfield Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Angela Catholic Church located at 5758 West Potomac Avenue and he was laid to rest on February 13, 1928 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Eugene J. Keegan, born April 4, 1885, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 4, 1911. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $240.00 during his career.

Officer Keegan was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and Americus Council No. 1270 Knights of Columbus. He was survived by his father, Bryan and siblings: Anna, Bernard and Elizabeth.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #10298.

Probationary Patrolman John Keegan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Jun 1887
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
768
Incident Date:
04 Nov 1887
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
04 Nov 1887
Unit of Assignment:
3rd Precinct - West Madison Street Station
Date of Birth:
1849
Served:
4 months, 21 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 40-E: 2

Incident Details:

Probationary Patrolman John Keegan, Star #768, aged 38 years, was a 4 month, 21 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd Precinct - West Madison Street Station.

On November 3, 1887, at 11:45 p.m., Officer Keegan reported in to the station by pulling the patrol box located at Van Buren Street and Albany Avenue. This was the last time he reported in and the reports abruptly stopped coming in. Per regulation he was to check in every hour with the station confirming that all is well.

On November 4, 1887, at 6:00 a.m., Officer Keegan was located at Polk Street and Albany Avenue. He was found lying in a prairie dead from a gunshot wound to the forehead. One of his hands was lying on his breast still grasping his .44 caliber Colt revolver. Only one chamber of the revolver was empty and there were no signs of a struggle at the scene. He was transported to Hursen’s undertaking shop located at No. 976 West Lake Street (present day 2322 West Lake Street). The same day County Physician Meyer conducted an autopsy. It was learned that the muzzle of the gun had been placed against his forehead when the fatal shot was fired. The flesh was lacerated and powder marks were found in the wound. The bullet was removed from the base of his skull from behind.

On November 5, 1889, at 10:00 a.m., a Corner’s Inquest was held at Officer Keegan’s residence located at No. 983 Washington Boulevard (present day 2532 Washington Boulevard). No cause was known to exist to induce Keegan to take his life. His domestic life was happy and he was not a drinking man. He was considered a good officer having no troubles in his official capacity. No one heard him make any remarks indicating he contemplated committing suicide. He was a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters and the sole suspicion that he may have committed suicide was the fact that he paid his dues, which were in arrears, in full the day before his death.

Through investigation it was suspected that Officer Keegan was murdered sometime between 11:45 p.m. and 1:00 a.m., the time in which his shift ended. Officially his death was ruled a homicide and the belief that he committed suicide was discounted. His murder remains unsolved.

Officer Keegan was waked at his residence located at No. 983 Washington Boulevard (present day 2532 Washington Boulevard) and he was laid to rest in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Probationary Patrolman John Keegan, born in 1849, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 14, 1887.

Officer Keegan was a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters. He was survived by his wife and two children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2807.

Sergeant Thomas W. Kehoe

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Oct 1908
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
900
Incident Date:
23 Jun 1927
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
52
End of Watch:
23 Jun 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 33 - Summerdale
Date of Birth:
19 Oct 1874
Served:
18 years, 8 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
020 - Lincoln

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-11
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 20
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 20-W: 8

Incident Details:

Sergeant Thomas W. Kehoe, Star #900, aged 52 years, was a 18 year, 8 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 33 - Summerdale.

On June 23, 1927, at approximately 12:00 a.m., a citizen, E. S. Cooper and his wife, came into the Summerdale station to report their automobile stolen. According to Cooper he had been driving on Berwyn Avenue between Lincoln and Western Avenues when another man, Jack Leathers of Normal, Illinois, brandishing a gun and driving a large vehicle forced his vehicle to the curb. Leathers then exited his car and jumped onto the running board of Cooper’s car and pointed his gun at him. Leathers then ordered Cooper to drive east. After driving a short distance, Leathers ordered Cooper to pull over and robbed him of $5.00 and then threw him out of the car.

While Mr. Cooper was in the process of telling his story to police, Patrolman James Farley and Sergeant Thomas Kehoe monitored a call which came into the station of a suspicious man with a flashlight trying to break into and apartment located at 2451 West Gunnison Street. Sergeant Kehoe and Officer Farley responded to the scene. While en route, at 1:35 a.m., the officers spotted a vehicle matching the description of Mr. Cooper’s automobile parked in front of 4936 North Rockwell Avenue with a man and women seated inside. The officers confirmed the auto to be Cooper’s and moved in to investigate. While attempting to place the male occupant, Jack Leathers, in custody he produced a revolver firing at the officers. The officers returned fire and a firefight ensued with all three men being hit and eventually succumbing to their wounds. While the gunfire was being exchanged, the female occupant of the car fled the scene.

Police investigating the shooting were able to identify Leathers by running his fingerprints. He had served time at the Pontiac Reformatory at the age of 19. Police also discovered that the car used to force Mr. Cooper to the curb was also stolen from Emil Svedian on June 22, 1927 at 10:30 p.m.

Sergeant Kehoe was waked at his residence located at 2853 West Leland Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Mercy Church located at 4432 North Troy Street and he was laid to rest June 27, 1927 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Sergeant Thomas W. Kehoe, born October 19, 1874, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 1, 1908. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915. On June 28, 1921, he was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Kehoe served in the Armed Forces, was a veteran of World War I and the Spanish American War and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Catherine Finn and sister, Mrs. J. J. Touhey.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8026.

Detective Lyons Kelliher

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Dec 1932
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6695
Incident Date:
25 Jan 1956
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
52
End of Watch:
25 Jan 1956
Unit of Assignment:
27th District - Warren
Date of Birth:
11 Aug 1903
Served:
23 years, 1 month, 2 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 1
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 15-W: 15

Incident Details:

Detective Lyons Kelliher, Star #6695, aged 52 years, was a 23 year, 1 month, 2 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 27th District - Warren.

On January 25, 1956, Detective Kelliher and his partner, Detective William Derrig, were conducting a routine investigation to check reports that a club was a hangout for narcotics addicts. Detective Kelliher and Derrig entered the Boulevard Hotel located at 2801 West Warren Boulevard and approached James Worthy, age 22, and Donald Lawrence, age 17, in the hotels Colonial Room Tavern, a combination tavern and restaurant. As Detective Derrig was searching Lawrence, the man pulled out a revolver from his belt and shot Detective Derrig in the right hand and in the right foot. Detective Derrig's wounds prevented him from reaching for his own gun. Meanwhile, Detective Kelliher was searching James Worthy. Detective Kelliher lunged at Lawrence, who then shot him twice in the chest. Lawrence fled the tavern and Detective Derrig pursued. As the two ran out of the hotel they passed Linda Spears, age 26, who was waiting for a bus and had heard the shots. Spears remarked that she saw Lawrence run past her with a gun when he dropped his scarf, which was covered in blood. She also saw Detective Derrig in pursuit with a bloody right hand. At that time, Spears said she joined the pursuit with Derrig and saw Derrig fire one shot at Lawrence as he ran. She said to Derrig that he was hurt, and Derrig said "pay me no attention, go inside and lookout for my partner." Spears obeyed and went inside to find Detective Kelliher lying on the floor. She told the people inside to call the police and asked for ice water and a towel. She wiped the blood from Kelliher's face and moistened his lips. She didn't want to say it at the time, but she thought it was too late for Kelliher and she sobbed. Meanwhile, outside, Lawrence made good his escape. Detective Kelliher was taken to Illinois Research hospital where he died. Detective Derrig was taken to St. Anne's Hospital where he made a full recovery. The gunman, unknown at the time of the shooting, was described as 5 feet 7 inches tall. He was wearing a light colored hat, light gray trousers, and a black jacket. He was armed with a snub nosed .38 caliber revolver.

The biggest police manhunt since the capture of Richard Carpenter, police slayer, from August of 1955 was under way for the murderer of Detective Lyons Kelliher. Virtually without clews top police officials, including Lieutenant Patrick Deeley, Chief of Detectives, and Captain John Ryan of Warren Avenue Station admitted that they had only the faintest leads to the murderer. More than 20 police squads, aided by details from virtually every District and policemen who offered their services on their days off concentrated on the search. Detective Derrig gave police an entirely different description of the murderer from that given by witnesses in the tavern, said to have had about 38 customers at the time. Three of the witnesses, James Worthy of 2667 West Maypole Avenue; Andrew Jones, age 48, of 3000 West Washington Boulevard, assistant manager and bartender at the saloon, and Caroline Cooper, age 23, of 2801 West Warren Boulevard, a waitress, were given lie detector tests because their descriptions of the assailant did not tally with Derrig's, but were released. The conflict over their descriptions was not resolved. Derrig said the murderer was a light skinned black man, about 19 or 20, 5 feet 5 inches in height, weighing 130 pounds, wearing a salt and pepper blue coat of fingertip length, light blue pants, and a light blue gray fedora hat. The others described him as darker skinned, older, and wearing darker clothes.

Donald Lawrence was brought to justice because Patrolman Julian Ford; a young black policeman, made an investigation of the case in a fashion for which there would never be a substitute in good police procedure. Ford knew Detective Kelliher, and had formerly served with him in the Warren Avenue District. He also felt that the murder, by a young black man, would reflect on his people if it were not solved quickly. On his time off he went about the District, patiently asking questions. He got the feeling that people who had information were withholding it from him. But he persisted, talking to hundreds of people. Word of his activities got about. A woman, whom he didn't know, telephoned him and told him where she thought the killer could be found. Thru her information Ford found three men who named Lawrence, who was found in custody at Fort Sheridan. He had been picked up running through a park, arrested, and turned over to military authorities the night of the killing. Lawrence was an AWOL soldier from Camp Carson Colorado, rank of private.

Ford's commendable work raised a point in the recent discussions, at the time, over whether Chicago policemen should be required to live within the city. The policeman who did live in the city had an advantage when he started an investigation. People who knew him as a neighbor would be more ready to give him information than they would be to talk to a stranger.

Lawrence later confessed that he shot Derrig when Derrig felt a gun in his pocket while searching him, and then shot Kelliher in the chest. He turned and once again shot Derrig as he ran out of the tavern. During the Coroner’s inquest, Lawrence refused to testify on the advice of his attorney.

Donald Lawrence's trial began on March 26, 1956; he was found guilty on a plea of murder and convicted of Detective Kelliher's murder. On March 27, 1956, Lawrence was sentenced to 199 years in prison by Judge James R. Bryant. Lawrence was ineligible for parole until he reached 84 years of age.

Detective Kelliher was waked at Williams Funeral Home located at 412 North Austin Boulevard, his funeral mass was held at St. Catherine of Sienna St. Lucy Parish Church located at 38 North Austin Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois and he was laid to rest on January 30, 1956 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Detective Lyons Kelliher, born August 11, 1903, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 23, 1932. He earned 6 Credible Mentions and 3 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $360.00 during his career. Detective Kelliher was also a professional football player with the 1928 Chicago Cardinals.

Detective Kelliher was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Jane Apps; sons: David P. and Thomas L.; siblings: Agnes, Ann Lynch, John J., Marie, Richard T. and Rose Goedert; grandchild, David M. Kelliherand nephew, Michael J. Goedert. Officer Kelliher was also the son of retired Captain Patrick Kelliher who retired after more than 36 years of service.

On December 31, 1957, Detective Kelliher's star was retired by Commissioner Timothy J. O'Connor and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Detective Kelliher's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

In June 1962, the police department honored Detective Kelliher's memory by naming the brand new M-3 police boat in the Department's Marine Unit after him.

Patrolman Phillip J. Kelly

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Dec 1932
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6161
Incident Date:
03 May 1939
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
10 May 1939
Unit of Assignment:
36th District - Hudson
Date of Birth:
19 Jan 1905
Served:
6 years, 4 months, 17 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 41
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 10-W: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Philip J. Kelly, Star #6161, aged 34 years, was a 6 year, 4 month, 17 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 36th District - Hudson.

On May 3, 1939, Officer Kelly, while off duty in plain clothes, was in a tavern, the Eastwood Inn located at 4623 North Western Avenue. Officer Kelly was sitting at the bar with another off duty officer, Patrolman Kelly McIntyre and his wife. As Officer McIntyre was talking with an undertaker, Alex Ferguson, the bandits, Edward Riley and Orville Watson, entered the tavern a few minutes apart and sat at the bar between the two officers. The two bandits, after ordering beers, stood up and announced a robbery. Officer McIntyre immediately moved away from his wife and reached for his gun but it was stuck in his holster. The bandits, seeing him reach for his gun, opened fire and struck McIntyre, Kelly and Ferguson. McIntyre freed his gun and returned fire along with Officer Kelly. The bartender, Harry Bonin, slipped out a side door and ran for help. When Bonin returned to the tavern after summoning help, he encountered the bandits. Riley was holding up Watson who had been shot in the back by McIntyre. When Riley saw Bonin he attempted to shoot him but his gun was empty. Realizing the gun was empty, Riley and Watson made good their escape.

Bonin then went inside the tavern and discovered a gruesome scene. Ferguson was struck and instantly killed. Officer McIntyre was struck by a bullet in his right temple which then exited his left temple. Officer Kelly was shot in the right shoulder, abdomen and right wrist. Both officers were transported to Ravenswood Hospital. Officer Kelly desperately needed a blood transfusion after losing a large amount. Patrolman Larry Dellamria donated blood for the transfusion. Officer Kelly languished for seven days in the hospital succumbing to his wounds on May 10, 1939. Officer Kelly’s father, brothers and friend Miss Marion Klauk were all with him as he took his last breath. Officer McIntyre, despite doctors’ refusal to predict his survivability, beat all expectations of survival and recovered from his injuries.

After the shootout the gunmen, Riley and Watson, summoned a doctor from his home and forced him at gunpoint to go with them to their apartment and remove the bullet from Watson. The next day the suspects fled to Michigan. On the same day Officer Kelly died, they were captured outside of Detroit, Michigan by Chief of Detectives John L. Sullivan who brought them back to Chicago. Chief Sullivan also arrested Susana Smith and brought her back as well. On June 19, 1939, Riley and Watson both entered pleas of guilty in the death of Alex Ferguson. They were both sentenced to death in the electric chair to be carried out on July 7, 1939. Their sentences were suspended pending an appeal to the Supreme Court during its October session. The court upheld the convictions and on June 20, 1941 the men’s sentences were carried out.

Officer Kelly was waked at his residence located at 4730 North Virginia Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Queen of Angels Catholic Church located at 2330 West Sunnyside Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 13, 1939 in All Saints Catholic Cemetery, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Patrolman Philip J. Kelly, born January 19, 1905, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 23, 1932.

Officer Kelly was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his father, John P. and siblings: Edwin V., Harold R. and Marion L. Collins.

Patrolman Raymond C. Kelly

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Mar 1928
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5396
Incident Date:
03 Apr 1932
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
31
End of Watch:
03 Apr 1932
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
01 Jan 1901
Served:
4 years, 0 months, 15 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 32
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 40-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Raymond C. Kelly, Star #5396, aged 31 years, was a 4 year, 0 month, 15 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Wabash.

On April 3, 1932, at 3:25 p.m., Officer Kelly with his partner, Patrolman Robert Fawcett, responded to a disturbance at 5742 South State Street. Edward Wash, who had been drinking all day, had gone into a homicidal rage. He had shot a boarder of his, Margento Fernandez, in the left arm. Fernandez was able to escaped the second floor apartment and call for police. He informed the police of what had occurred and that they would be looking for Wash. As Officer’s Kelly and Fawcett arrived they met with a crowd of people who had gathered in front to observe the commotion. The officers learned of Wash’s approximate location from the crowd and relocated to the fourth floor and each began knocking on different doors in an attempt to locate Wash. Wash opened a door that Officer Kelly had knocked on and instantly fired his weapon at Kelly. Officer Kelly returned fire, forcing Wash to retreat into the apartment. Wash continued to fire through the closed apartment door as Fawcett raced to pull Kelly from the line of fire while at the same time returning fire.

Officer Fawcett carried Kelly downstairs and as they pushed through the crowd, which had grown in size to several hundred people, reinforcements began to arrive. Fawcett loaded Kelly into his squad car and rushed him to Washington Hospital with Detectives Martin McGuire and McKeown. Officer Kelly suffered serious wounds and died while en route to the hospital. The other responding officers gathered outside the apartment building and attempted to devise the safest way to subdue Wash. By this time more than 50 officers had responded. Wash not deterred by the number of police, continued to fire at officers. Police shot tear gas canisters into his apartment in an attempt to stop him from shooting. After Officer Kelly’s death was confirmed, Detective McGuire returned to the scene and shot and killed Wash.

Officer Kelly was laid to rest on April 6, 1932 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Raymond C. Kelly, born January 1, 1901, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 19, 1928.

Officer Kelly was survived by his wife; child; mother, Catherine (nee Magner) and siblings: George (CPD), John (CPD), Lawrence, Jr. (CPD) and William (CPD). His father, Lawrence, Sr., was also a Chicago Police Officer.

Patrolman Thomas J. Kelly

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
28 Feb 1966
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12145
Incident Date:
03 Mar 1970
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
26
End of Watch:
03 Mar 1970
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Field Services - Patrol Division: Unit 051 - Area 1 Task Force
Date of Birth:
30 Dec 1943
Served:
4 years, 0 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 21
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 53-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas J. Kelly, Star #12145, aged 26 years, was a 4 year, 0 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Field Services - Patrol Division: Unit 051 - Area 1 Task Force.

On March 3, 1970, at 3:15 p.m., Officer Kelly and his partner, Patrolman Thomas C. Neustrom, age 22, were working the third watch on beat 6123. The officers were in full uniform and were driving in their unmarked squad car. They had just began their break and were going to pick up tuxedos for Officer Kelly's wedding when they observed gang activity. They observed a group of suspicious characters including Charles H. Connolly, age 25 and Frank Luckett, age 19 enter a parked vehicle on South Vincennes Avenue. The officers curbed the vehicle 360 East 44th Street. Both officers proceeded to walk to the driver's side window and ask the driver, Connolly, for identification. Upon opening his wallet and providing the officers with fake identification, the officers noticed he had two sets of different social security cards and licenses. Officer Kelly began questioning Connolly, as Officer Neustrom searched Luckett and then the vehicle. Officer Kelly asked Connolly if he could search him and he complied. As the officer attempted to search him, Connolly pulled out a gun and fatally shot Officer Kelly. Upon hearing the gunshots, Neustrom was able to draw his weapon but was struck twice before he could return fire. Officer Neustrom pretended to be dead, as Connolly dragged his body out of the vehicle and pressed the gun barrel to his head. As the gunman attempted to pull the trigger again, the gun misfired and did not discharge. Both offenders then fled the scene on foot making good their escape. Officer Kelly was transported to Provident Hospital by beat 270 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Joassin at 3:25 p.m. on March 3, 1970. Officer Neustrom was taken to Michael Reese Hospital by beat 202 where he underwent surgery and made a full recovery.

Connolly and Lucket were discovered later the same day at 6543 South Wood Street. More than 100 police and firemen surrounded the building and fired tear gas through windows. The offenders were placed in custody and charged accordingly. During interviews Connolly denied he was the shooter and accused his accomplice, Frank Luckett of being the shooter. On March 16, 1960, at the age of 14, Connolly had been found guilty of robbing and murdering a man on his front porch. He was sentenced to 25 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary, but had been granted an early release. If not for the early release, Connolly would have still been incarcerated at the time of Officer Kelly's death.

On September 20, 1970, Charles Connolly was found guilty of Officer Kelly's murder and guilty of aggravated battery in connection with the shooting of Officer Neustrom. On October 21, 1970, he was sentenced to be executed in the electric chair by Judge Downing. The courts later overturned the death penalty and he was re-sentenced to 75 to 150 years in prison by Judge Fitzgerald. In 2006, Connolly admitted to murdering Officer Kelly and shooting Officer Neustrom at his clemency hearing.

On July 29, 2010, the Chicago Police Memorial Foundation chartered a bus and 30 officers in uniform traveled to Springfield for Connolly's parole hearing. The Illinois Prisoner Review Board voted unanimously to reject his parole request. He was also given the maximum time of three years before he would be up for parole again. Again on September 29, 2013 the Illinois Prisoner Review Board voted unanimously to reject his parole request and ruled that he would not be eligible for parole again until 2018.

Officer Kelly was waked at Sheehy Funeral Home located at 10727 South Pulaski Road, his funeral mass was held at St. Mary of Mount Carmel Catholic Church located at 125 West 5th Street, Mount Carmel, Illinois and he was laid to rest on March 7, 1970 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas J. Kelly, born December 30, 1943, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 28, 1966. He earned 1 Superintendent's Award of Valor (posthumously), 1 Police Blue Star Award (posthumously) and 20 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Kelly served in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve from June 24, 196 until his death and he was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Illinois Police Association, Fraternal Order of Police and the St. Jude Police League. Officer Kelly was survived by his fiancée, Joanna Polo; parents: John Joseph, age 54 and Ann F. (nee Izzo), age 56; siblings: Jack (CPD), Robert (CPD) and a sister (CPD) and grandparents: Carmen Izzo and Mary Izzo.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #J081768.

Patrolman Thomas Kelma

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Apr 1926
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
427
Incident Date:
31 May 1935
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
31 May 1935
Unit of Assignment:
22nd District - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
15 Sep 1899
Served:
9 years, 1 month, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Acacia Park Cemetery - Norridge, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 38
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-E: 4

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas Kelma, Star #427, aged 35 years, was a 9 year, 1 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 22nd District - Maxwell.

On May 31, 1935, at 9:30 p.m., Officer Kelma was off duty and playing a game of cards in a rear room of Ray Curran’s Tavern located at 2023 South Ashland Avenue. Two gunmen, Edward Derlack, age 27 and Jerry Reporto, age 24, entered the tavern, one ordered Kelma and his friends to raise their hands while the other moved towards the card table. Officer Kelma was sitting with his back to the door and was unaware of the gunman’s presence until they announced a stickup and demanded a card player, Joseph Jira, hand over his winnings. Once Kelma realized what was taking place he reacted by flipping the card table over at the same time he drew his weapon and fired at the gunmen. The gunman then got nervous and fled the tavern without any proceeds to an awaiting Ford sedan. They were met by their accomplices, Thomas Arelando, age 21 and Frank Bankes, age 28. Officer Kelma followed the gunmen outside the tavern and was met by a barrage of gunfire from the cars passengers. Kelma returned fire, but was struck two times in chest, one bullet hitting his heart causing him to collapse onto the sidewalk. The bandits then made good their escape.

Soon after a police squad in command of Sergeant Richard Adamek responded to the scene and transported Officer Kelma to St. Anthony's Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

All four suspects were eventually apprehended, arrested and were charged with Officer Kelma's murder. On July 26, 1935, Thomas Arelando was sentenced to serve 14 years in prison; Edward Derlack was sentenced to serve 199 years in prison; and Jerry Reporto was sentenced to serve life at the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Frank Bankes committed suicide in Cook County Jail before he was sentenced.

Officer Kelma was waked at a chapel located at 1021 West 19th Street, his funeral mass was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest on June 4, 1935 in Bohemian National Cemetery, 5255 North Pulaski Road, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas Kelma, born September 15, 1899, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 26, 1926.

Officer Kelma was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Agnes (nee Wachuta); children: Patricia, Peter Szymkowak and Rosemary; father, Peter Szymkowak, Sr. and siblings: Anna, John, Joseph, Lillian, May and Peter, Jr.

Patrolman Hugh Kennedy

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
787
Incident Date:
20 Jan 1931
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
39
End of Watch:
20 Jan 1931
Unit of Assignment:
30th District - West North
Date of Birth:
13 Sep 1891
Served:
9 years, 7 months, 13 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
Cicero, IL

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Hugh Kennedy, Star #787, aged 39 years, was a 9 year, 7 month, 13 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 30th District - West North.

On January 20, 1931, Patrolman Kennedy was found dead with a gunshot to the head in a vacant lot near 52nd (Laramie Avenue) and Ogden Avenues, in Cicero, IL. His service revolver was also missing. An unknown motorist was wanted in connection with Officer Kennedy's death. The investigation of Officer Kennedy's death was delayed until February 4, 1931 to enable the police to investigate clues. It was believed, at first, that the policeman had been taken for a ride by gangsters.

According to his widow, Mrs. Angela Kennedy, the policeman left his home at 4742 West West End Avenue at 1:00 p.m. Monday, January 19, 1931 saying he would be home for dinner. At 5:00 p.m. he called again saying he was on his way home. Nothing was heard from him after that until his body was found.

According to Mary Monhardt, niece of Officer Kennedy, the following statements were made by family members just after the Officer's death. Ms. Monhardt's mother stated “When Uncle Hugh was killed we were warned not to talk about it to anybody.“ Ms. Monhardt heard her aunt Ange say “Uncle Hugh was thrown out of a black car onto her front lawn that night.“ “She thought he was alive at that time.“ Later, older cousins told Ms. Monhardt that “Uncle Hugh's service revolver was found in a shoemakers’ shop in the neighborhood.“ Ms. Monhardt remembers her Father going there and it was common knowledge that it was a bookie place.

The Coroner's Physician, Thomas L. Dwyer said Kennedy died as a result of a broken back and internal injuries. He expressed the belief that Kennedy had been struck by an automobile, picked up by the driver to be taken to a hospital, and then was thrown out when it was discovered that he was dead. The Coroner’s theory was logical except it didn’t explain the gunshot wound.

Captain, Charles McGurn of the West North Avenue Station, to which Kennedy had been assigned, testified that Kennedy was an efficient policeman. His duties, watching school crossings, were not of a nature to create enemies, Captain McGurn pointed out. Kennedy had never served on a vice or gambling squad.

Further investigation led police to Vito Lotresci, age 45, and his son Sam, age 24. The Lotresci home had been burglarized by four youths and the youths who committed the burglary were later apprehended. The four youths gave confessions and stated that they took a revolver from the home that belonged to Officer Kennedy. With this new evidence, police linked Vito Lotesci to the murder and during interrogation; Lotresci stated that the gun was found six years earlier by his son, Sam. Sam Lotresci also confirmed his father’s story, but the stories were not 100 percent accurate. Without any further evidence, the case was dropped and the Lotesci’s were released. The full circumstances of Officer Kennedy's death still remain a mystery.

Officer Kennedy was waked at his residence located at 4742 West West End Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Thomas Aquinas Church located at 5112 West Washington Boulevard. He was laid to rest on January 23, 1931 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Hugh Kennedy, born September 13, 1891, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 7, 1922. Prior to joining the Chicago Police Department Kennedy was a Special Policemen.

Officer Kennedy was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the Charles Carroll Council No. 780 Knights of Columbus. He was survived by his wife, Angela (nee Tracy-Kennedy); siblings: Anna Casey, Daniel, Jeremiah, Thomas and William.

Patrolman John Francis Kenny

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Dec 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
11 Nov 1916
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
33
End of Watch:
23 Nov 1916
Unit of Assignment:
District 18, 29th Precinct - Warren
Date of Birth:
15 Aug 1883
Served:
9 years, 11 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
District of Incident Unknown

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 30-W: 28

Incident Details:

Patrolman John Francis Kenny, Star # Unknown, aged 33 years, was a 9 year, 11 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 18, 29th Precinct - Warren.

On November 11, 1916, Officer Kenny was struck by a Borden Dairy delivery truck at Monroe Street and Campbell Avenue while on his motorcycle. The truck was driven by E. Weaver of 2708 West Cortez Street..Officer Kenny sustained severe injuries and was transported to Washington Park Hospital located at 60th Street and Vernon Avenue. The impact crushed his right leg so severely that it had to be amputated. He remained in the hospital and died twelve days later on November 23, 1916 from infection. Officer Kenny most likely suffered from an infection in his right leg which ultimately caused his death.

Officer Kenny was waked at his residence located at 4034 West Colorado Avenue (present day Fifth Avenue), his funeral mass was held at Presentation Blessed Virgin Mary Catholic Church located at 734 South Springfield Avenue and he was laid to rest on November 26, 1916 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman John Francis Kenny, born August 15, 1883, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 1, 1906.

Officer Kenny was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the Clan na Gael Guards. He was survived by his wife, Hannah (nee Ford); children: Daniel, James, John, Mary and William; parents: Ann (nee Donahue) and John and siblings: Catherine, Hannah Bride, Lizzie, Mary, Michael, Patrick, William and the late Edward and James.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

On January 11, 2006, Officer Kenny's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Richard J. Keogh

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
08 May 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1538
Incident Date:
27 Sep 1932
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle (Pursuit)
Age:
33
End of Watch:
27 Sep 1932
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
15 Aug 1899
Served:
8 years, 4 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
016 - Jefferson Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-W: 19

Incident Details:

Patrolman Richard J. Keogh, Star #1538, aged 33 years, was an 8 year, 4 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On September 27, 1932, Officer Keogh was attempting to stop a traffic violator at the intersection of Rosedale and Milwaukee Avenues. Another vehicle driven by John Kostak, while driving at a high speed, crashed into Officer Keogh's motorcycle. Officer Keogh sustained serious injuries in the motorcycle accident. He was transported to Belmont Hospital where he died shortly after arriving. Kostak was taken into custody by responding officers.

Officer Keogh was waked at a chapel located at 2114 West Irving Park Road, his funeral mass was held at St. Benedict Parish Church located at 2215 West Irving Park Road and he was laid to rest on September 30, 1932 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Richard J. Keogh, born August 15, 1899, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 8, 1924. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Keogh was survived by his wife, Loretta and two children.

Patrolman Daniel Kleason Keough

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Apr 1891
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
56
End of Watch:
18 Nov 1917
Unit of Assignment:
District 1, 1st Precinct - Central Detail
Date of Birth:
17 Mar 1862
Served:
12 years, 5 months, 22 days*
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Daniel Kleason Keough, Star # Unknown, aged 56 years, was a 12 year, 5 month, 22 day* veteran of the Chicago Police Department, unit of assigned to District 1, 1st Precinct - Central Detail.

In 1916, Officer Keough attempted to arrest some burglars in a saloon located at 33rd Street and Cottage Grove Avenue. During the arrest, Officer Keough was shot in the groin. Keough died at his home approximately one year later on November 18, 1917 from the wounds he sustained during the arrest.

Officer Keough was waked at his residence located at 1030 West Polk Street, his funeral mass was held in Requiem at Holy Family Catholic Church located at 1080 West Roosevelt Road and he was laid to rest on November 21, 1917 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Daniel Kleason Keough, born March 17, 1862, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 4, 1891. He was discharged from the Department on February 25, 1893 and was reinstated on March 22, 1893 with an absence from the Department of 26 days. He was again discharged from the Department on September 30, 1896 and was reinstated on October 31, 1910 with an absence from the Department of 14 years, 1 month and 1 day.

Officer Keough was a member of the St. Patrick’s Council No. 1742 Knights of Columbus. He was survived by his wife, Ellen (nee Hurley); daughter, Helen, mother: Mary and siblings: Catherine Corbett, Margaret, Michael G., Patrick and the late Timothy G.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman John Joseph Keough

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Apr 1908
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2331
Incident Date:
29 Jan 1929
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
55
End of Watch:
31 Jan 1929
Unit of Assignment:
29th District - West Chicago
Date of Birth:
17 Sep 1873
Served:
20 years, 9 months, 29 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman John Joseph Keough, Star #2331, aged 55 years, was a 20 year, 9 month, 29 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 29th District - West Chicago.

On January 29, 1929, Officer Keough was directing traffic at the south approach to the Halsted Street bridge at the intersection of Sangamon Street and Ogden Avenue following a severe snow storm. A truck driver, Frank Monticello, age 27, of 908 West Taylor Street, who had failed to follow the officer’s signals, pulled into the wrong lane of traffic. Officer Keough then ordered him to pull over to the curb and then ran into the street. While walking alongside a different moving truck, he slipped and fell, the rear wheel of the truck passing over his body. The officer sustained two broken legs and severe lung and head injuries. Slippery streets and traffic caused by the storm delayed rescue efforts. Officer Keough was taken to Alexian Brothers Hospital where he lingered for two days. At the hospital, one of Keough's broken legs had to be amputated but the remaining infection caused the officer's death on January 31, 1929.

Frank Monticello was held by police, but no further action was noted against him.

Officer Keough was waked at Martin Brothers Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on February 2, 1929 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman John Joseph Keough, born September 17, 1873, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 2, 1908. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Keough was survived by his wife, Nora and five children.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

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