LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

Checkerboard Band

Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

  • The results are being filtered by the character: L
1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman Michael T. Langan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
25 Oct 1915
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
30 Dec 1929
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
47
End of Watch:
30 Dec 1929
Unit of Assignment:
37th District - Sheffield
Date of Birth:
25 Dec 1882
Served:
14 years, 2 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 21-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Michael T. Langan, Star # Unknown, aged 47 years, was a 14 year, 2 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 37th District - Sheffield.

On December 30, 1929, at 11:45 p.m., Officer Langan while on duty was inside Roy Schwartz’s “Soda Parlor” located at 2745 North Ashland Avenue when he observed four holdup men who, upon entering, posed as police officers. The men then drew revolvers and announced a robbery. Langan was in civilian clothes and knew the bandits were not fellow officers. Officer Langan cut his conversation short with Mr. Schwartz as he observed the fake badges and guns the bandits were brandishing. In an attempt to frustrate the robbery, Langan approached the men as they backed up into a cluster near the door. Before Langan could fully draw his weapon the bandits fired on him. He was struck three times before firing his gun once then collapsing to the floor. The first bullet struck him in the left ear before passing through his head. The second bullet struck him in the forehead and the third bullet hit his right shoulder before passing through. The bandits then fled the scene dragging one of their accomplices to a waiting car. The bandits then fled in the automobile speeding northbound on Ashland Avenue making good their escape. Sergeant Victor Eck and Detectives John Lagatutti and Frank Patterson were dispatched from the Sheffield Avenue station to the “Soda Parlor.” Upon arrival, the officers rushed Officer Langan to Alexian Brothers Hospital, but Langan died enroute.

Mr. Schwartz, in a statement, stated that Officer Langan must have hit one of the bandits because they were pretty much stationary targets the way they were all bunched up by the door. He also stated that he believed he could identify the four bandits because they were the same ones who had robbed him the month prior of $1,200.00 and shot a different officer who was in the shop.

Early the next morning police were searching the area and discovered the body of John Dillard in the alley behind 1444 North Kedzie Avenue. It was believed that his confederates dumped Dillard there as they fled the scene. There was also speculation that Dillard stepped into the line of his confederates' fire and was shot because it could not be proven that Langan had ever fully drawn his weapon. Dillard was found to be an ex-convict and the only bandit to be identified. He was blamed for Officer Langan’s murder even though that fact could never be substantiated. The other gunmen were never apprehended and are still at large.

Officer Langan was laid to rest on January 4, 1930 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Michael T. Langan, born December 25, 1882, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 25, 1915. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. Officer Langan had returned to duty on the day of his murder after a five-day bout of influenza. Coincidentally he had also been shot months before in a gun battle with another bandit. He was also severely beaten three years before during a riot at the Lincoln Turner Hall located at Diversey Parkway and Lincoln Avenue.

Officer Langan was survived by his wife, Lily.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #10465.

Patrolman Charles C. P. Larsen

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
25 Oct 1915
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4830
Incident Date:
11 May 1917
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
13 May 1917
Unit of Assignment:
District 20, 33rd Precinct - Rawson
Date of Birth:
27 Nov 1887
Served:
1 year, 6 months, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
014 - Shakespeare

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olive Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 2
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 49
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-E: 11

Incident Details:

Patrolman Charles C. P. Larsen, Star #4830, aged 29 years, was a 1 year, 6 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 20, 33rd Precinct - Rawson.

On May 11, 1917, at 1:05 a.m., Officer Larsen, while on patrol, discovered two burglars in the act of forcing open the basement door to the Star Theatre located at 1447 North Milwaukee Avenue. Officer Larson climbed down the dimly lit basement stairs and confronted the burglars. He ordered them to move away from the door and began questioning them. One of them opened fire, striking Officer Larsen in the arm. This gave the burglars enough time to slip by the officer and flee up the stairs. Officer Larsen gave chase and drew his service revolver. He fired on the two fleeing felons and wounded one. The gunmen returned fire as they fled and at North Avenue and Wood Street Officer Larsen was struck three times, hitting him in the cheek, chest and arm. It was at this time he received his mortal wound, the bullet penetrating his lung, collapsing to the ground. Officer Larsen was found by responding officers and taken to St. Elizabeth Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds two days later on May 13, 1917 from a septic infection.

Before Officer Larson’s death, a suspect by the name of Edward Schieve was arrested and identified by Larsen as one of the shooters. Schieve denied this but admitted to being at the Star Theatre that night. Schieve offered to name the offenders, but it is unknown if any arrests were made. The assailants were unknown and are still at large as of January 1918. It was believed that one of the offenders may have been a participant in the “film operators” war.

Officer Larsen was waked at his residence located at 4834 West Cornelia Avenue was laid to rest on May 17, 1917 in Mount Olive Cemetery, 3800 North Narragansett Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Charles C. P. Larsen, born November 27, 1887, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 25, 1915. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Larsen was survived by his wife and two children.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Casper Lauer

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
Mar 1851
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
A1
Incident Date:
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Stabbed
Age:
34
End of Watch:
18 Sep 1854
Unit of Assignment:
Town of Chicago - 2nd Ward
Date of Birth:
08 Mar 1820
Served:
3 years, 6 months*
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Boniface Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 1
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4-E: 14

Incident Details:

Constable of Police Casper Lauer, Star #A/1, aged 34 years, was a 5 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, elected to the Town of Chicago - 2nd Ward.

On September 18, 1854, Constable Casper Lauer had located and detained a man, Patrick Cunningham, that had been wanted for a domestic abuse case involving the man's elderly parents. While transporting his prisoner to the police station, a struggle ensued at Jackson Street and Edina Place (present day Plymouth Court). The offender produced a knife and stabbed officer Lauer in the abdomen. Officer Lauer returned two blows to the offender’s head with his baton, causing the man to fall to the ground. After flagging a passing wagon down and securing the prisoner, Officer Lauer transported himself to the nearest drug store where he succumbed to his wound shortly thereafter.

Patrick Cunningham was arrested and stood trial. On January 21, 1855, he was found guilty, convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to eight years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Alton. His sentence was the maximum allowable at the time. On June 9, 1858, he was transferred to the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Cunningham’s sister, Mary, began petitioning Illinois Governor John Wood to pardon her brother. In addition to his sister, the prosecutors of the case, the trial judge, the warden of the Illinois State Penitentiary at Alton, and Attorney Abraham Lincoln also sent petitions seeking Cunningham’s release. On August 8, 1860, Patrick Cunningham was pardoned by Governor Wood after serving almost six years of hi sentence.

Constable Lauer's funeral mass was held in Requiem at St. Peter Church and he was laid to rest in St. Boniface Cemetery, 4901 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Section A, Block 7, Lot 27.

Constable of Police Casper Lauer, born March 8, 1820, was elected in March 1851 and served from 1851 through 1853. He was then appointed as a day policeman on April 7, 1853. He served as a volunteer for the Chicago Fire Department prior to being elected a constable.

Constable Lauer was survived by his wife, Eva L. (nee Oehmen); sons: Nickolas Aloysius, age 3 and Joseph E., born in 1854 and brother, John (CPD).

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman Emmett Dennis Laughlin

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
11 Feb 1929
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
406
Incident Date:
19 Aug 1939
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
39
End of Watch:
25 Aug 1939
Unit of Assignment:
22nd District - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
18 Aug 1900
Served:
10 years, 6 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Emmett Dennis Laughlin, Star #406, aged 39 years, was a 10 year, 6 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 22nd District - Maxwell.

On August 19, 1939, Officer Laughlin, along with two other officers, were responding to a call when their vehicle collided with another car at the intersection of 14th Place and Union Avenue. Patrolman Laughlin suffered a fractured skull in the accident and succumbed to his injuries at Mother Cabrini Hospital six days later on August 25, 1939.

The driver of the vehicle, Charles Moore, who caused the crash was charged with reckless driving, failure to yield to a police car, and driving without lights.

Officer Laughlin was waked at his residence located at 5516 West Monroe Street, his funeral mass was held at Resurrection Church located at 7201 South Carpenter Street and he was laid to rest on August 29, 1939 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road #4, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Emmett Dennis Laughlin, born August 18, 1900, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 11, 1929.

Officer Laughlin was survived by his wife, Esther Elizabeth (nee Ireland); son, Dennis J. (CPD); mother Katherine (nee Grady) and siblings: Frank and Julia Moran.

On March 9, 1960, Detective Laughlin's son, Patrolman Dennis J. Laughlin, was also killed in the performance of duty while serving with the Chicago Police Department.

Patrolman Edward C. Leach

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Dec 1896
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2766
Incident Date:
10 Feb 1899
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly
Age:
45
End of Watch:
10 Feb 1899
Unit of Assignment:
District 4, 11th Precinct - Fiftieth Street
Date of Birth:
13 Nov 1853
Served:
2 years, 1 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 29
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4-E: 9

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward C. Leach, Star #2766, aged 45 years, was a 2 year, 1 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 4, 11th Precinct - Fiftieth Street.

On February 10, 1899, Officer Leach and Patrolman Patrick Furlong had just finished their tours of duty at midnight. They went to William Wagner’s Saloon located in the 6000 block of South State Street. While in the saloon the two men became involved in an argument. Officer Leach, an Englishman, and Officer Furlong, an Irishman, began to argue about the Boer War. The argument became heated and both men drew their revolvers. Officer Furlong fired his and shot Officer Leach twice. Officer Leach was taken to Englewood Union Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries the same day.

Officer Patrick Furlong was arrested, tried and found guilty of murder. On May 17, 1899, he was sentenced to 14 years in Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. On December 22, 1900, he was pardoned by Governor John Tanner.

Officer Leach was waked at his residence located at 4940 South Wentworth Avenue was laid to rest on February 13, 1899 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Edward C. Leach, November 13, 1853, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 14, 1896.

Officer Leach was survived by his wife, Letitia; siblings: Annie, Ettie, John, Mary A. and Symthia.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2821.

Patrolman Eric Dwayne Lee

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Dec 1991
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
16947
Incident Date:
19 Aug 2001
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
19 Aug 2001
Unit of Assignment:
7th District - Englewood
Date of Birth:
11 Oct 1963
Served:
9 years, 8 months, 4 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
007 - Englewood

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 32
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5-E: 22

Incident Details:

Patrolman Eric Dwayne Lee, Star #16947, aged 37 years, was a 9 year, 8 month, 4 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 7th District - Englewood Tactical Unit.

On August 19, 2001, at 9:15 p.m., Officer Lee and his partner, Patrolman Andre Green, age 38, were on duty. They received a call from three narcotics officer requesting assistance for drug surveillance. The officers met up in an alley on the 6300 block of South Carpenter Street. While in the alley, Officer Green observed a fight-taking place at the north end of the alley. He alerted his partner and the officers along with Patrolman Vince Barner, of narcotics, began to walk towards the disturbance.

The fight began when Lamar Logan relieved himself on a garbage can behind the home of Aloysius Oliver, age 26. Oliver, a gang member and convicted felon, confronted Logan with his cohorts, Tommie Leach, age 24, and a third man. They began to kick Logan as he lay on the ground. The officers, dressed in civilian clothing with their badges hanging from a chain around their necks, approached the two men. The officers yelled "Police," at three men who were beating Logan and as they approached one of Oliver’s accomplices looked up and said the cops are coming. Oliver replied, “Fuck the cops.” Oliver’s accomplices began making their case to the officers about why they were beating Logan. Oliver wasn’t talking and was standing there with one hand in his pocket. Officer Barner noticed this and said, “Hey man, take your hand out of your pocket.” Oliver removed his hand from his pocket and produced a .357 caliber Ruger GP-100 revolver. Almost instantaneously the men scattered and Oliver and Leach fled on foot eastbound into a gangway. Officer Barner immediately took off and ran through a gangway immediately to his right, thinking he would cut them off in at the next alley. Officers Lee and Green ran for cover behind one of the garages. Shocked at what just occurred Officers Lee and Green regrouped and stepped into the alley again in search of Oliver. Shortly thereafter Oliver stepped back into the alley. He had been waiting behind the garage. Oliver raised his gun and fired twice at the officers. Officer Lee was struck twice; one round striking him in his right temple and the other grazing his ear. He then collapsed face down onto the pavement mortally wounded.

Oliver then fled eastbound on foot after firing through a gangway. As the shooting was taking place, Officer Barner had located Leach and confronted him in a gangway. Leach produced a gun and pointed it at Officer Barner and fled eastbound again on foot. Hearing the Oliver’s gunfire, Officer Leach turned and almost instantly Oliver was within one arms length with his gun raised. The two men struggled and Oliver's gun discharged but the shot did not hit anyone. Officer Barner was able to take Oliver into custody shortly after without further incident. An ambulance was summoned and Officer Lee was rushed to Christ Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries shortly after arriving.

Oliver’s .357 caliber Ruger GP-100 revolver was recovered. Further investigation revealed the guns serial number to match one that was reported stolen. On March 7, 2001, Matthew Everts, age 32, of Merton Wisconsin reported the gun stolen from his home. Everts told police he noticed the gun missing from a closet on February 15th. He believed the revolver was taken between January 1st and February 15th.

Several suspects were apprehended and held for questioning. Tommie Leach was eventually identified and arrested. He was charged with Aggravated Assault and held on a $150,000.00 bond. The shooter, Aloysius Oliver, was charged with 1st degree murder. Oliver gave a videotaped confession saying he decided to beat up the man because in the alley because he was urinating on his fence. Oliver also said he told his girlfriend to send out two friends to help attack the man. However, other witnesses told police the actual motive was that Oliver believed the man stole Oliver's pit bull from his back yard. On January 23, 2004, Oliver was found guilty of 1st degree murder. Oliver had previously been convicted of robbery and aggravated battery in 1993, and of possession of a firearm by a felon in 1998. During the shooting, Oliver was on parole for his 1998 conviction. On September 17, 2004, he was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. On November 22, 2005, following many continuances, the Cook County Criminal Court judge denied Oliver's motions for a new trial.

Officer Lee was waked at Leak & Sons Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Salem Baptist Church and he was laid to rest on August 24, 2001 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Police Officer Eric Dwayne Lee, born October 11, 1963, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 16, 1991. He earned 20 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Lee served in the U.S. Marine Corps for four years and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Corporal. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Lee was survived by his wife, Shawn S. (nee Tinnelle); daughter, Erica, age 6; parents: Anna (nee Bates) and Bobby and siblings: Mark, Michelle (Damien) and Steven.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #G495183.

On November 20, 2001, Officer Lee's star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Lee's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby. Patrolman James H. Camp's star was the last star to be enshrined in the Chicago Police Headquarters building located at 1121 South State Street.

Sergeant Otha Mac LeMons

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
03 Apr 1950
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1048
Incident Date:
05 Aug 1974
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
54
End of Watch:
05 Aug 1974
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Kensington
Date of Birth:
26 Feb 1920
Served:
24 years, 4 months, 2 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 29
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 47-E: 9

Incident Details:

Sergeant Otha Mac LeMons, Star #1048, aged 54 years, was a 24 year, 4 month, 2 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Kensington.

On August 5, 1974, at 1:00 a.m., Sergeant LeMons was off duty and in Pepsi's Lounge located at 62 East 103rd Street when an armed robbery occurred. Three members of the Duck Town Stones, a faction of the Black P Stone Nation, entered the lounge with guns drawn. The sergeant identified himself as a police officer and drew his weapon when two of the offenders opened fire and shot him six times. The robbers then fled the scene in a tan 1970 Buick Electra without license plates and made good their escape, not before taking a large amount of money from the lounge. Sergeant LeMons was transported to Roseland Community Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival at 1:11 p.m. on August 5, 1974.

One of the robber’s fingerprints was lifted on the bar and descriptions of the robbers were obtained by six witnesses to the shooting. Willie “Will Kill” Jefferson, Jr., age 23, of 8930 South Justine Avenue, was identified as Sergeant LeMons’ killer two days later. Jefferson was no stranger to murder. He was arrested on March 11, 1974 for the murder of Earl Harold Daniels, age 13, but was discharged on April 11, 1974 by Judge Wayne Olson for no probable cause. Also identified as an accomplice, in a juvenile petition, was Larry Collins, age 16 and Kenneth Tompkins, age 22, of 6038 South Morgan Street. Collins, Jefferson and Tompkins were eventually apprehended.

Willie Jefferson was charged with the murder and four counts of armed robbery. Larry Collins was sent to juvenile detention on three counts of armed robbery and the sergeant's murder. Kenneth Tompkins was charged with murder.

Pepsi’s Lounge was owned by Arthur Hadley, Sergeant LeMons’ uncle. It was robbed three weeks prior to the incident. Sergeant LeMons had been stopping there on his off hours to check up on the place.

Sergeant LeMons was waked at A. A. Raynor & Sons Funeral Home located at 318 East 71st Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Columbanus Church located at 331 East 71st Street and was laid to rest on August 8, 1974 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Sergeant Otha Mac LeMons, born February 26, 1920, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 3, 1950. He was promoted to Sergeant in 1972.

Sergeant LeMons served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of World War II and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Verdun Christine (nee Whitaker), age 55; daughter, Babette Davis; mother, Anna (nee Watherspoon) and grandchildren: Byron and Monet.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #P366000.

Detective Sergeant Bernard J. Lenehan Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Mar 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
536
Incident Date:
03 Oct 1919
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
44
End of Watch:
05 Oct 1919
Unit of Assignment:
District 15, 20th Precinct - Fillmore
Date of Birth:
04 Feb 1875
Served:
13 years, 6 months, 13 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 58
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-E: 13

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant Bernard J. Lenehan, Sr., Star #536, aged 44 years, was a 13 year, 6 month, 13 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 15, 20th Precinct - Fillmore.

On October 3, 1919, at 12:57 a.m., Detective Sergeant Lenehan and Detective Sergeant George C. Burns were on duty inside Mulhern's Saloon located at 3301 West Madison Street. The two officers were speaking with the bartender, Eugene Morrissey, and had only been inside the saloon for a few minutes when two men entered through a side door. The men came in wearing handkerchiefs over their faces and with their guns drawn. One of the bandits then struck a patron, Vernon Lambert of 2517 South Millard Avenue, on the knee with their gun and ordered him to hold up his hands. This caused Lambert to scream drawing the attention of the officers. They turned to see what the commotion was about and were recognized by the bandits as police. The bandits immediately opened fire as both officers reached for their weapons. Before Sergeant Burns could draw his service revolver he was struck four times in the abdomen and side. He was able to return fire as he ran after one bandit to the rear of the saloon before he slipped out a back door to the alley. Sergeant Lenehan in the meantime struggled with the other bandit and was shot in the forehead, at close range, as he attempted to restrain the robber. Despite being shot in the head, he continued to struggle with the bandit, the fight moving out the side door to the sidewalk. It was here that Sergeant Lenehan fell unconscious from loss of blood. The robbers then fled the scene to a waiting auto occupied a driver and another man. The flivver sped off driving South on Spaulding Avenue then turning west onto Van Buren Street and disappearing. Sergeant Burns was taken to Garfield Park Hospital where he died a half hour after arriving. Sergeant Lenehan was taken to St. Anthony Hospital where he lingered for two days before succumbing to his wounds on October 5, 1919.

Detectives investigating the shooting combed the city for the owner of a hat that was recovered at the scene. The hat had a trademark “Gus the Square Hatter.” In addition to the hat, police recovered a white handkerchief and a.38 caliber blue steel Smith and Wesson revolver, serial #22560, at the scene. The serial number was made public in the hope that a previous owner would step forward and provide a clue as to the owner. Description of the holdup men were also put out as 35-years-old, one being about 5’10” tall with dark hair and a smooth face and the other slightly shorter with light brown hair and a clear complexion. A reward of $1,500, collected by fellow detectives was offered for any information leading to the arrest of the bandits.

One of the bandits involved was tentatively identified as John Kristoveck, a left handed shooter, after he shot and killed Sergeant Edward W. Marpool on October 26, 1920. The second gunman remains unknown and is still at large.

Sergeant Lenehan was waked at his residence located at 4055 West Grenshaw Street and he was laid to rest in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant Bernard J. Lenehan, Sr., born February 4, 1875, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 22, 1906. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Sergeant Lenehan was survived by his wife, Delia and children: Catherine, Bernard J., Jr., Helen and John.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #4318.

Patrolman Earl K. Leonard

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
30 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4558
Incident Date:
09 Jun 1929
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
31
End of Watch:
09 Jun 1929
Unit of Assignment:
25th District - Fillmore
Date of Birth:
10 Apr 1898
Served:
6 years, 7 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
015 - Austin

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Woodlawn Cemetery - Forest Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-12
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 25
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 15-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Earl K. Leonard, Star #4558, aged 31 years, was a 6 year, 7 month, 10 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 25th District - Fillmore.

On June 9, 1929, at 10:15 p.m., Patrolman Leonard, while on motorcycle duty, stopped a traffic violator at 5411 West Quincy Street. John Bartoli, driver of the car, had failed to stop for a red light at Madison Street and Laramie Avenue. Bartoli’s car was occupied by nine passengers, four women and five men, and they watched as Officer Leonard placed John Bartoli in custody. After cuffing the arrestee, Leonard began to walk northbound on Lotus Avenue from Quincy Street with Bartoli. He was going to a nearby patrol box at Lotus Avenue and Monroe Street to call for a patrol wagon to transport Bartoli to the station. It was at this time a male passenger, Patrick Joyce, alias Patrick Doyle, of 3906 West Flournoy Street, not liking the fact that his friend was under arrest, produced a revolver from under the car seat. To the surprise of the other passengers, Joyce said “One bullet will finish that copper.” The occupants of the car tried to dissuade him from exiting the car. When that didn’t work, the occupants, attempted to physically hold him back. However, their efforts did not work and Joyce broke free running to catch up with his friend and Officer Leonard. Just as the two reached the patrol box, Joyce caught up with them, just feet away, and fired the gun at Officer Leonard. The bullet struck Officer Leonard in his right temple causing him to collapse to the ground. Joyce and Bartoli then made good their escape.

Word quickly spread to almost every officer in the city after news of Officer Leonard’s shooting was broadcast by the Tribune-owned WGN radio. Several Detective squads responded to the scene and discovered an unconscious Leonard laying on the ground. He was rushed to Francis Willard Hospital where he died a short time later never regaining consciousness.

Investigators at the scene found an abandoned vehicle and were able to determine that the vehicle was a rental; rented by Elmer Wolff of 111 South Campbell Street. Elmer Wolff was located by investigators and stated that he had borrowed the car to Patrick Joyce. In a separate statement made by Karen Patten, she related that all those involved had been at her Westside home. They all left to take one of the female passenger’s home on Quincy Street near Lotus Avenue at the same place Leonard made the traffic stop. As the disjointed information came in, it led investigators to look into Joyce's past. He had a long rap sheet that included multiple robbery charges even though he had only spent six months in total in Bridewell Prison. On February 15, 1927, Joyce was acquitted of a robbery charge by Judge Emanuel Eller. On February 16, two other charges were dismissed. On February 1, 1928, Joyce was convicted of a robbery before Judge Eller and sentenced to six months in Bridewell prison. It was said that Joyce had political connections which helped him win his release from prison on probation after one of his robbery arrests.

On June 10, 1929, Joyce's mother, Mary Joyce, and brother, James Joyce, were located and brought in for questioning and on the same day the arrest of all occupants of the auto was recommended by the Coroner. Those arrested shortly after the shooting were: Bridget Cavallo, age 20 of 5411 West Quincy Street; William Mullen, age 21 of 2548 West Congress Street; John "Red" O'Keefe, age 22 of 4150 West Washington Boulevard; Albert Patten, age 21 of 323 North Sacramento Boulevard; Eleanor Patten, age 18 of 323 North Sacramento Boulevard; Katherine Patten, age 17 of 323 North Sacramento Boulevard; Helen Tindall, age 18 of 2038 West Washington Boulevard and Elmer Wolff of 111 South Campbell Avenue. Wolff was the only person not in the vehicle at the time of the traffic stop. Joyce and Bertoli were the only two remaining at large.

On June 14, 1929, Joyce was apprehended and indicted. On June 16, 1929, Mrs. Mary Lemon who gave Joyce refuge was booked as an accessory. On June 19, 1929, Lemon was discharged by Judge Jonas. Patrick Joyce stood trial and was found guilty. On August 9, 1929, Joyce was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Comerford.

John Bartoli wasn’t apprehended for two years. On October 28, 1931, John Bartoli was arrested in Moberly, Missouri and the Chicago Police Department was notified of the arrest. On November 3, 1931, a telegram was sent to Chief of Police Sam Sparkman of Moberly to release Bartoli because the State's Attorney did not have sufficient evidence to warrant a conviction. The Bartoli case was stricken off the record on March 29, 1934.

Officer Leonard was waked at Hursen Undertakers Funeral Home located at 2346 West Madison Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at the funeral home and he was laid to rest on June 13, 1929 in Woodlawn Cemetery, 7750 Cermak Road, Forest Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Earl K. Leonard, born April 10, 1896, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 30, 1922. He earned 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $240.00 during his career. One year prior to his murder, Officer Leonard and Patrolman Walter Franks shot and killed an armed offender during a restaurant holdup. The robber had also been a participant in a $133,000.00 Evergreen park mail robbery.

Officer Leonard was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his mother, Dolores E.; and siblings: Morel Leonard, Mrs. H. Wildman and Vera.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #10452.

Police Officer Clifton Pimpleton Lewis IV

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
28 Apr 2003
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4103
Incident Date:
29 Dec 2011
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
41
End of Watch:
29 Dec 2011
Unit of Assignment:
15th District - Austin
Date of Birth:
05 May 1970
Served:
8 years, 8 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
025 - Grand Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery - Glenwood, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 19-W: 15

Incident Details:

Police Officer Clifton Pimpleton Lewis, IV, Star #4103, aged 41 years, was an 8 year, 8 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 15th District - Austin Tactical Unit.

On December 29, 2011, at approximately 8:30 p.m., Officer Clifton was fatally wounded during a robbery at the M&M Quick Foods store located at 1201 North Austin Boulevard. He was working an overtime security detail at the store, which had been robbed several weeks earlier, when Tyrone Clay, age 29, and Edgardo Colon, age 34, entered. The two men entered and announced a robbery. Officer Lewis drew his weapon and fired at the men. Colon returned fire and shot Officer Lewis multiple times in the abdomen and three times in the back before grabbing his service weapon and badge and fleeing the store. Clay took about $670.00 from the cash register before he fled the store. Officer Lewis was transported to Stroger Hospital of Cook County where he was pronounced dead at 9:08 p.m. on December 29, 2011.

Tyrone Clay and Edgardo Colon were later arrested and charged with 1st degree murder. They were ordered held without bond.

Officer Lewis was waked at United Missionary Baptist Church, his funeral mass was also held at United Missionary Baptist Church and he was laid to rest on January 5, 2012 in Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery, 18301 South Glenwood Thornton Road, Glenwood, Illinois.

Police Officer Lewis Pimpleton Clifton, IV, born May 5, 1970, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 28, 2003 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 4 Department Commendations, 1 Unit Meritorious Award, 70 Honorable Mentions, the 2009 Crime Reduction Award, the 2004 Crime Reduction Award and 2 Complimentary Letters during his career. Officer Lewis worked in the 8th District, 11th District and the 15th District.

Officer Lewis was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his fiancée, Tamara Latrice Tucker; daughter, Simone Gabrielle Lewis, age 11; parents: Clifton Pimpleton, III., age 64 and Maxine Malesha Hooks (nee Johnson), age 64 and sister, Nicole Olloway.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HT652264.

Detective Walter E. Lilly

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Sep 1926
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5615
Incident Date:
28 Feb 1928
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
28 Feb 1928
Unit of Assignment:
17th District - New City
Date of Birth:
08 Jul 1895
Served:
1 year, 5 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Hope Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-11
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 53-E: 9

Incident Details:

Detective Walter E. Lilly, Star #5615, aged 32 years, was a 1 year, 5 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 17th District - New City, detailed to a Detective Bureau - Ford Squad.

On February 28, 1928, at 12:25 a.m., Detective Lilly was off duty and working in a parking garage located at 458 West 79th Street. The garage was a block away from where he lived. While parking his car in the garage, in the rear of the above location, two men approached and announced an armed robbery. Unaware that Lilly was a police officer; the men pulled out weapons and demanded Lilly’s valuables. Lilly attempted to frustrate the robbery when he attempted to draw his service revolver. The men fired their weapons before Lilly could fully draw. Detective Lilly was struck and fell to the sidewalk mortally wounded. Although he was wounded, he continued to fire at the men as they ran down 79th Street, unloading almost a dozen rounds from the two guns he carried. Detective Lilly was taken to Auburn Park Hospital where died a half hour later.

Before Detective Lilly passed away, he was able to give a description of the offenders. He said that one of the men was wearing a leather jacket. He also believed that he had wounded one of the men as they fled. Detective Lilly also stated that he remembered seeing the men hail a westbound taxicab before he collapsed to the sidewalk. The assailants were never identified and are still at large.

Detective Lilly’s wife of two years, Lorraine, heard the gunfire exchanged between her husband and the bandits as the murder scene was less than a block from their home.

Detective Lilly’s funeral mass was held at his sister’s residence located at 7218 South Emerald Avenue and he was laid to rest on March 1, 1928 in Mount Hope Cemetery, 11500 South Fairfield Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Detective Walter E. Lilly, born July 8, 1895, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 14, 1926. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Detective Lilly was survived by his wife, Lorraine; parents: Mr. and Mrs. Allan Lilly and sister, Mrs. Lowell Butler.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #10411.

Detective Dewey Levis Littleton

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Aug 1935
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6884
Incident Date:
13 Aug 1947
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly
Age:
43
End of Watch:
13 Aug 1947
Unit of Assignment:
4th District - Stanton
Date of Birth:
07 Feb 1904
Served:
11 years, 11 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 45
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 37-E: 9

Incident Details:

Detective Dewey Levis Littleton, Star #6884, aged 43 years, was an 11 year, 11 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th District - Stanton.

On August 13, 1947, at approximately 10:43 p.m., Detective Littleton along with Detectives John Blyth, Michael Egan and Milburn Wallace responded to a call of Domestic Disturbance at 3247 South Wentworth Avenue. Otis Williams, age 45, had shot his wife Callie, age 43, twice in their second floor apartment. She then was able to escape and run down stairs to a neighbor who called the police. Mr. Williams had been drinking for most of the evening and went into a rage at the point he shot his wife. As the detectives arrived on scene, Detective Littleton in the lead, they climbed the stairs to the apartment. Littleton observed Mr. Williams standing in the doorway on the second floor landing and motioned to the other detectives to keep their distance. Shortly after warning his partners to keep back, Mr. Williams opened fire on the detectives. A gunfight ensued and Detective Littleton was shot in the stomach. He succumbed to his wound shortly thereafter and it was later learned that three shotgun pellets are what led to his death.

Detectives Blyth, Egan and Wallace returned fire but Williams was able to take cover back inside the apartment’s living room. Detectives Blyth and Wallace maintained their position in the apartment’s doorway attempting to draw Williams out while Detective Egan ran downstairs and fired a can of tear gas through the front window of the apartment. By this time additional officers had responded to the scene and began to set up search lights. Responding officers and Williams continued to exchange gunfire shattering the building’s windows. Inside, Blyth and Wallace also continued to exchange gunfire with Williams as they attempted to convince him to surrender. During the gunfight, Williams left his cover and attempted to cross the living room. It was at this time Detective Blyth took advantage of this and fired two shotgun blasts at Williams. The blasts were direct hits, which killed Williams instantly and ended the standoff.

By the end of the standoff over 35 policemen were on scene and over 3,000 spectators had gathered to watch. Mrs. Williams later recovered at Michael Reese Hospital.

At the time of the incident it was reported that Detective Littleton was shot and killed by Mr. Williams. Chief of Detectives Storms divulged, 15 days after the incident that Littleton was shot by accident by Detective Michael Egan. Detective Littleton, along with Detective John Blyth, was on the second floor landing at the time of the shooting. Detective Littleton sighting Williams behind a door thrust Officer Blyth backwards to get him out of the line of fire. Officer Blyth, when he stepped back, bumped into Detective Egan. It was at this point when Egan, who was holding his shotgun, pointed upward, stumbled and accidentally fired, the full blast striking Littleton in the stomach. This information came about at the Coroner's Inquest, held on August 29, 1947, and as Detective Egan listened to the opening session he only then began to realize that it must have been the blast from his shotgun which killed Detective Littleton. It was reported that after Detective Egan determined that his shot killed Littleton, he collapsed. Detective Egan was transferred to the Confidence Detail and Chief Storms said he thought it would be some time before Egan was back with the Bureau Squad.

Police Commissioner Prendergast said that he did not believe there had been any attempt to cover up the shooting, and ascribed the time lapse in information to oversight or negligence. He said the police knew within 48 hours after the gun battle that Egan had shot Littleton accidentally. He said he supposed that Chief Storms "wanted to make sure before telling reporters."

Dr. Jerry Kearns performed a post mortem on Littleton and testified at the inquest on August 15, 1947 that Littleton was killed by three shotgun pellets. As Williams had a revolver, but no shotgun, it became apparent at that time that Littleton could not have been shot by Williams. Deputy Coroner Eugene Ingles continued the Inquest at that time until 10:00 a.m. in the county morgue.

Tragically, Detective John Blyth would also be killed in the line of duty just over 9 years after this incident on June 16, 1956.

Officer Littleton's funeral mass was held at South Shore Baptist Church located at 6028 South Champlain Avenue and he was laid to rest on August 18, 1947 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Detective Dewey Levis Littleton, born February 7, 1904, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 16, 1935. He was a Squad Leader at the time of his death.

Detective Littleton was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Ruth S.; and daughters, Ismay, age 12 and Emalda, age 16.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department Central Complaint Room No. 31184 and Station Complaint No. 781095.

Park Policeman Thomas Locashio

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
184
Incident Date:
08 Sep 1930
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
32
End of Watch:
09 Sep 1930
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
13 Apr 1898
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 28
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 17-E: 14

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Thomas Locashio, Star #184, aged 32 years, was a veteran of the West Park Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On September 8, 1930, Officer Locashio was on duty and riding his police motorcycle on Lake Shore Drive. The officer was traveling Southbound on the city’s Outer Drive extension (present day Lake Shore Drive) when he struck a vehicle driving Westbound onto the outer extension at Barry Avenue. The auto was being driven by Charles Goldstein, age 17, of 5136 West Irving Park Road. Officer Locashio was thrown from the motorcycle and severely injured. He was transported to Columbus Memorial Hospital. After being examined it was determined by doctors that he had a broken neck, fractured skull and serious internal injuries. Officer Locashio lingered in the hospital until he succumbed to his injuries the next day on September 9, 1930.

Officer Locashio was waked at a chapel located at 2701 North Clark Street, his funeral mass was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest on September 12, 1930 in St. Boniface Cemetery, 4901 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois. His remains were moved the following month to Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Park Policeman Thomas Locashio was born on April 30, 1898.

Officer Locashio was survived by his wife, Lucille (nee Turk); two children; mother, Virginia (nee Gremia) and siblings: Ester, Philip and the late Angeline.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The West Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Four park District police departments, Irving, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the West Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Terrence Emmett Loftus

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Oct 1961
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5701
Incident Date:
10 Oct 1976
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
36
End of Watch:
12 Oct 1976
Unit of Assignment:
14th District - Shakespeare
Date of Birth:
20 Jan 1940
Served:
15 years, 5 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
014 - Shakespeare

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 9
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 14-W: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman Terrence Emmett Loftus, Star #5701, aged 36 years, was a 15 year, 5 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 14th District - Shakespeare Tactical Unit.

On October 10, 1976, at 1:53 a.m., Officer Loftus was driving home from work when he witnessed two rival gangs fighting, the Gaylords and the Lawndale Imperial Gangsters. The Officer exited his vehicle near Central Park and Fullerton Avenues, announced his office and attempted to separate the gang members. Several members of a rival gang were having a party in a club across the street at 3559 West Fullerton Avenue and when they saw what was happening they all came out of the club. Just as an on duty police officer arrived, multiple gunshots rang out and Officer Loftus was struck in the right cheek and the bullet severed his spinal cord and exited out of his neck. He was rushed to St. Elizabeth's Hospital where it was learned that he sustained severe brain damage and was being kept on life support. He remained in a coma and died two days later and was pronounced dead at 5:25 p.m. on October 12, 1976.

Ronnie L. Carasquillo, age 18, of 3050 West Belmont Avenue, a known Imperial Lawndale Gangster, was arrested. He was charged with attempt murder and aggravated battery. On October 12, 1976, his charges were amended to murder. On January 17, 1978, Carasquillo was found guilty and sentenced to 200 to 600 years in prison plus 5 years of parole by Judge Wilson. In October 2008 and November 2010 Carasquillo became eligible for parole and was denied. On November 13, 2013, Carasquillo again became eligible for parole. On November 22, 2013 the Illinois Prisoner Review Board denied his parole. The vote was 12 against parole and 2 for parole.

Officer Loftus was waked at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home located at 6150 North Cicero Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady Mother of the Church located at 8747 West Lawrence Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 15, 1976 in All Saints Catholic Cemetery, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Patrolman Terrence Emmett Loftus, born January 20, 1940, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 9, 1961.

Officer Loftus was survived by his wife, Carol Ann (nee Wendt), age 34.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #X388613.

Patrolman James F. Looney

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Mar 1911
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
821
Incident Date:
05 Apr 1918
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
01 May 1918
Unit of Assignment:
District 11, 15th Precinct - Thirty-Fifth Street
Date of Birth:
12 May 1879
Served:
7 years, 1 month, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 53
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 6-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman James F. Looney, Star #821, aged 38 years, was a 7 year, 1 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 11, 15th Precinct - Thirty-Fifth Street.

On April 5, 1918, at 10:00 p.m., Officer Looney was on duty leaving a saloon owned by George Hedel located at 1150 West 22nd Street. As he was leaving he observed two suspicious men enter the saloon. Patrolman Looney recognized the men to be robbers and attempted to draw his revolver in an attempt to frustrate a robbery. The bandits opened fire and shot him at close range before he could fully draw his revolver. The bandits then fled the scene making good their escape. Officer Looney was taken to the hospital where he was treated. His wound appeared to be non-life threatening, however the wound became infected and eventually turned gangrenes. He died almost one month after the incident on May 1, 1918.

The gunman were still at large as of January 1919.

Officer Looney was waked at his residence located at 3427 South Marshfield Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 4, 1918 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman James F. Looney, May 12, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 4, 1911.

Officer Looney was survived by his wife, Catherine and three children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #4300.

Park Policeman Robert M. Love

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
80
Incident Date:
09 Apr 1919
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Train
Age:
51
End of Watch:
09 Apr 1919
Unit of Assignment:
Unit of Assignment Unknown
Date of Birth:
01 Jan 1868
Served:
12 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 55
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 37-E: 16

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Robert M. Love, Star #80, aged 51 years, was a 12 year veteran of the West Park Police Department, unit of assignment unknown.

On April 9, 1919, at approximately 9:00 p.m., Officer Love was struck and killed by a Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad train while on patrol at Shedd Park. Officer Love had been posted near 23rd Street and Millard Avenue to investigate complaints from citizens that young boys had been throwing stones in the park and at homes. It is believed that Officer Love was chasing the boys across the tracks and failed to see the oncoming train. A citizen, Harry Tibbets, was passing by when he saw the officer’s cap lying on the ground. He began a search and discovered Officer Love’s body. He then notified the Lawndale Station.

Officer Love was waked at his residence located at 1808 South Ridgway Avenue and he was laid to rest on April 12, 1919 in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Park Policeman Robert M. Love, born January 1, 1865, received his Probationary Appointment to the West Park Police Department in 1907.

Officer Love was a Master Mason. He was survived by his wife and four children.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The West Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Four park district police departments, Irving, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the West Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman John Lucasey

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Oct 1886
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
16 Feb 1904
Cause of Death:
Asphyxiated
Age:
40
End of Watch:
16 Feb 1904
Unit of Assignment:
District 15, 25th Precinct - Lawndale
Date of Birth:
1864
Served:
17 years, 3 months, 29 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Unknown Cemetery
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman John Lucasey, Star # Unknown, aged 40 years, was a 17 year, 3 month, 21 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 15, 25th Precinct - Lawndale.

On February 16, 1904, Officer Lucasey was found dead by Fred Erickson, a conductor, in a small office in the Union Traction Company's Lawndale Car Barn located at 12th Street and 40th Avenue (present day Pulaski Road). A faint odor of illuminating gas was detected in the room, and a post-mortem disclosed symptoms of asphyxiation. Officer Lucasey's body was found one hour after his last report to the station. The cause of Officer Lucasey's death was officially ruled asphyxiation.

On February 27, 1904, Sergeant Maher, Inspector John T. Long and another man were investigating Lucasey’s death when the car barn exploded. Sergeant Maher and Inspector Long were fatally injured in the explosion. Inspector Long died on February 29, 1904 and Sergeant Maher on March 12, 1904. It is unknown if the third man was injured.

The Coroner’s Jury in the Lucasey, Long and Maher cases found that the Union Traction Company had failed to comply with building ordinances.

Patrolman John Lucasey, born in 1864, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 18, 1886.

Officer Lucasey was survived by his wife.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman William “Pinky” Joseph Luce

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Jul 1969
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
14287
Incident Date:
1980-08-27
Cause of Death:
Illness - Cancer (Duty Related)
Age:
45
End of Watch:
14 Aug 1989
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 092 - Special Operations Section
Date of Birth:
17 Jun 1944
Served:
20 years, 1 month, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 44
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 53-W: 20

Incident Details:

Patrolman William "Pinky" Joseph Luce, aged 45 years, was a 20 year, 1 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, and was assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 092 - Special Operations Section.

On August 27, 1980, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., Officer Luce was on duty participating in a field exercise at the Argone National Laboratory located at 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argone, Illinois. He was part of a special training seminar at the Laboratory in conjunction with the Department of Energy Police for the Chicago Police Containment Team. This exercise involved special training with the Multiple Integrated Laser Engagement System (MILES). Two teams consisting of two Lieutenants, six sergeants and eight Patrolmen were sent. Originally Patrolman R. Strom was chosen to attend the exercise. This officer could not attend and Officer Luce was chosen to go in his place. During the training, Officer Luce's scope broke and he was exposed to a small dose of Promethium 147, a radioactive material used in the scope for night vision. Upon leaving the Argone Laboratory several officers, including Officer Luce, set off an alert indicating radioactive contamination. They were subsequently detained, examined and decontaminated. Officer Luce was the only officer in the group to suffer direct contamination to the skin area. He was exposed to radiation from a night vision scope mounted on the M-16 rifle, modified and equipped with an electronic sensor aiming device, he was assigned for the training. The radiation eventually caused severe burns to his face and body. At the time of the incident it was believed that the officers' exposure was very minor and did not constitute a health hazard. However, the exposure was greater than believed and led to the development of cancer in Officer Luce's neck.

On December 7, 1988, Officer Luce began seeing Dr. Michael Goldman for cartoid gland swelling in his neck. Upon obtaining Officer Luce's history of radiation exposure, he was diagnosed with a high grade carcinoma of the right paratoid with metastic disease to the lymph node of the neck. On December 8, 1988, Officer Luce went on the Medical for sickness as a result of his cancer. The same day Officer Luce underwent surgery to remove the tumor. Following the surgery he required radiation therapy to prevent local recurrence of the tumor. Officer Luce was later admitted to Michael Reese Hospital, following a battle with the disease, and was pronounced dead by Dr. Michael E. Gorman at 8:06 p.m. on On October 26, 1989, The Medical Services Director, Paul S. Mesnick, M.D., for the Chicago Police Department changed Officer Luce's medical status from code 3 (sickness) to code 1 (injury on duty). With this change of status, the police department ruled Officer Luce's death in the performance of duty.

The Chicago Police Department Personnel attending the training on August 27, 1989 are as follows: Lieutenants Richard Dwyer and John Seamans #621; Sergeants Richard Braithwaite #2099, James Dolan #1451, John Hennessy, Roy Swanson and Donald Torres; Patrolmen Henry Adema #15078, Frank Amato #15819, Dennis Capetto #13762, William Kaminski #3331, William Luce #14287, Walter Monk #14701, Donald O'Dette #7340 and Ronald Palmer #15652

Officer Luce was waked at Michael Coletta Sons Funeral Home located at 544 West 31st Street, his funeral mass was held at Santa Lucia-Santa Maria Incoronata Parish located at 3022 South Wells Street and he was laid to rest on August 17, 1989 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman William Joseph Luce, born June 17, 1944, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 7, 1969. He had previously served on the Area 4 Task Force, Narcotics Unit and in the Special Operations Group.

Officer Luce served in the Armed Forces, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Luce was survived by his wife, Janet Matilda (nee Condic), age 49; children: Brian Andrew, age 13, Janet Lynn Schuman, age 18, Lisa Britt, age 16, Nickie Sean, age 14, Peter Allen, age 29 and Richard. His son Adam later became a Chicago Police Officer.

Patrolman Jeremiah C. Lucey

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 May 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1831
Incident Date:
06 Feb 1954
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
60
End of Watch:
07 Feb 1954
Unit of Assignment:
32nd District - Shakespeare
Date of Birth:
15 Sep 1893
Served:
29 years, 8 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
014 - Shakespeare

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Queen of Heaven Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 63-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Jeremiah C. Lucey, Star #1831, aged 60 years, was a 29 year, 8 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 32nd District - Shakespeare.

On February 6, 1954, Officer Lucey and his partner, Patrolman Roman C. Steinke, age 42, attempted to serve an arrest warrant for assault with a deadly weapon on James Lee-Fong, owner of a Chinese laundry located at 2705 West Diversey Parkway. Officers Lucey and Steinke entered the laundry with Stephen Malenk, Sr., age 40 of 2619 North California Avenue, who pointed out Lee-Fong, who was alone, as the man who had assaulted him. After being identified, Lee-Fong admitted to slapping the boy. Officer Lucey stated to Lee-Fong “I have warrants for your arrest; you'll have to come to the station.“ Lee asked permission to get his hat and coat in a rear room. Lee-Fong re-appeared a moment later and opened fire with a .38 caliber rifle. Shooting at both the officers and the Malenks, Lee-Fong continued to fire. Mr. Malenks, Sr. was struck first in the chest and upper arm. Officer Lucey was struck in the chest and Officer Steinke struck in several place including his wrist. The officers returned fire and Steinke was able to strike Lee-Fong in the head wounding him. Lee-Fong then fled to the back of the shop. At this time the officers and Malenks exited the shop to the sidewalk in front. Captain Thomas McLaughlin of the Shakespeare station, Supervising Captain Robert E. Ryan and several police squads responded to the laundry a few minutes later.

As the responding officers began arriving on scene they were able to get the wounded medical attention. While Lee-Fong was in the back of the shop he obtained another weapon, a .16 gauge shotgun, and began to shoot at the responding officers as they entered the shop. By this time Lee-Fong had barricaded himself in the laundry and held the 150 responding policemen at bay for 30 minutes. Detectives fired several shots into the store and then surrounded it. When the firing from Lee-Fong stopped, Detectives Edward Cagney and Joseph Corcoran battered down a back door and overpowered Lee as he lay on the floor reaching for a revolver.

Officer Steinkie would later give this account, “When he opened fire, I was knocked down. I crawled out the door and then fired three shots at the gunman. Then I passed out on the sidewalk.“ Officer Lucey had staggered into a grocery next door and collapsed. Malenk ran to a home of a neighbor in the building in which he lived and called police.

Officer Lucey was shot through the liver and died the following day on February 7, 1954 at Alexian Brothers Hospital. Officer Steinke was shot five times: in each hand, neck, right shoulder and abdomen. He succumbed to his wounds seven days later on February 13, 1954 at St. Elizabeth Hospital. Mr. Malenk, Sr. was shot in the chest and right upper arm; he later recovered at Augustina Hospital. Lee was shot two times in the head and died from his wounds April 27, 1954 at Cook County Hospital.

Police were unable to question Lee-Fong at the time of the shooting because of his wounds, but he would later claim that he did not know Steinke and Lucey were police officers but instead thought the plain clothes officers had come into his shop to beat him. The course of events began on February 3, 1954 when Mr. Malenk, Sr. said, “Lee-Fong slapped his son Stephen Malenk, Jr., age 11, in the face after chasing him and another boy for peering thru his store window.“ Lee-Fong also clubbed Malenk, Sr. with a metal pipe, breaking his left arm, and broke two windows in his automobile when he went back to the store with his son to complain. It was at that point Mr. Malenk alerted police and sought a warrant against Lee-Fong at the Shakespeare Avenue court.

Officer Lucey was waked at Conboy Funeral Home located at 4817 West Madison Street, his funeral mass was held at Resurrection Church located at 7201 South Carpenter Street and he was laid to rest on February 10, 1954 in Queen of Heaven Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Jeremiah C. Lucey, born September 15, 1893, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 9, 1924. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $300.00 during his career.

Officer Lucey was a member of the Chicago Patrolman’s Club, Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, Holy Name Society and St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Mary “Molly” (nee O’Brien); children: Gerald P., age 19 and Maureen S., age 11 and brothers: Cornelius and Timothy.

Patrolman Michael E. Lukaszewski

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Nov 1955
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7165
Incident Date:
30 Jun 1957
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
24
End of Watch:
30 Jun 1957
Unit of Assignment:
35th District - East Chicago
Date of Birth:
16 Aug 1932
Served:
1 year, 7 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 3
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 6-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Michael E. Lukaszewski, Star #7165, aged 24 years, was a 1 year, 7 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 35th District - East Chicago.

On June 29, 1957, Officer Lukaszewski and his partner, Patrolman Anthony Concialdi, age 34, were working the squadrol when they responded to a call for a transport at 342 West Chicago Avenue. They met Detectives T. Bell and M. Smith at the above address. The officers took custody of Lavern Jamison, age 32 of 342 West Chicago Avenue, who was intoxicated and homeless. He was placed in custody by the detectives after he threatened to break every window in a nearby hotel. Jamison made this threat after he had a fight with another man inside the hotel over a woman. He had also threatened to beat the man with a bag of bricks. Jamison was transported to the central lockup arriving at approximately 12:45 a.m. on the 11th floor of the Central Police Building located at 1121 South State Street.

Jamison was joined by three other arrestees and they were placed with their backs against the wall across from the lockup keeper’s desk. Officer Lukaszewski was filling out an arrest slip when Jamison lunged from his position on the wall and disarmed Officer Lukaszewski. As some 50 prisoners looked on a scuffle broke out. As they began to struggle, Officer Concialdi turned just in time to see Jamison fire one round. The round struck Officer Lukaszewski in the head and he fell to the floor as Concialdi ran to assist. Jamison fired again and struck Officer Concialdi in his right forearm. Jamison then attempted to flee down the lockup’s west corridor.

Officer Concialdi returned fire, using his six shot revolver, and struck Jamison five times. At this point, two of the lockup keepers had rushed over at the sound of the gunfire. Lockup Keeper George Scholz was able to seize the gun from Jamison as he tried to make good his escape. Officers’ Lukaszewski and Concialdi were rushed to Presbyterian St. Luke Hospital. Officer Lukaszewski died at 5:10 a.m. on June 30, 1957. Officer Concialdi survived the shooting and would recover. Jamison was also taken to Presbyterian St. Luke Hospital where he died at 3:40 a.m. on June 30, 1957.

Investigators learned that Jamison was a registered guest at the hotel where he was arrested. He was registered under the name Lamar Simmons. Jamison’s RAP Sheet contained three arrests for robbery and a disorderly conduct.

Officer Lukaszewski was waked at Kringas and Marzullo Funeral Home located at 5400 West Harrison Street, his funeral mass was held at Precious Blood Church located at 2248 West Washington Boulevard and he was laid to rest on July 5, 1957 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Patrolman Michael E. Lukaszewski, born August 16, 1932, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 16, 1955.

Officer Lukaszewski was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Judy (nee Gallagher); mother: Frances and brother, Joseph. His father in law, a Chicago firefighter, described him as a “hard back“ cop.

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