LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

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1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman Charles A. Paldina

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 May 1919
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
493
Incident Date:
20 Jan 1922
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
20 Jan 1922
Unit of Assignment:
District 16 - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
31 Aug 1887
Served:
2 years, 7 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 6
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 21-W: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman Charles A. Paldina, Star #493, aged 34 years, was a 2 year, 7 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 16 - Maxwell, Detailed to the Detective Division.

On January 20, 1922, at 3:30 p.m., Officer Paldina was on duty and following a lead in search of Edward Neuman, alias Eisenberg, alias Ginsberg, who had been looking for over the past month. He had gone to a saloon located at 901 South Des Plaines Street where it was said Neuman could be found. As he approached the saloon Neuman spotted him and met Officer Paldina in front. Neuman did not give Paldina a chance as he opened fire, shooting through his coat. Despite being struck three times in the stomach Officer Paldina drew his weapon and returned fire, chasing Neuman down the street, as the two exchanged gunfire. Officer Paldina had been able to hit Neuman five times in the back and the chase ended two blocks from the saloon in a passageway at 754 West Taylor Street when Neuman collapsed. Both Officer Paldina and Neuman were taken to Cook County Hospital, both dying en route.

Neuman’s criminal past would be discovered once again at the Cook County Morgue. While at the morgue, Mr. Abe Hubschman, the owner of Star Loan Bank, a pawnshop, identified Neuman as one of five robbers that had stolen $25,000.00 in jewelry several years earlier. Neuman had never been arrested for the crime.

Officer Paldina was waked at his residence located at 619 South Marshfield Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Pompeii Catholic Church located at 1224 West Lexington Street and he was laid to rest on January 24, 1922 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Charles Paldina, born August 31, 1887, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 23, 1919. He earned 4 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $240.00 during his career. Officer Paldina also received a promotion to Temporary Detective Sergeant after clearing up a string of murders in the 19th Ward.

Officer Paldina was a member of Francis Xavier Council No. 1890 Knights of Columbus. He was survived by his wife, Anna (nee Cobleto); children: Frances, age 10, Frank, age 6, Isabel, age 1 and Marie, age 11; father, Francisco and siblings: Angelina and Mary Adolph.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7455.

Sergeant Michael R. Palese

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Sep 1956
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1514
Incident Date:
22 Mar 1977
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Train
Age:
45
End of Watch:
22 Mar 1977
Unit of Assignment:
17th District - Albany Park
Date of Birth:
31 Aug 1931
Served:
20 years, 6 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
017 - Albany Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 32
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 41-E: 16

Incident Details:

Sergeant Michael R. Palese, Star #1514, aged 45 years, was a 20 year, 6 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 17th District - Albany Park.

On March 22, 1977, Sergeant Palese was participating in an emergency plan 2 and was looking for a missing 6 year old girl during a snowstorm. At approximately 9:00 p.m., the girl's parents notified the Chicago Police Department that their child had failed to return home from school. Sergeant Palese noticed holes in a wire fence near Kilbourn Park, a block west of the girl's home at 3453 North Lowell Avenue. Fearing the girl may have been struck by a train, the sergeant went to investigate the area along the train tracks with Patrolman Michael Walsh. Heavy and blowing snow made visibility difficult and while searching the railroad trestle over Roscoe Street at 12:45 a.m. Sergeant Palese was struck by a passing Milwaukee Road commuter train that suddenly emerged from the darkness. The train’s engineer related to investigators that visibility was near zero and that he didn't see the two officers until he was on top of them. He blew his air horns and Officer Walsh yelled for Sergeant Palese to get out of the way, but it was too late. Palese had tried to outrun the train while Officer Walsh jumped over a concrete wall and landed on the embankment.

The girl was located the next morning at 9:15 a.m. by Patrolman Robert Astraus, of the Albany Park Station, when she arrived for class at Scammon Elementary School located at 4201 West Henderson Street.

Sergeant Palese was waked at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home located at 6150 North Cicero Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady of Angels Church located at 3803 West Iowa Street and he was laid to rest on March 25, 1977 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Sergeant Michael R. Palese, born August 31, 1931, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 16, 1956. He earned 48 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Sergeant Palese was a member of the Chicago Police Sergeant's Association, Illinois Police Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his son, Robert, age 16; mother, Josephine Pilas and brother, Robert J. Sergeant Palese was no stranger to tragedy. In December, 1964, tragically Sergeant Palese's son, Robert, at the age of 4 found his service revolver on a kitchen shelf and fatally shot his 18 month old baby sister, Lisa, through the head.

Patrolman Henry L. Peeler

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
17 Oct 1966
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
11174
Incident Date:
05 Jun 1968
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
26
End of Watch:
05 Jun 1968
Unit of Assignment:
7th District - Englewood
Date of Birth:
13 Mar 1941
Served:
1 year, 7 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
007 - Englewood

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Restvale Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 17
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 15-W: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman Henry L. Peeler, Star #11174, aged 26 years, was a 1 year, 7 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 7th District - Englewood.

On June 5, 1968, at 9:00 p.m., Officer Peeler and his partner, Patrolman Ronald J. Lillwitz, age 30, were working the third watch on beat 702. The officers observed four men; Lyon Herbert, age 21, of 1108 Pennsylvania Avenue, East St. Louis, Illinois, Randolph Preston, age 30, of 5659 South Morgan Street, Raymond Sharp, age 20, of 1401 St. Louis Avenue, East St. Louis, Illinois, and Charles Childress, age 30, of East St. Louis, Illinois. The men were sitting on the sidewalk in front of an apartment building located at 5649 South Morgan Street. They had a paper bag between them with an open liquor container inside. The manner in which the men were sitting was blocking the sidewalk so that passerby couldn't pass. The officers stopped their car and as they approached Herbert and Sharp fled northbound on foot. As the chase initiated Officer Lillwitz yelled halt and put your hands up in the air. Sharp stopped and complied but Herbert continued to flee. Officer Peeler gave chase and followed Herbert as he fled into a gangway at 5659 South Morgan Street while his partner took custody of Sharp. While placing Sharp in custody, Officer Lillwitz recovered a .32 caliber Liberty revolver tucked in his belt. Meanwhile as Officer Peeler turned the corner into the gangway Herbert fired five times. Officer Peeler was struck and collapsed to the ground. Officer Lillwitz, hearing the gunshots, grabbed Sharp by the neck and ran with him to the gangway to assist his partner. Nearing the gangway he released Sharp and turned the corner. As he did he observed his partner lying on the ground and then saw Herbert rise up from behind some bushes, point a gun at him, and fire several shots. Officer Lillwitz returned fire striking Herbert and fatally wounding him. Just as the second round of gunfire occurred, assisting officers, beat 706, Patrolmen W. Anderson and H. Medidi arrived on scene and took control of Sharp at the direction of Officer Lillwitz. Sharp was attempting to blend into a crowd that had gathered and was re-apprehended by Officer Anderson after a lengthy struggle. Officer Medidi then went to aid Officer Peeler and found him lying face down bleeding profusely from his face and neck. Officer Peeler was shot once in the right jaw, once in the throat, twice in the left hand and sustained a graze wound to the left ear. He was transported to Englewood Hospital by beat 771 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Montizone at 9:25 p.m. on June 5, 1968. Officer Lillwitz sustained two gunshot wounds, one to the right forearm and one to the left hand. He was also transported to Englewood Hospital by beat 771 and was treated and released. Herbert Lyons was transported to Englewood Hospital by beat 772 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Montizone at 9:25 p.m. on June 5, 1968.

Other responding officers went to Preston's basement apartment, located at 5659 South Morgan Street, where he was located and placed into custody. He admitted to knowing the other three men and that he knew they were wanted for the shooting of the officer in East St. Louis. Charles Childress was also found hiding behind the boiler and arrested. Recovered in his possession was a .38 caliber Smith & Wesson revolver. Childress was charged with Murder and held over to the Grand Jury. Preston was charged with Harboring a fugitive. Sharp was charged with Unlawful Use of Weapon and Resisting Arrest. On August 15, 1968, the Grand Jury returned a True Bill against Childress.

Three of the men were fugitives from East St. Louis, Illinois and were sought for the slaying of Southern Railroad Police Lieutenant Jack Armstrong, two months earlier. After killing Armstrong they stole his .38 caliber Smith & Wesson service revolver, which would later be used by Herbert to murder Officer Peeler. Through further investigation, it was learned that the men were members of an African-American club known as Black Culture, Inc. The group had provided the men with the money needed to flee St. Louis and evade capture.

Officer Peeler's funeral mass was held at the Open Door Baptist Church located at 1301 South Sawyer Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 10, 1968 in Restvale Cemetery, 11700 South Laramie Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman Henry L. Peeler, born March 13, 1941, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 17, 1966.

Officer Peeler served in the U.S. Army and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Julia; children: Keely, age 6 and Sherrie, age 4; mother, Blanche and siblings: a sister and two brothers.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #G205654 Homicide Case Report and G205886 Justifiable Homicide Case Report.

Temporary Park Policeman Richard E. Pegue

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Park District Police Department
Appointed Date:
Jan 1946
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
371
Incident Date:
07 Mar 1946
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
25
End of Watch:
03 Jul 1946
Unit of Assignment:
South Section
Date of Birth:
11 Mar 1921
Served:
3 months*
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 24
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 40-E: 15

Incident Details:

Temporary Park Policeman Richard E. Pegue, Star #371, aged 25 years, was a 3 month veteran of the Chicago Park District Police Department, assigned to the South Section.

On March 7, 1946, at approximately 9:40 p.m., Officer Pegue was searching for a suspected rapist that had tried to attack a girl three days earlier in Washington Park on a boat in the lagoon. Pegue saw a man that fit the suspect's description near the parks boathouse with a female companion and placed both into custody. While standing with them just outside the boathouse, James Cantrell, the park’s concessions operator pulled up in a Ford truck. Officer Pegue asked Cantrell where Nate, the boathouse’s caretaker, could be found. Officer Pegue was looking for Nate in order to identify the suspect he had in custody as the suspected rapist. Cantrell stated that Nate had left the park. It was at this time that Officer Pegue asked Cantrell to transport him and the two suspects to the station.

Officer Pegue loaded the two into the car and climbed onto the trucks running board. At 437 East 60th Street, while being transported to the Wabash Avenue Station, the un-handcuffed girl produced a bottle and struck Cantrell in the head. The male suspect was able to disarm Officer Pegue in the melee and shot him in the chest striking his heart. The girl and the suspect fled the scene and made good their escape. Officer Pegue died from his wounds four months later on July 3, 1946.

Witnesses to the commotion were only able to give vague descriptions of the two bandits. The two suspects were never apprehended.

Officer Pegue was waked at a chapel located at 730 East 63rd Street, his funeral was also held in the chapel and he was laid to rest on July 8, 1946 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Temporary Park Policeman Richard E. Pegue, born March 11, 1921, was appointed to the Chicago Park District Police Department in January 1946.

Officer Pegue served in the U.S. Army in the 641st Ordnance Company, was a veteran of World War II receiving five battle stars for his bravery at the Battle of Normandy and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Laura; son, Richard, Jr. and parents: Mary and Mursoy.

The Chicago Park District Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on December 31, 1957. On January 1, 1958, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Police Department through an intergovernmental agreement. Fallen officers of the Chicago Park District Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Charles F. Pennell

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Oct 1889
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1852
Incident Date:
11 Aug 1902
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
44
End of Watch:
12 Aug 1902
Unit of Assignment:
District 10, 28th Precinct - Lake
Date of Birth:
1864
Served:
12 years, 10 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 31
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 23-E: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman Charles F. Pennell, Star #1852, aged 44 years, was a 12 year, 10 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 10, 28th Precinct - Lake.

On August 12, 1902, at 3:30 a.m., Officer Pennell and Patrolman Timothy Devine were ambushed by gunfire when they were following two burglary suspects who came out of alley on Jackson Boulevard between Paulina Street and Ashland Avenue and fired six shots. Both officers returned fire, each firing twice, one of them wounding one of the fleeing assailants. Officers Devine and Pennell were mortally wounded in the attack and were found by responding officers lying at the mouth of the alley. Officer Devine was found with his gun still in his hand, while Officer Pennell’s gun was found approximately twenty feet away next to a fence in the alley. Officer Devine was found dead at the scene. Officer Pennell was taken to Cook County Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds the next day on August 12, 1902.

Before Officer Pennell’s death, he was able to give a brief description of their assailants. He described two men, one six feet tall with a silk hat, the other approximately 5’ 8” tall. Trying to convey more details, Officer Pennell was unable to due to his injuries.

There were six arrests after the murders. John Pike was arrested on suspicion but later discharged on July 21, 1903. On November 30, 1909, Charles Kruger, under sentence of death for the murder of Constable Henry F. Bierer in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, on July 10, 1903, confessed to the murders of Officer Devine and Pennell. On February 11, 1904, Bierer was hanged in Pennsylvania. On August 12, 1905, Louis Stockowski was also arrested on information given by Louis Growzeski, who was at the time serving a sentence in Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet.

Officer Pennell was laid to rest in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois. His grave is located in Lot N18, Block 2, Section B.

Patrolman Charles F. Pennell, born in 1864, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 4, 1889.

Officer Pennell was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #1910.

Patrolman William F. Penney

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5365
Incident Date:
24 Jul 1934
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
36
End of Watch:
24 Jul 1934
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Bureau
Date of Birth:
15 Apr 1898
Served:
12 years, 1 month, 15 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 37
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 40-E: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman William F. Penney, Star #5365, aged 36 years, was a 12 year, 1 month, 15 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Bureau.

On July 24, 1934, Officer Penney was conducting an investigation at the Modern Tavern located at 722 South Halsted Street. While at the location, Officer Penney became involved in an argument with several men. The men attacked and severely beat Penney before they fled scene. Officer Penney then left the tavern and realized that his car keys had been lost during the fight. He returned to the tavern and his keys were returned to him by the bartender. Officer Penney then returned to the tavern at 9:50 p.m. the same day with three friends in search of the attackers who frequented the place. While the third friend waited in Penney’s car, the other two walked up to the tavern and found the tavern door to be locked. As they turned to walk back to the car, the front door swung open and a shotgun barrel emerged. Two shotgun blasts followed striking Penney and one of his friends, killing them instantly, the third friend was also struck but only sustained minor injuries.

Follow up investigation revealed that Officer Penney was in civilian clothing for the day and was only identified by his police star in his pocket. He was out of uniform because he was a prosecution witness in a conspiracy case that day. It was also determined that the shotgun blast was fired by Steve Vrionis, a bartender at the Modern Tavern who had also lived in an apartment above the tavern. The murder weapon was recovered in a room adjacent to Vrionis’s apartment. It is unknown whether Vrionis was ever apprehended.

Officer Penney was laid to rest on July 27, 1934 in Holy Sepulchre, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman William F. Penney, born April 15, 1898, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 9, 1922. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $120.00 during his career.

Officer Penney was survived by his wife, Vivian and three children, Edward A.

Patrolman Edwin E. Peppard

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Jul 1929
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5967
Incident Date:
15 Apr 1935
Cause of Death:
Fall - From Building
Age:
35
End of Watch:
15 Apr 1935
Unit of Assignment:
23rd District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
13 Jul 1899
Served:
5 years, 9 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4-E: 22

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edwin E. Peppard, Star #5967, aged 35 years, was a 5 year, 9 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 23rd District - Marquette.

On April 15, 1925, Officer Peppard was on duty and working with Patrolmen Joseph Carroll and Frank Janousek. After transporting a suicidal patient to Cook County Hospital, they were driving back to the Marquette District Station when they observed a four story apartment building located at 1207-09 South Damen Avenue on fire. Officer Carroll and Peppard rushed into the building while Officer Janousek remained with the squad car per Department regulation. The officers banged on doors and warned the residents of the fire. They were able to evacuate 15 families before they reached the fourth floor. Officer Carroll turned to Peppard and said, “We can't stick it out up here any longer. We're going to get burned either way so let's make a break for it.“ Officer Carroll then through the collar of his coat around his face and started down the stairs. He was met by a solid wall of flames at the landing and dove through it. After that he took a couple of breaths and stumbled down the rest of the stairs. Just as he exited the building he heard Officer Janousek cry out and Officer Peppard's body hit the pavement right beside Officer Peppard.

Officer Peppard became trapped by the flames on the stairwell and he retreated into a 4th floor apartment. Standing in the window Officer Peppard yelled for help and in an effort to escape the flames he climbed out of the window. He hung onto the window ledge with one hand while attempting to signal other officers with a flashlight in his other hand. As firemen lifted a ladder to rescue him flames burned his hand causing him to lose his grip. He fell to the pavement below just before the ladder could reach him. The entire time Officer Carroll believed his partner was right behind him as he came down the stairs. Officer Peppard was transported to Cook County Hospital where he was pronounced dead two hours later. His wife and newborn son were by his side.

Officer Peppard was waked at his residence located at 4817 South Cortez Street, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady Help of Christians Roman Catholic Church located at 822 North LeClaire Avenue and he was laid to rest on April 18, 1935 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Edwin E. Peppard, born July 13, 1899, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 1, 1929. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $120.00 during his career.

Officer Peppard was survived by his wife, Mary C. (nee Monahan), age 25; son, John (Jack) C., age 3 months; mother, Katherine (nee Schulthers) and siblings: Donald, Harry, Leo, Mrs. James McManus and Roy.

On June 27, 2007, Officer Peppard's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Benjamin Perez

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Oct 1998
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12225
Incident Date:
18 Sep 2002
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Train
Age:
32
End of Watch:
18 Sep 2002
Unit of Assignment:
10th District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
30 Mar 1970
Served:
3 years, 10 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Resurrection Catholic Cemetery - Justice, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 35
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 32-W: 23

Incident Details:

Patrolman Benjamin Perez, Star #12225, aged 32 years, was a 5 year, 10 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 10th District - Marquette.

On September 18, 2002, at 6:31 p.m., Officer Benjamin Perez, and his partner, Police Officer Ron Zuniga, received information about a narcotics transaction occurring near the Burlington Northern-Sante Fe railroad tracks, located on the 2100 block of South Spaulding Avenue. The officers climbed over a train embankment and were conducting surveillance from a railroad trestle. As they watched for illegal activity, a Metra commuter train traveling at a high rate of speed was headed in their direction. Officer Perez and his partner cleared the train tracks before the train passed, but the engine of the train created a vacuum and sucked Officer Perez under the train. Officer Perez's partner was able to jump to safety. In a twisted fate of coincidence, Officer Perez's sister, Hermelinda Alvarez, was aboard the train and heard the conductor announce there was an accident and that someone was hit. She couldn't have known it was her brother, but he came to her mind. In a news article she related, "I heard it was a police officer. Instantly I thought of my brother. But why in the world would it be him?" She left the scene and went to her Berwyn, Illinois home later that night and learned of the news.

Officer Perez was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, Oak Lawn, Illinois, his funeral mass was held at St. Daniel the Prophet Church located at 5330 South Nashville Avenue and he was laid to rest in Resurrection Catholic Cemetery, 7201 Archer Avenue, Justice, Illinois.

Patrolman Benjamin Perez, born March 30, 1970, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 26, 1998. He earned 16 Honorable Mentions and 2 Physical Fitness Awards during his career.

Officer Perez was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Michele Erica (nee Vinyard), age 28; children: Benjamin Nicolas age 21 months, Katarina, age 9 and Rebecca Elisa, age 5 months; parents: Angel and Catalina and siblings: Andrea (Misael) Villegas, Elena, Guillermina Villegas, Hermelinda (Jesus) Alvarez and Jose.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HH656849.

On May 24, 2005, Officer Perez's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

On September 20, 2011, the 5300 block of South Nashville Avenue was dedicated as "Honorary Officer Benjamin Perez Way." One brown honorary street sign was erected. The sign was located on the southeast corner of 53rd Street and Nashville Avenue in the heart of the Garfield Ridge community on the block where Officer Perez lived.

Patrolman Robert Harris Perkins

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Apr 1976
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
16557
Incident Date:
07 Mar 1992
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
45
End of Watch:
07 Mar 1992
Unit of Assignment:
3rd District - Grand Crossing
Date of Birth:
29 May 1946
Served:
15 years, 10 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Cedar Park Cemetery - Calumet Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 1
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 19-W: 19

Incident Details:

Patrolman Robert Harris Perkins, Star #16557, aged 45 years, was a 15 year, 10 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd District - Grand Crossing.

On March 7, 1992, at 10:26 a.m., Officer Perkins was on duty working the second watch 10-99 on beat 313. He observed two men in front of Betsy Ross Elementary School located at 6059 South Wabash Avenue. One of the two men, Stanley Davis, age 40, of 11536 South LaSalle Street, matched the description of a wanted burglary offender. Officer Perkins pulled over and approached Davis and escorted him to his squad car. Once at the squad car, Officer Perkins attempted to place Davis in the backseat at which time a struggle ensued and Davis produced a Sturm Ruger .357 revolver. Davis fired four times striking Officer Perkins twice. He was shot once in his left forearm, the bullet lodging in his shoulder, and once in the left upper back, the bullet lodging in his forehead. Davis then threw the revolver on the ground and fled the scene Southbound on Wabash Avenue. A witness observed the struggle as he was driving Northbound on Wabash Avenue and observed Officer Perkins fall to the ground following the gunfire. He attempted to call for help using the radio in the squad car, but accidently used the P.A. system. The witness remained on scene until responding officers arrived. Officer Perkins was transported to Cook County Hospital by CFD Ambulance #55 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Roxanne Roberts at 12:56 p.m. on March 7, 1992.

The handgun and clothing used by Davis was recovered between 60th Street and Michigan Avenue. Investigators were able to identify Davis, a parolee, through fingerprints lifted from the recovered weapon. Davis had been paroled in May of 1991 after serving time for another murder. He was apprehended eight days later hiding in a residence located in Harvey, Illinois. Davis stood trial and was convicted of first degree murder. He was sentenced to life in prison at the Stateville Correctional Center without the possibility of parole.

Officer Perkins was waked at A. A. Rayner and Sons Funeral Home located at 318 East 71st Street, his funeral mass was held at Emmanuel Baptist Church located at 8301 South Damen Avenue and he was laid to rest on March 12, 1992 in Cedar Park Cemetery, 12540 South Halsted Street, Calumet Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Robert Harris Perkins, born May 29, 1946, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 26, 1976. He earned 1 Police Blue Star Award (posthumously), 1 Department Commendation, 55 Honorable Mentions and 7 Complimentary Letters during his career.

Officer Perkins served in the U.S. Marine Corps from July 8, 1964 thru July 8, 1968, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Private. He also served in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve from July 8, 1968 thru July 8, 1970 and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Private. Officer Perkins was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Mattie Lou (nee Ingram), age 34; daughters: Ramona, age 16, Renee, age 22 and Tiffany May Walker, age 10 and siblings: Cornelius Thornton, Gwendolyn, Leon, Waymon Thornton.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #T105370.

On March 25, 1992, Officer Perkins' star was retired by Superintendent LeRoy Martin and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Perkins' Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman William A. Perren

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
27 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
846
Incident Date:
30 Nov 1924
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Accidental
Age:
28
End of Watch:
30 Nov 1924
Unit of Assignment:
District 10 - Gresham
Date of Birth:
08 Feb 1896
Served:
2 years, 1 month, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
006 - Gresham

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 13
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 12-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman William A. Perren, Star #846, aged 28 years, was a 2 year, 1 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 10 - Gresham.

On November 30, 1924, at 1:15 a.m., Officer Perren was on patrol with Sergeant Peter Carney, Patrolmen Dave Van Booven, Frank Morrell and Frank Warburten. They were working in plainclothes and driving an unmarked Ford Flivver Squad. Officer Perren, the driver of the squad car, drove up alongside the car of Hugh A. Stewart, in front of 8515 South Paulina Street. The officers had just turned the corner at 85th and Paulina Streets and observed the car at a standstill at the curb. They pulled alongside to investigate the suspicious auto. Officer Perren ran the autos bell as Sergeant Carney stepped out of the car. It was at this time that shots rang out. Stewart was just about to pull away and park his car in the garage at the rear of his home after dropping his wife off in front. While at a standstill in his automobile, Stewart mistook the officers for a gang of robbers. Fearing for his safety he drew his gun and fired 8 rounds at the policemen. Officer Morrell then yelled at Stewart, “We’re Detectives” and Stewart stopped shooting saying, “Great God! I was sure you were holdup men.” Officer Perren was shot four times and was hit in the head and chest near the heart. The other rounds struck Officers Van Booven in the right arm and Warburten was struck in the left arm. Officer Perren was rushed to Auburn Park Hospital where he died the same day. Officers Van Booven and Warburten were also taken to Auburn Park Hospital where they were treated and eventually recovered. Stewart was taken to the station where he made a statement and was released without charges.

An investigation by Detective William Schoemaker resulted in the finding that the incident was a direct result of the many holdups that had previously occurred in the area causing the residents to become fearful. On December 1, 1924, Hugh A. Stewart was exonerated by the Coroner.

Officer Perren was laid to rest in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman William A. Perren, born February 8, 1896, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 27, 1922.

Officer Perren was survived by his wife and child.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #6855.

Patrolman Peter Peterson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Nov 1926
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
563
Incident Date:
25 Jan 1928
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
31
End of Watch:
19 Feb 1928
Unit of Assignment:
28th District - Austin
Date of Birth:
23 Jun 1896
Served:
1 year, 3 months, 0 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
015 - Austin

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olive Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Peter Peterson, Star #563, aged 31 years, was a 1 year, 3 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 28th District - Austin.

On January 25, 1928, at approximately 10:30 p.m., Officer Peterson was riding his police motorcycle with his partner, Patrolman Dennis Egan, seated in the sidecar. They were traveling westbound on Chicago Avenue. As the officers approached the intersection of Chicago and Lavergne Avenues they collided with an eastbound passenger automobile driven by Henry A. Smith, which suddenly made a left turn on to northbound Lavergne Avenue. Officer Peterson was severely injured and Officer Egan sustained severe bruising. Officer Peterson was taken to St. Ann Hospital where doctors attempted to treat his external injuries. He lingered in the hospital for 25 days before succumbing to his injuries on February 19, 1928.

Henry Smith was held pending a Coroner’s Inquest after the crash. Officer Peterson's death was declared accidental during Coroner's inquest and Smith was released.

Officer Peterson was waked at his parent’s residence located at 5801 West Bernice Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Irving Park Gospel Hall located at 5614 West Dakin Street and he was laid to rest on February 21, 1928 in Mount Olive Cemetery, 3800 North Narragansett Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Peter Peterson, born July 23, 1896, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 19, 1926.

Officer Peterson was survived by his wife, Ellen (nee Nolden); parents: Anton, Sr. and Maria and siblings: Anton, Jr., Christine Soreneen, Marie Greenberg and Mrs. Hede.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman Joseph L. Pijanowski

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 May 1917
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1427
Incident Date:
10 Nov 1920
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
18 Nov 1920
Unit of Assignment:
District 14, 19th Precinct - Lawndale
Date of Birth:
24 Sep 1888
Served:
3 years, 6 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 3
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 21-E: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph L. Pijanowski, Star #1427, aged 32 years, was a 3 year, 6 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 14, 19th Precinct - Lawndale.

On November 10, 1920, at 1:45 a.m., Officer Pijanowski was on patrol when he came across former alderman Winfield Held near a drug store. The alderman had driven to the drug store to get medicine for his 2-year-old daughter. While on the way home, he came across Officer Pijanowski and asked if he would escort him to his residence located at 2544 South Kedvale Avenue. Held had previously received death threats, which is why he had asked for a police escort that night. Officer Pijanowski got into Held’s auto and they proceeded to his residence. Upon arriving the men turned into the driveway beside the house. As they turned into the driveway the lights from the auto illuminated the porch. It was at this time that Officer Pijanowski observed three men, Raymond Knight of 1922 South Spaulding Avenue, Albert E. Willer and Henry J. Schmidt, hiding beneath the porch stairway. After being ordered to come out, the offenders opened fire. Both Officer Pijanowski and Alderman Held men were hit; collapsing to the ground as the offenders made good their escape. Both were taken to St. Anthony Hospital. Officer Pijanowski lingered in the hospital for eight days before succumbing to his wounds on November 18, 1920. Alderman Held was treated and eventually recovered.

After the incident a .32 caliber Ivor-Johnson revolver was recovered at the scene. It had been found fully loaded and unfired. The firearm was traced in order to ascertain its ownership, the results of the trace are unknown. Alderman Held was detained and questioned. He was working as a Clerk in the Municipal Court at the time and was questioned in regard to his alleged involvement in illegal liquor deals. Held denied any complicity.

Police got a break in the case when Dr. Chester W. Fouser of 4800 West 22nd Street, Cicero, Illinois, reported that he had treated Knight for a gunshot wound to his hand the night of the shooting. On November 15, 1920, Raymond Knight was arrested and charged with murder. On November 20, 1920, the Coroner held him to the Grand Jury after confessing that robbery of Mr. Held was the motive. He also implicated Henry J. Schmidt and Albert E. Willer. On November 29, 1920, Schmidt and Willer were arrested and also charged with murder. On November 30, 1920, Judge Caverly held them to the Grand Jury without bail. On January 14, 1921, Knight and Willer were sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Sullivan. The charges against Schmidt were eventually dropped.

Officer Pijanowski was laid to rest on November 22, 1920 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph L. Pijanowski, born September 24, 1888, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 7, 1917. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Pijanowski was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #4829.

Patrolman Bernie Poe

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Oct 1956
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6509
Incident Date:
08 Nov 1957
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
23
End of Watch:
08 Nov 1957
Unit of Assignment:
23rd District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
16 Dec 1933
Served:
1 year, 1 month, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Restvale Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 18
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 4
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-E: 9

Incident Details:

Patrolman Bernie Poe, Star #6509, aged 23 years, was a 1 year, 1 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 23rd District - Marquette.

On November 8, 1957, Officer Poe was walking his beat when he saw Patrolman William McDonagh, age 52, struggling with a forgery suspect in front of 3140 West Roosevelt Road. The forgery suspect was Elijah White, age 36 of 2235 West Roosevelt Road. White had attempted to cash a stolen check when he went into a jewelry store with Arthur Richard Jones. During the struggle with Officer McDonagh White gained control of Officer McDonagh's service revolver. White shot Patrolman Poe in the chest with the gun as he ran to help his fellow officer. White then shot Officer McDonagh in the right arm before fleeing.

During the investigation, White's identity was learned from Arthur Richard Jones who said that the two entered the jewelry store. Jones went in to buy a pair of trousers and when he saw White trying to cash the stolen check he left. Jones also said he left because he had cashed a bogus check the day before and he didn't want to get more involved. Jones said he last saw White running south on Troy Avenue from Roosevelt Road. A police dragnet was put out on the Roosevelt Road area in an effort to locate White. However, when White was reported somewhere in Baldwin, Michigan many of the policemen were called off.

On November 10, 1957, White was arrested outside of Baldwin, Michigan while hitch hiking by Sheriff Jesse MacDougall of Lake County. Lieutenant James McMahan motored to Baldwin the same day to get white and extradite him back to Chicago. During the interrogation, White admitted to passing the bogus check and recalled the events before and after the shooting but said little about the actual shooting. White said he heard the gun go off in the struggle and thought he was shot. He did not recall having the gun in his hand. After the fracas he fled to Willie Green's house on Roosevelt Road. He spent the night there and when he heard the news report on the radio the next morning, he told Green that he wanted to go to Mackinac Island to visit a sick relative. He asked Green to let him go as far as Baldwin with him because he knew Green was going to Baldwin.

Elijah White was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner and indicted for manslaughter. On February 4, 1958, White was sentenced to 99 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary during a bench trial by Judge Samuel B. Epstein. White would not be eligible for parole until he reached 70 years of age.

Officer Poe was waked at Biggs & Biggs Funeral Home located at 3246 West Jackson Boulevard, his funeral mass was held at Zion Hill Mount Baptist Church located at 1460 West 78th Street and he was laid to rest on November 16, 1957 in Restvale Cemetery, 11700 South Laramie Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman Bernie Poe, born December 16, 1933, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 1, 1956.

On December 18, 1957, Officer Poe's star was retired by Commissioner Timothy J. O'Connor and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Poe's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman Charles William Pollard Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Apr 1952
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5540
Incident Date:
13 Dec 1967
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
44
End of Watch:
13 Dec 1967
Unit of Assignment:
10th District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
26 Jul 1923
Served:
15 years, 7 months, 20 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Restvale Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 16
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 35-E: 1

Incident Details:

Patrolman Charles William Pollard, Sr., Star #5540, aged 44 years, was a 15 year, 7 month, 20 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 10th District - Marquette.

On December 14, 1967, at 6:00 a.m., Officer Pollard was found by a neighbor, Mr. Clyde Roscoe, lying face down and unresponsive in the alley behind his apartment building located at 4038 West 21st Street. Mr. Roscoe them informed Officer Pollards father that a man was lying in the alley behind his apartment. They both went to the alley where Mr. Pollard discovered the man was his son. Officer Pollard's son, whom was also present, called the police. Beat 1015, Patrolmen Robert E. Flynn and Thomas Cichy, responded. Upon arrival the officers met Ms. Pollard who stated that "Something is wrong with my poor Charles." The officers asked where he was located and Ms. Pollard replied, "In the alley behind the car." The offers went to the alley and found Officer Pollard lying face down and not moving. Officer Cichy felt his stomach and checked for a pulse. Officer Flynn discovered that the man had an empty holster and asked Ms. Pollard if he was a policeman, She replied yes. The officer then notified the dispatcher on Zone 6. Officer Pollard's wallet was located nearby, empty of its contents. His .38 caliber service revolver and police identification were missing.

On December 13, 1967, at approximately 9:00 p.m., Officer Pollard had just returned home and was locking his car when he was approached by Eugene Armstrong, age 21, of 4214 West Ogden Avenue and Clifton Hill, age 23, of 4157 West Fillmore Street. Hill held Pollard at gunpoint while Pollard's badge, gun, and wallet containing $34 were taken. Hill ordered Pollard to walk further into the alley and after walking about ten feet Pollard spun around and said "That's enough. I am a policeman. You're under arrest." Hill then fired at Pollard striking him in the chest and the two bandits fled the scene.

On December 16, 1967, Eugene Armstrong was arrested in connection with the robbery and murder of Officer Pollard. During interrogation, Armstrong identified Clifton Hill as the actual killer. A manhunt for Hill was conducted and on December 18, 1967, at 5:00 a.m., Hill surrendered after arranging to meet detectives at the Greyhound depot located at Clark and Randolph Streets. On January 15, 1968, Armstrong was found guilty of murder during a jury trial. The jury recommended the death penalty. Armstrong's conviction would later be reversed after a new trial revealed that the prosecution failed to produce witnesses for a statement made by Armstrong at the time of his arrest. Armstrong's statement implicating himself and Hill should have been suppressed according to the Illinois Supreme Court. On January 17, 1968, Hill was also found guilty of murder and robbery during a jury trial by a different jury. That jury did not recommend the death penalty. On January 30, 1968, Armstrong was sentenced to death in the electric chair on April 1, 1968 by Judge L. Sheldon Brown. On February 2, 1968, Hill was sentenced to 50 to 100 years in prison for murder and 10 to 20 years for robbery. In January of 2013 Hill became eligible for parole. A parole hearing was held in Springfield, Illinois and Hill's parole request was denied.

Officer Pollard was waked at House of Branch and he was laid to rest on December 18, 1967 in Restvale Cemetery, 11700 South Laramie Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman Charles William Pollard, Sr., born July 26, 1923, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 23, 1952. He earned 1 Honorable Mention during his career. On April 23, 1952, Officer Pollard was issued a 1905 Series "Pieplate," Star #1672. On December 15, 1966, he returned that star and was issued a brand new 1955 series star, Star #5540. Star #5540 was the same star number issued to him at the time of his death.

Officer Pollard was survived by his wife, Ruth, aged 39; son, Charles A., Jr., age 16; Step-daughter: Careen, age 18 and mother, Jennie U.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #F431828.

Patrolman Edward C. Post

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Aug 1913
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
09 Jan 1933
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
45
End of Watch:
09 Jan 1933
Unit of Assignment:
17th District - New City
Date of Birth:
05 Jun 1887
Served:
19 years, 4 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
008 - Chicago Lawn

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Bethania Cemetery - Justice, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward C. Post, Star # Unknown, aged 45 years, was a 19 year, 4 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 17th District - New City.

On January 8, 1933, at 4:00 p.m., Officer Post’s tour of duty ended. While still in his police uniform he attended a party at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Zack located at 2533 West 46th Place. Also present at the party were Mr. Harry S. Munroe, an ex-convict who called Officer Post his best friend and Miss Helen Kindley, age 25, of 2533 West 46th Place and Charles Hemak, age 23, of 2454 West 46th Place. The guests shared a bottle of whiskey and shortly after midnight on January 9, 1933 Munroe became belligerent and abusive towards Miss Kindley after they had danced. Miss Kindley then informed Officer Post that Munroe had insulted her. In response, Officer Post remonstrated with Munroe causing him to apologize to Miss Kindley. At 12:25 a.m., Munroe angered that he had been forced to apologize, while sitting opposite from Officer Post in the room, drew a revolver and announced that he was going to kill Officer Post. Munroe wildly fired at Officer Post and stopped. Officer Post then rose from his chair and drew his revolver. It was at this time that Miss Lindley stepped between the two men in an attempt to stop Munroe from firing again. Officer Post then pushed Miss Lindley aside and Munroe opened fire once again, shooting three more rounds. Officer Post was struck in his body and began to fall. As he fell, he returned fire striking Munroe in the right wrist. Munroe then fled the scene making good his escape.

Munroe was later caught in an alley at 46th Street and Western Avenue by Sergeant Joseph Devery and his squad. During questioning, Munroe admitted to the shooting. On January 9, 1933, Munroe was held by the Coroner for murder.

Officer Post was waked at a chapel located at 1643 West 63rd Street, his funeral mass was held at Thoburn Church located at 64th and Paulina Streets and he was laid to rest on January 12, 1933 in Bethania Cemetery, 7701 South Archer Avenue, Justice, Illinois.

Patrolman Edward C. Post, born May 5, 1887, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 13, 1913.

Officer Post was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, a Master Mason and a member of Cyrene Lodge No. 987 AF&AM and Jackson Park Chapter No. 222 Royal Arch Masons. He was survived by his wife, Margaretha; daughter, Virginia; father, Reinhardt and siblings: Paul, Mrs. Alma Henke and Reinhardt, Jr.

Patrolman John Powell Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
29 Dec 1890
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1168
Incident Date:
06 Sep 1892
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
06 Sep 1892
Unit of Assignment:
District 9, 21st Precinct - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
1860
Served:
1 year, 8 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 25
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 44-E: 14

Incident Details:

Patrolman John Powell, Jr., Star #1168, aged 32 years, was a 1 year, 8 month, 10 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 9, 21st Precinct - Maxwell.

On September 6, 1892, Officer Powell and Probationary Patrolman Henry L. McDowell, while conducting a raid on an illegal racetrack, pursued a racehorse owner, James M. Brown, age 54, who was brandishing a gun while attempting to escape. Officer Powell was shot twice while attempting to apprehend James Brown. As brown attempted to escape after shooting Officer Powell, Officer McDowell caught up with him and ordered him to drop his weapon. Brown refused and a second gun battle ensued in which Officer McDowell was mortally wounded. Officer McDowell was transported to Cook County Hospital where he died at 6:10 p.m. on September 8, 1892. Officer Powell died instantly on scene.

James Brown was shot and killed the same day by other pursuing officers.

Officer Powell was waked at his residence located at No. 358 Center Avenue (present day 2111 West Armitage Avenue), his funeral mass was also held in his residence and was he was laid to rest on September 9, 1892 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman John Powell, Jr., born in 1860, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 29, 1890.

Officer Powell was survived by his wife and two children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #123 and Case #2812.

DEATH AT GARFIELD: Excerpt from the Chicago Daily Tribune, September 7, 1892

On September 6, 1892, Officer Powell, was involved in a raid by city authorities to suppress the resort of the defiant Garfield Park Race Track Club. The raid was not unexpected, but no one looked for such sudden and exciting events of the following. The Police had invaded the park in much the same way as they had on September 5th, and had loaded their patrol wagons with park employees, bookmakers, and patrons of the resort. The action of the police on September 5th had the effect of scaring people away from the race track, and the entire attendance did not exceed 1,500 persons, of whom a large percentage were in the custody of the police within five minutes after the bluecoats had entered the park, which was at 4 o'clock, and just after the third race of the day had been ruined. Everybody wanted around the grandstand had been corralled and 50 policemen were chasing frightened sportsmen through the inner field and returning with them to the patrol wagons, which were located behind the grand stand. Squads of policemen chased along the stables, picking up hostellers and rubbers, while Inspector Lewis and Captain Mahoney and other officers were arranging for the transportation of the prisoners to the Des Plaines Street Station. A great crowd of bookmakers and hangers on about the track had gathered outside the park on Crawford Avenue (present day Cicero Avenue), and found some pleasure in jeering the police, but the bluecoats seemed to recognize that they had by far the better part of the game and took the chaff in good naturedly enough.

A SHOT IS HEARD

As the patrol wagons were ready to depart with the prisoners the shrill noise of the police whistle was heard coming from the direction of the southwest portion of the park. Then a shot was heard. There was more blowing of whistles and then more firing, and Inspector Lewis ordered his men, most of whom had returned to the wagons, to hurry to the scene of the alarm. The bluecoats sped away readily. They knew there was mischief in the air, for they had heard threats that their efforts to arrest James M. Brown, 54, owner of the race track, whose stables were located near the southwest gate would be met with force. They knew that Brown had a record earned as Sheriff in Texas, of twelve notches on his gun, and it was known that he had boasted within 24 hours that he would shoot down any officer who attempted to arrest him, to enter his stables, or to take away any of his employees. As 200 policemen started away from the grandstand a bookmaker who was in captivity, cried out from one of the wagons: "That sounds like Jim Brown's gun."

Frightened stable boys, hostlers, and hangers on came running from the south, seeking the protection of the police and announcing that a fearful fight was on the prairie outside the southern wall of the racing park. Half way down the gate the police heard the firing as it became more rapid as they bent and knocked men out of their way as they went to the rescue. They raced along on top of the stables, climbed the high fences, and went straight after three or four officers who were pursuing a little man in a grey suit. It was Captain James Brown trying to add to his reputed desperate Texas record. Other fugitives had scattered to the east and west along the prairies, and officers started after them, while a score continued in the chase of Brown. At Flournoy Street Brown halted, took deliberate aim at the closest of his pursuers, fired, and then turned and ran again, and disappeared behind a little group of houses near Jan Huss Avenue (present day Springfield Avenue) and Flournoy Street.

HE ANSWERS WITH HIS GUN

A policeman in the lead cried out to Brown to put up his gun and quit shooting, and several more policemen fired into the air, thinking to cower Brown, and at the same time keep back the crowd of citizens which had joined in the pursuit.

Brown's only answer, as he came out from the shelter of the little houses, was to fire again at his pursuers, after which he started on a run towards Lexington Avenue (present day Lexington Street), where he continued his flight through a narrow opening between the high board fence surrounding houses on the corner of the avenue and Jan Huss Avenue (present day Springfield Avenue) and a new house in the course of erection. Carpenters and plasterers working on the house saw Brown coming with his gin, and they dropped into the basement of the place to save their own skins. In the meanwhile, the police had deployed, some going to the west of the new house and others toward Jan Huss Avenue (present day Springfield Avenue) to head off the man who had grown so desperate in the chase. The policemen were now firing at the man and were gaining on him rapidly. Officer John Powell reached the sidewalk west of the house almost at the same time that Brown emerged from a little lane at the end of it. Brown raised his pistol, and before Officer Powell could climb upon the sidewalk, Brown fired, and the bullet struck Officer Powell in the arm. An instant later another ball from Brown's weapon had passed through the Powell's left hand and lodged in his abdomen.

BROWN SHOOTS HIS VICTIM AGAIN

Officer Powell fell back on the prairie. He had received his death wound. But the man who gave it was not content. Brown rushed up to his victim, looked into his dying eyes, placed his pistol against the man's chin, and sent another bullet crashing through his head.

By this time the officers were coming towards the scene on a lively run, and from all directions. It was Brown's evident intention to escape by way of the open prairie to the southwest, but he saw his escape in that direction blocked by the police, and, leaping over the body of Officer Powell, he started towards the north, the bullets of the officers who had seen their brother fall and then brutally shot again, whizzing past his head. As Brown reached the little alley near the new house, Officer Henry L. McDarrell of the Des Plaines Street Station turned into Lexington Avenue from Jan Huss Avenue and cried out to Brown: "Don't shoot any more! Put up your gun! I will not shoot!"

"But I will," Brown yelled as he lifted his weapon and pulled the trigger.

The gun misfired. Brown looked at the weapon coolly and critically, and finding another cartridge in it determined to do and die right there. McDarrell carried his revolver in his hand, and as Brown who was not more than 30 feet away, lifted his gun for a final shot, McDarrell raised his weapon. Both men fired at the same time, and then both fell. A hundred officers had surrounded Brown by this time, and more were coming up after. Several shots had been fired at him from different directions during the minute of his encounter with McDarrell, but the bullet under the force of which he fell evidently came from the weapon of the officer into whose right side Brown had sent home his last shot.

McDARRELL'S AWFUL DEATH STRUGGLE

McDarrell fell on the sidewalk, but quickly rose again and ran around the corner of Jan Huss Avenue, where he half tumbled into the gutter. Other officers who came up cared for him in every possible way, while a hundred bluecoats surrounded Brown, every one of them with the gleam of desire for vengeance in his eyes. Other officers had cared for and placed in a comfortable position on the sidewalk Officer Powell, in whose throat the death rattle was already heard. He was unconscious and died almost before the smoke of the revolver that had been in such active play on the prairie had vanished. Several of his companions stood guard over his body, while others joined the throng which surrounded the Texan who was making as strong a struggle for life as any man could whose heart had been grazed by a bullet. His pale face was turned toward the sky and his little frame, for the man only weighed 135 pounds, quivered with the agony he was undergoing. He had fallen right in his tracks and his slouch hat was still half fastened om his head. Drops of blood were coming through a little hole in his shirt right above his heart, and in one of his spasms he half spat out a quantity of blood, some of which trickled over his face. He was conscious when he first fell, but only for an instant, and he tried to speak, probably some word of defiance and hatred for his enemies, the police, for there was a bitter glare in his eyes as he rolled them from one side to another as if attempting the recognition of someone in the crowd.

The pistol with which he had killed Officer Powell and wounded Officer McDarrell was lying by his right hand. It was a .44 caliber, automatic weapon with pearl handle, all its chambers were empty.

Before Brown died the patrol wagon was called to the scene and hurried away towards the County Hospital, its crew offering tender duties to McDarrell, who was failing rapidly. Another patrol wagon came along and six officers lifted into it the body of Powell, which was taken home.

The officers who crowded around Brown sought to secure no services of a physician for him. His head was allowed to rest on the hard ground. There were no words of pity for him, for the resentment the bluecoats felt over the slaughter of one of their number in so merciless a way was strong in their hearts. The first policemen to arrive were actually as fierce as lions that have just tasted blood, and only the coolness of some few of them saved a repetition of the cruel thing that Brown had done to Powell after that officer had fallen fatally wounded. Two officers were forced to restrain one brother officer who insisted that Brown should be treated just as he had treated Powell.

"I saw him myself," said the angry officer, "run up after Powell was dead, stoop over him like a wild beast, put that big gun of his in his mouth, and fire. You can go and see for yourselves. He nearly burned the face off him with the powder, which sent the bullet through Powell's head."

"It is true," said another officer. "I saw him do it, too. He hadn't a bit of mercy in him and he doesn't deserve any mercy from us. He never had any mercy on anybody. I knew him. He killed a dozen men in Texas."

And the big bluecoat stooped as if it would be great satisfaction to him to throttle the man who just at that moment gave a convulsive shudder and died.

Detective Sergeant John J. Prendergast

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Mar 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
375
Incident Date:
30 Aug 1914
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
41
End of Watch:
30 Aug 1914
Unit of Assignment:
District 21, 35th Precinct - Shakespeare
Date of Birth:
21 Aug 1873
Served:
8 years, 5 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
017 - Albany Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. James at Sag Bridge Cemetery - Lemont, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 18
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 44
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-W: 11

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant John J. Prendergast, Star #375, aged 41 years, was an 8 year, 5 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 21, 35th Precinct - Shakespeare.

On August 30, 1914, at 2:15 a.m., Detective Sergeant Prendergast and his partner Detective Sergeant John Kostizewski had arrested John Dayle of 3551 West Wolfram Street for several saloon burglaries. Detective Sergeant Prendergast was in the process of transporting Dayle to the Shakespeare Avenue Station and had just alighted from a Crawford Avenue (present day Pulaski Road) streetcar. They were waiting on a corner at the intersection of Crawford and Milwaukee Avenues with ten other people. Detective Sergeant Prendergast was intending to board the next southbound Milwaukee Avenue streetcar. While waiting, an automobile containing five intoxicated men approached at a high rate of speed, approximately 50 mph. Detective Sergeant Prendergast shouted a warning to the citizens while Kostizewski pulled the prisoner to safety. While in the act of warning the pedestrians of the approaching danger he was unable to reach safety himself and was struck. The force of the collision killed him instantly. The vehicle continued to speed away without slowing; Detective Sergeant Kostizewski firing five shots at the vehicle in an attempt to make it stop. Detective Sergeant Kostizewski and the witnesses were unable to make out the license plate of the fleeing auto.

Eventually two arrests were made in the case. On September 12, 1914, George Teleff, driver of the automobile, and Frederick Bartells, passenger, were arrested, charged with manslaughter and held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. The October 1914 Grand Jury returned a No Bill on Bartells and a True Bill for Teleff. On January 23, 1915, Tellef was acquitted by Judge Honore.

Detective Sergeant Prendergast was waked at his residence located at 2325 West Ohio Street and he was laid to rest on September 1, 1914 in St. James at Sag Bridge Cemetery, 10600 South Archer Avenue, Lemont, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant John J. Prendergast, born August 21, 1873, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 22, 1906. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915.

Sergeant Prendergast was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Nora; children: Kileen and Mary; mother and siblings: James and Josephine.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #4737.