LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

Checkerboard Band

Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

  • The results are being filtered by the character: R
1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman Albert Race

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
10 Jun 1875
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7
Incident Date:
04 Oct 1878
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
26
End of Watch:
04 Oct 1878
Unit of Assignment:
1st Precinct - Harrison Street Station
Date of Birth:
02 Apr 1852
Served:
3 years, 3 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Fitch Cemetery - Falls, Pennsylvania
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 19
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 9
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 27-E: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman Albert Race, Star #7, aged 26 years, was a 3 year, 4 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st Precinct - Harrison Street Station.

On October 4, 1878, at approximately 9:48 p.m., Officer Albert Race observed a horse drawn wagon filled with expensive merchandise. It was stopped facing south in front of Lesser Friedberg's Pawnshop, located at No. 494 South State Street (present day 904 South State Street). Ostensibly a pawnshop, the place was really a "fence" for the reception of stolen property, kept by one Lesser Friedberg. The officer, naturally suspecting that the goods were stolen, waited until a man emerged from the pawnshop. He observed two men, George Freeman and Johnny Lamb, both approximately 25 years old sitting on the wagon seat. The officer stepped up to the edge of the sidewalk and began to question them regarding their business, and the property in their possession. Suddenly, without warning Lamb drew a pistol pointed it at Officer Race's head and fired. Officer Race was struck and was mortally wounded.

Lamb then leapt from the wagon and fled on foot across State Street, then down Eldridge Court (present day 9th Street), and towards Wabash Avenue. As he ran he shoved the revolver into a hip pocket. Freeman turned the wagon around and set off northbound on State Street, attempting the make the horses run. Unable to get the horses to run, he jumped off of the wagon within 100 feet and fled on foot eastbound through a coal yard. Both men made good their escape. Witnesses to the murder carried Officer Race to Freidigki’s Drug Store nearby where he was pronounced dead. Officer Race was then transported to Elton’s “dead room” where he was placed on ice for viewing.

The horse, wagon, and contents were taken to the Harrison Street Station. It was subsequently ascertained that the property in the wagon consisted of a large quantity of silks, which had been stolen by burglary from the store of E. S. Jaffery & Company, No. 120 5th Avenue (present day 120 North Wells Street). The burglary had occurred about an hour before Officer Race was killed. During a full inventory of the wagon, it was learned that some of the silks that were stolen were not accounted for.

Following the shooting, investigators spoke with a witness, William Harmon, who gave a full account of what had occurred. By this time the pawnshop’s curtains were drawn and the doors locked. It was open during the incident, as the two bandits had attempted to sell some of the stolen goods to the shop. Detectives Dan Considine and James Flynn questioned Lesser Friedberg and his wife. Both were well known as a fence for stolen goods. It wasn’t long before the missing silks not contained in the wagon were found secreted in Friedberg's pawnshop. Mr. and Mrs. Friedberg were arrested and taken to the Harrison Street Station.

On October 13, 1878, Johnny Lamb with the following alias’s Charles Dennis, Jimmy Driscoll, Philo Durfee, Jim Griffin and James Williamson was arrested. His accomplice, George Freeman was arrested in St. Paul, Minnesota and extradited back to Chicago. The men, George Freeman, Lessor Friedberg and Johnny Lamb were held in the County Jail awaiting trial. Friedberg stood trial separately and was found guilty. Friedberg was sentenced to four years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Johnny Lamb and George Freeman were indicted for Officer Race's murder. In March 1879, they were tried before Judge E. S. Williams. Freeman turned State's Evidence and testified against Lamb. Lamb then stood trial and was found guilty by jury trial and sentenced to death by hanging. An appeal was made to the Supreme Court on writ of error and a new trial was granted. On February 16, 1882, Lamb was found not guilty during a second jury trial.

Race waked at his residence located at No. 18 Keeley Street, his funeral mass was also held at his residence and he was laid to rest on October 8, 1878 in Fitch Cemetery, Falls Township, Wyoming County, Pennsylvania.

Patrolman Albert Race, born April 2, 1852, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 10, 1875.

Officer Race was survived by his mother, Mary and brother, Lester.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #1994.

Detective Erwin Carl Rach

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 May 1942
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
29 Dec 1946
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
38
End of Watch:
29 Dec 1946
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Bureau
Date of Birth:
17 Nov 1908
Served:
4 years, 7 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Cedar Park Cemetery - Calumet Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 19
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 50
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3-E: 19

Incident Details:

Detective Erwin Carl Rach, Star # Unknown, aged 38 years, was a 4 year, 7 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Bureau.

On December 29, 1946, at 3:00 a.m., Detective MacLeay and his partners, Detectives Erwin C. Rach and Raymond T. O'Hara were transporting a prisoner, Earvlee Sullivan, during a snowstorm, to the Detective Bureau. As they were driving on the 2900 block of South State Street their squad car was struck head on by another car. That car was driven by John Trencan, age 24, who had been drinking for six hours before colliding with the detective's squad car. Trencan’s car had skidded on the icy pavement and veered into oncoming traffic striking the Detectives’ squad car. Detectives MacLeay and Rach were killed instantly, Detective O'Hara and Mr. Sullivan survived the crash.

John Trencan was heading home with two companions after celebrating the delivery of his new car with a six hour drinking spree at six different taverns. The widows of Detectives MacLeay and Rach filed lawsuits after the crash demanding $75,000 in damages from the taverns and $10,000 each from Trencan. In September of 1948 a settlement of $75,000 was reached. The widows of the two deceased detectives each received $24,000, Detective O'Hara received $24,000.00 and Sullivan received $3,000.00. The defendants in the suit included John Trencan and the six taverns: Club Mars, 11338 South Michigan Avenue; Club Rond-E-Voo, 100 West State Street, Calumet City; 8 Ball Tavern, 17249 South Halsted Street; Pink Poodle, 502 South State Street; Trocadero, 525 South State Street and Mildred's Tavern, 716 South State Street. The widows were able to sue the tavern owners under the Dram Shop Act which allows legal action against the seller of alcoholic beverages when an injury or death occurs as a result of intoxication.

Detective Rach was waked at William Bartz & Son Funeral Home located at 7032 South Wentworth Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Immanuel Evangelical Church located at 7000 South Michigan Avenue and he was laid to rest on January 2, 1947 in Cedar Park Cemetery, 12540 South Halsted Street, Calumet Park, Illinois.

Detective Erwin Carl Rach, born November 17, 1908, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 16, 1942. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $120.00 during his career.

Detective Rach was survived by his wife, Ella; children: Arthur, Edward and Shirley Haddock; mother, Hermina (nee Hitzke) and siblings: Charles, Elda Lindmark, Emma Smools, Frank, William and the late Walter. He was preceded in death by his brother, Walter.

On February 20, 2008, Officer Rach's star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Frank Gershon Rappaport

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
11 Apr 1966
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12256
Incident Date:
13 Nov 1969
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
13 Nov 1969
Unit of Assignment:
3rd District - Grand Crossing
Date of Birth:
01 Feb 1937
Served:
3 years, 7 months, 2 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Cedar Park Cemetery - Calumet Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 19
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 20
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 57-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman Frank Gershon Rappaport, Star #12256, aged 32 years, was a 3 year, 7 month, 2 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd District - Grand Crossing.

On November 13, 1969, at 12:30 a.m., Patrolmen John Joseph Gilhooley and his partner, Patrolman Michael Brady, were working the first watch on beat 226. The two officers were assigned by the Communications Center to investigate a complaint of a man with a gun in front of an abandoned building located at 5801 South Calumet Avenue. They spoke to the complainant, Miss Wesley, inside her apartment and she stated that she observed two men enter the abandoned building directly across the street. Both officers proceeded to investigate the complaint. As the officers entered the gangway of the abandoned building located at 5809 South Calumet Avenue two men, Lance Bell, age 20, of 5809 South Indiana Avenue, member of the Black Panthers, and another unknown male, appeared and fled on foot. The officers gave chase and shouted “Police Officers, Stop!“ While in pursuit and as the officers emerged from the gangway a third man, Spurgeon J. Winters, Jr., age 19, of 5647 South Perry Avenue, member of the Black Panthers, ambushed them and fired a shotgun from a porch below. The officers returned fire but were both struck by the gunfire and collapsed to the ground. Officer Gilhooly was shot four times in the forehead, neck and chest. Meanwhile backup had arrived, Patrolmen R. Thompson and Robert Tracy, beat 270, who then called in a 10-1 “Police Officers Shot.“

Responding to the call of a 10-1 were Patrolman Ronald Comparin, 3rd District, Patrolman Daniel Coffman, 3rd District, Patrolman James Dowd, beat 322, Patrolman Donald Miley, beat 317, Patrolman Philip Prerost, 21st District, Patrolman Frank Gershon Rappaport, beat 320 and Patrolman Jack Stewart, 3rd District. Bell and Winters were observed running down Dr. Martin Luther King Drive by responding units. Officers Rappaport and Prerost gave chase on foot and at 5822 South Dr. Martin Luther King Drive, Winters turned and fired his shotgun striking Officer Rappaport. He collapsed to the ground. Officer Prerost, who was running directly behind Officer Rappaport, was then struck as he attempted to take out Winters and was temporarily incapacitated. After shooting Officer Prerost, Winters then shot Officer Rappaport again in the head as he lay on the ground, delivering the fatal shot.

Officer Brady turned the corner just as Winters delivered the fatal shot to Officer Rappaport and opened fire with Officer Prerost. In the ensuing gun battle Winters was killed and Bell was injured, sustaining two gunshot wounds, one to the right arm and one to the leg. Officer Rappaport was transported to Provident Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Carroll at 3:10 a.m. on November 13, 1969. Officer Gilhooley, now paralyzed from his gunshot wounds, was transported to Billings Hospital where he underwent extensive surgery, he was pronounced dead by Dr. Washburn at 12:32 a.m. on November 14, 1969. Officer Brady sustained a laceration to the right forehead, possible graze wound. Officer Comparin sustained a gunshot to the left arm. Officer Coffman sustained gunshots to the left cheek, neck, left shoulder, right upper arm, left nipple and left palm. Officer Dowd sustained minor flesh wounds to the body. Officer Miley sustained gunshots to the right eye, chest and right arm. Officer Prerost sustained gunshots to the right forearm, hand and right foot big toe. Officer Stewart sustained a fracture of the skull. All were hospitalized and later made full recoveries.

Lance Bell was taken into custody at 5322 South Dr. Martin Luther King Drive attempting to flee the scene. He had sustained two gunshot wounds, one to the right arm and one to the leg, during the shootout. On December 19, 1969, Bell was held to the Grand Jury which returned a True Bill on 14 counts inclusing murder, attempt murder and aggravated battery. On November 15, 1973, Bell entered a plea of guilty to two counts of attempted murder and was sentenced to 6 to 20 years in prison by Judge Richard J. Fitzgerald. Bell also pleaded guilty to three counts of aggravated assault and was sentenced to 3 to 9 years. Both sentences were to be served concurrently. Bell would be eligible for parole in 4 years and 9 months. It was believed that Winters was the gunman who killed both officers.

Officer Rappaport was waked at Piser Memorial Chapel located at 6935 South Stoney Island Avenue and he was laid to rest on November 17, 1969 in Cedar Park Cemetery, 12540 South Halsted Street, Calumet Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Frank Gershon Rappaport, born February 1, 1937, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 11, 1966. He earned 3 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Rappaport served in the U.S. Army from June 4, 1954 thru May 23, 1957 and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Constance (nee Fekek) and children: Michael Abraham, age 8, Patricia Ruth, age 3 and Susan Louise, age 10.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #H445751.

The Black Panthers are a racist, radical group that professed the murders of law enforcement officers. Members and former members of the group were responsible for the murders of at least 15 law enforcement officers and the wounding of dozens more across the nation.

Patrolman Henry F. Rauscher

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Jan 1911
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
27 May 1915
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Blunt Trauma
Age:
29
End of Watch:
27 May 1915
Unit of Assignment:
District 25, 42nd Precinct - Town Hall
Date of Birth:
23 Jul 1885
Served:
4 years, 4 months, 20 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
District of Incident Unknown

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Forest Home Cemetery - Forest Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Henry F. Rauscher, Star # Unknown, aged 29 years, was a 4 year, 4 month, 20 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 25, 42nd Precinct - Town Hall.

On May 26, 1915, Officer Rauscher, while in the discharge of his duties, was involved in an incident which he sustained a skull fracture. Officer Rauscher died the following day on May 27, 1915. Further details are unavailable, but Officer Rauscher is listed in the Proceedings of the City Council of the City of Chicago as dying in the discharge of his duties.

Officer Rauscher was waked at his residence located at 4427 North Kenneth Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Forest Home Cemetery and he was laid to rest on May 30, 1915 in Forest Home Cemetery, 863 Desplaines Avenue, Forest Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Henry F. Rauscher, born July 23, 1885, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 7, 1915.

Officer Rauscher was survived by his wife, Florence (nee Brady); parents: Joseph and Margaret (nee Peterson) and siblings: Alma, Marvin and Mrs. Sophie Schaffer.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman Thomas Redden

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Apr 1874
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
621
Incident Date:
04 May 1886
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
49
End of Watch:
17 May 1886
Unit of Assignment:
3rd Precinct - West Lake Street Station
Date of Birth:
09 Jul 1836
Served:
12 years, 1 month, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 19
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 20
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 59-E: 14

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas Redden, Star #621, aged 49 years, was a 12 year, 1 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd Precinct - West Lake Street Station.

On May 4, 1886, Officer Redden was with other officers assigned to disperse protesters near Haymarket Square. A bomb was thrown and exploded amidst the officers. As a result of the bomb blast he was severely wounded by the bomb shrapnel, his left leg being fractured. The explosion was then followed by an intense gun battle. Officer Redden sustained a gunshot wound in the left cheek and right arm. He later died of his injuries. Officer Redden was the sixth of eight officers to die in what history records as the Haymarket Tragedy.

Eight men were arrested and charged with the officers’ murders. Seven were convicted of murder and sentenced to death. The other one was sentenced to 15 years in prison. On November 11, 1887, four of them were executed by hanging. The day before one of the suspects killed himself in his cell with a smuggled dynamite cap, which he detonated in his mouth. The other three were pardoned by Governor John P. Altgeld in 1893.

Nine police officers died after or were killed during the Haymarket Riot labor dispute. The officers were at the scene of a civil disorder when the rioters opened fire and threw a bomb into the crowd. Seven policemen suffered fatal wounds, two policemen suffered serious injury which would later lead to their death and 70 other people were injured by the explosion and ensuing gunfire.

The officers who were killed in or as a result of the Haymarket Riot, in order of their death, include:

  • Patrolman Mathias J. Degan, End of Watch May 4, 1886
  • Patrolman John J. Barrett, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman George F. Miller, End of Watch May 6, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy J. Flavihan, End of Watch May 8, 1886
  • Patrolman Michael Sheehan, End of Watch May 9, 1886
  • Patrolman Nels Hansen, End of Watch May 14, 1886
  • Patrolman Thomas Redden, End of Watch May 16, 1886
  • Patrolman Timothy O'Sullivan, End of Watch June 14, 1888
  • Patrolman Patrick Hartford, End of Watch November 26, 1897

Officer Redden was waked at his residence located at No. 100 Walnut Street (present day 1800 West Walnut Street), , his funeral mass was held at St. Columbkill's Church, and he was laid to rest on May 19, 1886 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas Redden, born July 9, 1836, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 1, 1874.

Officer Redden was survived by his wife, Ann and two children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #1999 and Case #2743.

In response to the tragic events of May 4, 1886 a commemorative nine-foot (2.7 meter) bronze statue of a Chicago policeman was commissioned to honor the sacrifice of the policemen who lost their lives that fateful night. The statue was designed by Frank Batchelder of St. Paul Minnesota in 1889 and sculpted by sculptor Johannes Gelert of New York, New York. The statue's marble pedestal was ordered to have an inscription on it. The inscription is the command that Captain William Ward delivered in the Haymarket just before the bomb was thrown that fateful night: ""In the name of the People of Illinois, I command peace."" The statue was funded by private funds raised by the Union League Club of Chicago. The statue would become the first known monument erected in the United States honoring policemen. Erected in the middle of Haymarket Square located on Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, the statue was unveiled on May 30, 1889. The unveiling was conducted by Frank Degan, the son of Officer Mathias Degan who was killed in the Haymarket Affair. Over the years the statue would be moved seven times, it would also be repaired and rebuilt several times due to vandalism.

  • Location #1 - Haymarket Square (May 30, 1889 thru July, 1900): Haymarket Square was the first location in which the statue would be erected. It was placed in the middle of Randolph Street just west of Desplaines Street, as seen in the image above. The statue interfered with the flow of traffic in this busy area, and it became an object of vandalism. As a result, it was moved in 1900 about one mile west, to Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue, near Union Park.

  • Location #2 - Randolph Street and Ogden Avenue (July, 1900 thru 1928): The statue remained at its second location for just over 27 years. A medallion, which is evident in the photo above, is located just above the inscription. Also visible are two white dots just below the inscription. Those two dots are of the original mounting holes for the medallion. It is believed that due to vandalism, the medallion was moved higher up the monuments pedestal. On May 4, 1927, the 41st anniversary of the Haymarket affair, a Chicago Surface Lines streetcar jumped its tracks and crashed into the statue's pedestal. The force of the crash dislodged the statue from the pedestal and the statue fell over falling off the base. The motorman, William Schultz, of the streetcar stated that the brakes failed as he was rounding the corner. He also later said that he was ""sick of seeing that policeman with his arm raised."" The city restored the statue in 1928 and moved the pedestal and statue into nearby Union Park.

  • Location #3 - Union Park (1928 thru June 2, 1957): The monument was located near Washington Boulevard on the North side of the street facing south and it remained in Union Park for nearly three decades. The finials, which flank the pedestal, had been modified after one of the monument's earlier moves. This change is believed to be the result of vandal damage or from being stripped at various times. During the 1950's, construction of the Kennedy Expressway erased about half of the old, run-down Haymarket Square Area, and on June 2, 1957, the statue was moved to Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway.

  • Location #4 - Randolph Street and the Kennedy Expressway (June 2, 1957 thru February 5, 1972): The Statue was situated on the north side of Randolph Street a block west of Desplaines Street at 700 West Randolph Street, just to the east of the new Kennedy Expressway. A new platform was built to support the pedestal and statue overlooking the expressway, only 200 feet from its original location. After years of vandalism the pedestal was badly stained and chipped as can be seen in the photo above.

    On May 4, 1968, The Haymarket statue was vandalized with black paint, the 82nd anniversary of the Haymarket affair, following a confrontation between police and demonstrators at a protest against the Vietnam War. The city named the monument a historic landmark in the mid-1960’s, but this did not prevent further vandalism, presumably in protest against police brutality in the context of opposition to the Vietnam War and social inequality in the United States. On October 6, 1969, in what was almost certainly a deliberate symbolic reenactment of the original Haymarket meeting, someone placed a powerful explosive between the legs of the statue, blowing out about a hundred windows nearby and sending chunks of the statue's legs onto the expressway below. Weather Underground members, known as Weatherman, took credit for the blast and battled police elsewhere in the streets of Chicago over several days. The statue was rebuilt and unveiled on May 4, 1970.

    The statue was repaired, but early on the morning of October 5, 1970, it was blown up again. The body of the statue badly bent a nearby railing as it fell before settling on the expressway embankment, and one of the legs landed two hundred feet away. Immediately after the blast, a person or persons called various news outlets to declare that the bombing was the work of the Weathermen. According to one newspaper, the caller said, ""We just blew up Haymarket Square Statue for the second year in a row to show our allegiance to our brothers in the New York prisons and our black brothers everywhere. This is another phase of our revolution to overthrow our racist and fascist society. Power to the People."" The two attacks on the police statue were among several politically-motivated bombings throughout the country at the time.

    An angry and determined Mayor Richard J. Daley had the statue repaired again and put under 24 police protection. On February 5, 1972, the statue was moved to the State Street Chicago Police Headquarters Building. The pedestal remained at this location for 24 more years and was finally removed in 1996. It is unknown whether the pedestal was scrapped or placed into storage by the city.

  • Location #5 - State Street Chicago Police Headquarters (February 5, 1972 thru October 5, 1976): On February 5, 1972, the statue was placed on a new marble pedestal located in the lobby of the State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building at 1121 South State Street. The statue remained on display in the headquarters lobby for four years and eight months. On October 5, 1976, the statue was then relocated to the new Chicago Police Training Academy. The State Street Chicago Police Department Headquarters Building has since been razed and a new commercial and residential complex was built in its place.

  • Location #6 - Chicago Police Training Academy (October 5, 1976 thru June 1, 2007): On October 5, 1976, the statue was moved from the Old Chicago Police Headquarters Building and placed on a new granite pedestal, located in a secure outdoor courtyard at the Chicago Police Training Academy located at 1300 West Jackson Street for twenty years.

  • Location #7 - Michigan Avenue Chicago Police Headquarters (June 1, 2007 thru Present): On June 1, 2007 the statue was rededicated at Chicago Police Headquarters located at 3501 South State Street and placed on a new pedestal. The rededication unveiling was conducted by Geraldine Doceka, Officer Mathias Degan's great-granddaughter. The statue currently resides at this location.

Patrolman Harry James Redlich

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
10 Feb 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5406
Incident Date:
08 Jul 1933
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
08 Jul 1933
Unit of Assignment:
27th District - Warren
Date of Birth:
16 Jul 1894
Served:
10 years, 4 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Acacia Park Cemetery - Norridge, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 35
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 38-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman Harry James Redlich, Star #5406, aged 38 years, was a 10 year, 4 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 27th District - Warren.

On July 8, 1933, at approximately 12:00 p.m., Officer Redlich was directing traffic at the intersection of Madison Street and Kedzie Avenue. Mrs. Charlotte Taylor, a secretary for the Thomas W. Compton Advertising Agency located in the Madison-Kedzie Building at 9 South Kedzie Avenue, was in the hallway outside of Room 307 when she saw two robbers get off the elevator, John Bongiorno, age 28 and Ross King, age 34. She watched them enter the advertising agency's office and after she recognized them from an earlier robbery, she sprang into action. Taylor alerted the elevator operator, Steve Jadro, and ran downstairs to the street where she saw Officer Redlich directing traffic. Taylor informed him that the advertising agency was being robbed. Mrs. Taylor stated that the robbers were the same ones that had stolen $90.00 from the agency on June 7, 1933.

Officer Redlich followed Mrs. Taylor back to the agency and observed the robbers in the process of holding up Mr. Compton and Jack Kiefus, a salesman. As Officer Redlich stood outside Room 307, he could see Bongiorno's shadow on the glass of the office door. Redlich drew his revolver and ordered the Bongiorno to step out of the office. Bongiorno came out unarmed and tried to persuade Redlich that he was an insurance agent. Redlich, unconvinced, told the robber to move over by the elevator. While Bongiorno continued to argue about his identity Bongiorno's partner, Ross King, whom Redlich had not seen, took $60.00 in cash and $20.00 in stamps. King jumped from the office window onto a ledge and about ten feet below he crawled back into the building through a second floor window. King then went to the stairwell near where Redlich and Bongiorno were standing. King quietly crept up the stairs and had the drop on Redlich. Officer Redlich's back was to King as he was searching Bongiorno for weapons. Without warning, King opened fire, firing five shots, striking Redlich three times in the back. Redlich collapsed to the floor and died shortly thereafter.

Bongiorno and King fled from the building unharmed, but were apprehended a few hours later. King commandeered a truck driven by Alex Livingston, 4824 West Harrison Street, and ordered him to speed west on Madison Street while holding him at gunpoint. Sergeant John Kratzmeyer and his Detective Bureau squad were on the lookout when they spotted King. The squad attempted to pull the truck over and a vehicle pursuit ensued. Eventually the pursuit would end when Livingston aided in crashing the truck into a garage four blocks west of Kedzie Avenue. King was apprehended and placed into custody. Bongiorno sought refuge in a basement at 3031 West Warren Boulevard. At the same time as the pursuit, Captain John Stege and Sergeant Arthur Madzinski received an anonymous phone call at the Warren Avenue station. The caller stated that “A robber is in the basement at 3031 Warren.” Rushing to the address, they found the basement door barricaded. They broke the door down and Bongiorno immediately surrendered saying “Don’t shoot, I didn’t kill him.” Both men were brought back to the station and questioned by Assistant State’s Attorneys Dougherty and John Long. Both men confessed their roles in the killing.

The offenders, John Bongiorno, alias Joe Lippo, and Ross King, alias Kenneth Smith were both ex-convicts on parole. Bongiorno had served six years for his part in a Chicago hotel hold-up at the Pontiac Reformatory, while King had served six years of a 7 to 15 year sentence at Marquette Prison in Michigan for a robbery conviction. On the same day, July 8, 1933, a special Coroner's Jury turned the two bandits over to the Grand Jury on a charge of Murder. The day after the arrest, an angry public demanded the death penalty be sought during their trials. On July 10, 1933, both men were indicted by a Coroner’s Jury. The two men stood trial and on September 7, 1933 were found guilty by jury trial. On September 18, 1933, Bongiorno was sentenced by Judge Harry B. Miller to the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet for 199 years, where he remained until being paroled in the 1960's. King was the one who would pay the price the public demanded, on September 18, 1993, King was also sentenced by Judge Harry B. Miller to death. On October 16, 1933, at 12:03 a.m., King was executed in the electric chair at Cook County Jail, he was pronounced dead at 12:06 a.m.

Officer Redlich’s was waked at Ramme Funeral Home located at 3918-20 West Irving Park Boulevard, his funeral mass was also held at the Ramme Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on July 11, 1933 in Acacia Park Cemetery, 7800 West Irving Park Road, Norridge, Illinois.

Patrolman Harry James Redlich, born July 16, 1894, received a Temporary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 25, 1919 prior to his Probationary Appointment to the Department on February 10, 1922.

Officer Redlich served in the Armed Forces. He was also a member of the Chicago Police Post No. 207 American Legion and the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. Officer Redlich was survived by his wife, Laura (nee Burrows); daughter, Jacqueline, age 8 and sibling: Bernard, Florence Johnson, Freida Briggs, Gertrude Rogers, Gussie Broder, Herman, Mabel Meeker and the late Amclia, Carl and Mary.

Patrolman Patrick Joseph Redmond

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
25 Mar 1933
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1583
Incident Date:
09 May 1934
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
09 May 1934
Unit of Assignment:
12th District - Kensington
Date of Birth:
13 Feb 1904
Served:
1 year, 1 month, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 19
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 37
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 62-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Patrick Joseph Redmond, Star #1583, aged 30 years, was a 1 year, 1 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 12th District - Kensington.

On May 9, 1934, in the late afternoon, Officer Redmond was assigned to guard a payroll exchange which operated out of a tavern, owned by Frank Ghodotti, located at 644 East 113th Street. Ghodotti had withdrawn more than $2000.00 for the purpose of cashing the payroll checks. Approximately 15 employees from the nearby Pullman Company were in the process of cashing their payroll checks in the backroom of the tavern. In addition to the Pullman employees, Mr. Ghodotti and his wife, Albina, owner of the building, Antonio Fraccaro and his son, Emil, and Officer Redmond were all in the back room when four gunman entered and announced a robbery. “This is a stickup, everybody,” was yelled by one man. Two of the offenders were armed with shotguns. As Officer Redmond confronted the gunmen to place them under arrest, one gunman fired. Officer Redmond was struck by the shotgun blast in the left side of his abdomen. He was also struck in the left arm which shattered it. After being hit, Redmond fell to the floor and simultaneously fired his revolver twice, his bullets missing the bandits and going through the tavern windows. The gunmen then fled the scene without taking any proceeds. Emil Fraccaro, grabbed a shotgun which was hanging on the taverns wall and fired at the gunman as they fled the tavern. Despite his efforts to stop the bandits, his shotgun blast missed and the bandits got into a car and made good their escape.

Officer Redmond was able to give responding officers a description of the offenders before he was transported to Roseland Hospital. Doctors tried their best to save Redmond, giving him blood transfusions. Calls went out citywide to all stations for blood donations. Despite the tremendous response of volunteers, Redmond succumbed to his injuries just three hours after the incident.

Three weeks later one of the four bandits was shot and killed while attempting to rob a bank in South Holland, Illinois.

Officer Redmond was waked at George R. Thompson Funeral Home located at 1008 East 79th Street, his funeral service was held at St. Dorothy Church located at 450 East 78th Street and he was laid to rest on May 11, 1834 in Holy Sepulchre, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman Patrick Joseph Redmond, born February 13, 1904, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 25, 1933.

Officer Redmond was survived by his wife, Dorothy (nee Adams); children: Patricia and Robert; parents: Anna (nee Foley) and John and siblings: Elizabeth and Lambert (CPD).

Patrolman Eugene L. Reid

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Feb 1928
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5408
Incident Date:
07 May 1945
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
46
End of Watch:
07 May 1945
Unit of Assignment:
4th District - Stanton
Date of Birth:
23 Dec 1898
Served:
17 years, 2 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 44
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 57-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman Eugene L. Reid, Star #5408, aged 46 years, was a 17 year, 2 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th District - Stanton.

On May 7, 1945, Officer Reid was working his beat inside the Harlem Liquor Store at 222 East 35th Street conversing with the proprietor, Julius Dinkin. While he was inside, Barney Johnson, age 35, entered the store and forcibly pulled a female patron, Gladys Dawson, age 28, outside the store where a second female, Mattie Richie, was waiting. An argument ensued between the two women and Johnson. Officer Reid, seeing this, went outside and attempted to mediate the argument. Johnson became indigent with Officer Reid’s interruption and drew a gun and fired at the officer. Officer Reid was struck in the groin and was able to return fire. Officer Reid shot Johnson a total of nine times using the two revolvers he carried before succumbing to his own injuries. Both Officer Reid and Johnson were transported to Michael Reese Hospital where they were pronounced dead.

A follow-up investigation into Barney Johnson revealed that Gladys Dawson, Johnson’s common law wife, had filled an official complaint against Johnson on May 2, 1945.

Officer Reid was waked at Charles B. McMinn Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on May 11, 1945 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Eugene L. Reid, born December 23, 1898, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 18, 1928. He earned 2 Credible Mentions during his career.

Patrolman Zollie B. Reiger

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Feb 1954
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5517
Incident Date:
13 Jan 1958
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle (Pursuit)
Age:
30
End of Watch:
13 Jan 1958
Unit of Assignment:
24th District - Lawndale
Date of Birth:
24 Dec 1927
Served:
3 years, 10 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Zollie B. Reiger, Star #5517, aged 30 years, was a 3 year, 10 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 24th District - Lawndale.

On January 13, 1958, Officer Reiger was riding his 3-wheel motorcycle on the 3000 block of South Ogden Avenue about 300 feet west of Sacramento Boulevard when he was fatally injured. The officer was in pursuit of a speeding vehicle on the service drive of Ogden Avenue when his motorcycle was forced over a curb causing him to lose control and strike a tree. Officer Reiger was transported to Mount Sinai Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries.

Chicago Park District Policemen Michael Bolton and Eugene Niziolek were at 2733 South Ogden avenue when a motorcyclist told them that a Cadillac car had struck a motorcycle policeman. The officers responded to the scene and found Officer Reiger lying near his damaged motorcycle. Park Policeman Boltan said Reiger had been driving westbound when he pulled alongside the car and then was forced over a curb as the speeding car crowded him off the street. The car was described as a 1954 or 1955 Cadillac green in color. Police appealed for witnesses to come forward, the driver of the Cadillac has not been identified and is still at large.

Officer Reiger's funeral service was held at Unity Funeral Parlor located at 4114 South Michigan Avenue and he was laid to rest on January 17, 1958 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Zollie B. Reiger, born December 24, 1927, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 16, 1954.

Officer Reiger was survived by his wife, Teresa; mother, Jesse (nee Rosemond) and siblings: Jesse (CPD), Mary Jane and Novel Leon.

On June 25, 2013, Officer Reiger's star was retired by Superintendent Garry McCarthy and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Gilbert Elliot Reynolds

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
11 Oct 1871
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
05 Dec 1877
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly (Accidental)
Age:
37
End of Watch:
05 Dec 1877
Unit of Assignment:
2nd Precinct - Madison Street Station
Date of Birth:
23 Sep 1840
Served:
6 years, 1 month, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Pleasant Cemetery - Lodi, Wisconsin
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Gilbert Elliot Reynolds, Star # Unknown, aged 37 years, was a 6 year, 1 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 2nd Precinct - Madison Street Station.

On December 5, 1877, at 6:50 a.m., Officer Reynolds and Patrolman Thomas Brennock were tending to their uniforms prior to the beginning of their shift. The officers were in a room at the rear of the West Madison Street Station. Officer Reynolds was brushing his boots while Officer Brennock brushed his pants. As Officer Brennock put his foot on the bench beside Officer Reynolds, his service revolver fell from his overcoat pocket and struck the floor. Upon striking the floor the pistol discharged and the round struck Patrolman Reynolds in the abdomen, penetrating the base of his left lung. Officer Reynolds fell backwards and exclaimed that he was shot. The City Physician, Doctor Dunne, was immediately summoned to the police station and attended to Officer Reynolds. However, little could be done for him and he died four hours later at 10:30 a.m. He was conscious to the very end all the while repeatedly and emphatically exonerating Officer Brennock from all blame.

Officer Reynolds was waked at his residence located at No. 294 West Van Buren Street (present day 1025 West Van Buren Street), and he was laid to rest in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, City of Lodi, Columbia County, Wisconsin.

Patrolman Gilbert Elliot Reynolds, born September 23, 1840, received his Probationary appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 15, 1871.

Officer Reynolds served in the Confederate States of America Army in the 23rd West Virginia Infantry Battalion, was a veteran of the Civil War (aka War of Rebellion) and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife; daughter, age 12; parents: Hannah C. Elliot and Sylvester and siblings: Albert N. and Ida S.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman Patrick Rierdon

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 May 1883
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
17 Jun 1905
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Train
Age:
64
End of Watch:
17 Jun 1905
Unit of Assignment:
District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards
Date of Birth:
1841
Served:
22 years, 1 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Patrick Rierdon, Star # Unknown, aged 64 years, was a 22 year, 1 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 8, 19th Precinct - Stock Yards

On June 17, 1905, Officer Rierdon was on patrol as a watchman when a train struck him at 41st Street and Stewart Avenue. Officer Rierdon was directing a group of workman at the crossing when he jumped onto the northbound tracks to avoid a southbound train. Unfortunately Pennsylvania Freight Engine train was headed northbound and he was struck. He was rushed to Mercy Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries one hour later.

Patrolman Patrick Rierdon, born in 1841, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 1, 1883.

Officer Rierdon was waked at his residence located at 5141 South Princeton Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Ann’s Church located at 1840 South Leavitt Street and he was laid to rest on June 20, 1905 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Officer Rierdon was survived by his children: Cecilia, Daniel, Dennis, Elizabeth, James, Margaret and Mary. He was preceded in death by his wife, Catherine.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Sergeant Walter J. Riley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
25 May 1916
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
266
Incident Date:
26 Oct 1926
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
35
End of Watch:
26 Oct 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 31 - Town Hall
Date of Birth:
01 Jul 1891
Served:
10 years, 5 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1-E: 7

Incident Details:

Sergeant Walter J. Riley, Star #266, aged 35 years, was a 10 year, 5 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 31 - Town Hall.

On October 26, 1926, Sergeant Riley and Sergeants Thomas Alcock and George Hennesy, were driving in a squad car responding to a report of a riot at the Grayland Theater located at 3940 North Cicero Avenue. While en route his squad car collided with another automobile owned by Cecil Chapel. The violent impact resulted in Sergeant Riley sustaining fatal injuries. Sergeant Riley died at the scene. Sergeants Thomas Alcock and George Hennesy were also seriously injured, but later recovered.

The car crash was an indirect result of the attempted murder of Samuel Werthelmer. The owner of the Grayland Theater, Albert Schmidt, was a very angry man who held onto grudges. Schmidt had a grudge against Samuel Werthelmer who was the previous owner of the theater. On the night of Sergeant Riley’s death, Schmidt invited Werthelmer to the theater with a false premise. Schmidt pretended to be eager to learn how the theatres ventilation system operated and asked Werthelmer if he could show him. As Werthelmer was looking over the system, Schmidt drew a concealed revolver from his suit and fired twice at Werthelmer as he tried to run. Werthelmer sustained a gunshot to his arm and leg; thinking he was dead, Schmidt turned the gun on himself and committed suicide. During the commotion, theater patrons heard the gunfire and began to riot in response. This is what led to police being notified of a riot at the theater. Seven squad cars were dispatched to the theater to quell the melee.

Sergeant Riley was waked at his father’s residence located at 2541 West Argyle Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Sebastian Church located at 3021 West Dayton Street and he was laid to rest on October 30, 1926 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Sergeant Walter J. Riley, born July 1, 1891, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 25, 1916. He earned 5 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $360.00 during his career.

Sergeant Riley was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Bertha (nee Reynolds); father, James A. and siblings: Alice A., Florence, William J. and the late Hugh T.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Ironically, Sergeant Riley's star number was previously issued to Sergeant Timothy S. O'Connell, who was also killed in the Line of Duty on May 8, 1900.

James John Riordan Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
10 Oct 1947
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
103
Incident Date:
06 Jun 1981
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
57
End of Watch:
06 Jun 1981
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services: Unit 141 - Office of the First Deputy Superintendent
Date of Birth:
20 Oct 1923
Served:
33 years, 4 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 35
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 48-E: 10

Incident Details:

First Deputy Police Superintendent James John Riordan, Sr., Star #103, aged 57 years, was a 33 year, 4 month, 4 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services: Unit 141 - Office of the First Deputy Superintendent.

On June 6, 1981, at 9:27 p.m., First Deputy Riordan was unarmed and off duty at Lattner's Restaurant in Marina City located at 300 North State Street. He was at the bar with another man and two women. According to eyewitnesses, Leon F. Washington, age 35, of 220 East Garfield Boulevard was intoxicated and harassing restaurant patrons, specifically women. First Deputy Riordan intervened when Washington, a former Davenport, Iowa police officer, harassed one of his dinner companions. As First Deputy Riordan was escorting Washington into a corridor beside the restaurant, Washington produced a .380 caliber Walther PPK semiautomatic handgun and shot First Deputy Riordan four times, twice in the neck, once in the right shoulder and once in the upper chest. First Deputy Riordan fell into the fountain in the hallway as Washington began to flee down the hallway. Bystanders had called 911 to report the shots fired. Tactical officers on beat 164B, Patrolman D. Barnes and L. Boston, responded to the call of a man shot at 300 North State Street. Upon arrival the officers were directed by numerous witnesses to the hallway which led eastward from the restaurant to an exit located at State Street. At the east end of the hallway the officers observed Washington standing next to a pillar and placed him in custody after witnesses identified him as the person who shot First Deputy Riordan. First Deputy Riordan was transported to Northwestern Memorial Hospital by CFD Ambulance #42 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Fredrickson at 11:54 p.m. on June 6, 1981. He died as the result of Injuries during surgery.

Leon Washington was arrested. He stood trial, found guilty and sentenced to 35 years in prison.

First Deputy Superintendent Riordan was waked at Lain-Hursen Funeral Home located at 6125 North Clark Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Gertrude's Catholic Church located at 1420 West Granville Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 10, 1981 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

First Deputy Superintendent James John Riordan, Sr., born October 20, 1923, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 10, 1947. Upon his appointment he was issued Star #7712. On June 3, 1954 he was promoted to Sergeant, Star #757. On April 16, 1956 he was promoted to Lieutenant, Star #232. On June 15, 1962 he was promoted to Captain, Star #103. In November 1962 he was promoted to District Commander of the 1st District and held that position until June 1, 1969. During the 1968 Democratic National Convention he held the position of Field Marshall. On June 1, 1969 he was promoted to Deputy Chief of the Traffic Division and held that position until May 16, 1970. On May 16, 1970 he was promoted to Chief of Patrol and demoted to Deputy Chief of the Traffic Division four months later on April 16, 1974. He held that position until September 16, 1978 when he was moved as Deputy Chief of the Patrol Division, Area 5 and held that position until June 1, 1979. On June 1, 1979 he was once again promoted to Chief of Patrol. On August 1, 1979 he was promoted to First Deputy Superintendent of Police.

First Deputy Superintendent Riordan served in the U.S. Navy from 1942 thru April 13, 1946, was a veteran of World War II and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Machinists Mate Second Class. He was survived by his wife, Loretta (nee Flynn); children: Elizabeth Anne, age 23, James John, Jr. (CPD), age 32, John Kevin, age 16, Joseph Emmet, age 23, Michael Allen (CPD), age 24, Patrick Francis, age 30 and William Michael, age 33; brother, Thomas (Civilian CPD) and four sisters. Five of his children became police officers.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #C206275.

In June of 1981, the Chicago Police Headquarters Building located at 1121 South State Street was renamed in Riordan's honor.

Patrolman Anthony N. Rizzato Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Sep 1966
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12407
Incident Date:
17 Jul 1970
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
17 Jul 1970
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Field Services - Patrol Division: Unit 056 - Area 6 Task Force
Date of Birth:
19 Jul 1932
Served:
3 years, 9 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 21-W: 2

Incident Details:

Patrolman Anthony N. Rizzato, Sr., Star #12407, aged 37 years, was a 3 year, 9 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Field Services - Patrol Division: Unit 056 - Area 6 Task Force.

On July 17, 1970, Sergeant James Louis Severin and Sergeant Ed Wodnicki met in the 18th District Tactical Unit Office before they proceeded to Cabrini with their respective teams to engage in the “Walk & Talk“ program. A previous day’s confrontation necessitated having an additional person on Sergeant Wodnicki's team for the day. As fate would have it, Officer Rizzato's brother Nickalos, who was also a policeman, was assigned to Sergeant Wodnicki's team. What followed was a vicious calculated murder of Patrolman Rizzato and Sergeant Severin.

Officer Rizzato and Sergeant Severin were volunteers for the Chicago Police Department's “Walk & Talk“ project. The program was designed to cultivate community relations between Chicago Police Officers and residents of the Cabrini-Green housing complex. On July 17, 1970, the officers became victims of sniper fire as they walked across the Seward Park baseball field at Cabrini-Green. Officer Rizzato and Sergeant Severin were shot in their backs by high-powered rifles which erupted from two CHA buildings. The purpose of the shooting was to seal a pact between two rival gangs. Patrolmen Dennis Jurkowski, Bob Sargus, Curtis Crisler, and Sergeant Edward Stetter drove into the middle of the baseball field under a hail of sniper fire to recover the bodies of their fellow officers. Officer Rizzato and Sergeant Severin were transported to Henrotin Hospital where they were pronounced dead on arrival.

Four people were charged and arrested for the officers' murders, George C. Knight, age 23; Johnnie Veal, age 18; Vernon R. Baker, age 14; Sidney Bennett, Jr., age 18. Knight and Veal were both found guilty of 1st degree murder and were each sentenced to 100 to 199 years in prison. In 1972, Baker's charges were dropped. Bennett confessed to the murders, but was deemed mentally unfit to stand trial. In 1975, Bennett shot and killed a man while working as an armed security guard. He pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter and was sentenced to 1 to 5 years in prison.

Officer Rizzato was waked at Drake & Sons Funeral Home located at 5303 North Western Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Queen of Angels Catholic Parish located at 2330 West Sunnyside Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 22, 1970 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Patrolman Anthony N. Rizzato, Sr., born July 19, 1932, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 19, 1966. He earned 1 Award of Valor (posthumously) and 1 Blue Star Award (posthumously) during his career.

Officer Rizzato served in the U.S. Army from May 29, 1951 thru May 28, 1954, was a veteran of the Korean War and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Rosarina (nee Russo); children: Anthony N., Jr., age 6 and Rose, age 10 and siblings: Lucille McCauslin, JoAnn Aiello, Nickalos (CPD) and Rosemarie Plescia.

In June 1981, a new sports complex in the Cabrini-Green Homes complex located at Division and Orleans Streets was named in honor of Officer Rizzato and Sergeant Severin.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #J298263.

Patrolman Michael Anthony Robbins Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
11 Aug 1986
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4203
Incident Date:
10 Sep 1994
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
57
End of Watch:
13 Sep 2008
Unit of Assignment:
3rd District - Grand Crossing
Date of Birth:
03 Jun 1951
Served:
22 years, 1 Month, 2 Days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 13
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 31-W: 27

Incident Details:

Patrolman Michael Anthony Robbins, Star #4203, aged 57 years, was a 22 year, 1 Month, 2 Day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd District - Grand Crossing Gang Team.

On September 10, 1994, at 7:45 p.m., Officer Robbins and his partner, Patrolman Talmitch A. Jackson, age 35, were investigating a shooting involving two rival gangs that occurred earlier in the evening. They were driving in their unmarked squad car in the alley on the 6500 block of South Langley Avenue. As they drove slowly down the dark alley with their lights off, Claude McGee, age 19, walked up to Officer Robbins and stuck a gun in his face. Officer Robbins grabbed for the pistol. As the men wrestled for control of the gun, the gang member squeezed the trigger, firing 13 shots. Officer Robbins bulletproof vest stopped three of them. He was shot 11 times in the chest, abdomen, both arms and legs and once in the back. Officer Jackson was shot four times and transported to Cook County Hospital where he made a recovery. Officer Jackson returned to light duty, but had undergone seven surgeries by early 1995. Officer Robbins was also transported to Cook County Hospital where he underwent surgery. Three bullets were unable to be removed and remained lodged in his heart. The injuries Officer Robbins sustained forced him onto the Disability Pension Roll (DPR) for the remainder of his career. At the time of the shooting, Officer Robbins had served 8 years, he hadn't officially retired from the department at the time of his death on September 13, 2008.

Claude McGee, a parolee who had done time for attempted murder in Michigan, was arrested in Jackson, Mississippi, and charged with attempted murder in the shooting. In 1997, McGee was tried, convicted and was sentenced to 120 years in prison prior to Officer Robbins death.

Mr. Robbins spoke about the shooting at the 1996 Democratic convention, urging better gun control laws. He directed the Handgun Epidemic Lowering Plan, an organization for survivors of gun violence, and ran for Illinois State Senator in 1999. He continued to work as a community activist, serving as a victims advocate for Fight Crime: Invest in Kids and as a member of the Black on Black Love Organization.

Officer Robbins succumbed to complications from gunshot wounds he sustained 14 years earlier and was found dead in his apartment as a result of those injuries on September 13, 2008. He was transported to the Stein Institute where he was pronounced dead at 12:40 a.m.

Officer Robbins was waked at A.A. Raynor and Sons South located at 318 East 71st Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Columbanus Catholic Church, located at 331 East 71st Street and he was laid to rest on September 20, 2008 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Michael A. Robbins, born June 3, 1951, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 11, 1986. He earned 1 Carter Harrison Medal during his career.

Officer Robbins served in the U.S. Navy and was a veteran of the Vietnam War and a recipient of a Bronze Star. He also served in the U.S. Navy Reserve after his discharge from the Navy. Officer Robbins was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his ex-wife, Pamela (nee Brooks); Children: Michael Anthony, Jr. (USAF), age 12, Michael Christopher Keith Threlkeld, age 15 and Michelle Lorraine Miles, age 13; stepson, Lawrence A. Willis; two grandchildren and brother, Robert Bradley.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #Y422287 Aggravated Battery and HP568533 Death Investigation.

On March 2, 2010, Officer Robbins' star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman William A. Roberts

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
25 Aug 1916
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3566
Incident Date:
14 May 1920
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
14 May 1920
Unit of Assignment:
District 5, 5th Precinct - Hyde Park
Date of Birth:
06 Aug 1889
Served:
3 years, 8 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 1
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 61-E: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman William A. Roberts, Star #3566, aged 30 years, was a 3 year, 9 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 5, 5th Precinct - Hyde Park.

On May 14, 1920, at 1:51 a.m., Officer Roberts observed a suspicious man, Horace Le Roy Walton, carrying a handbag. Unknown to the officer, Walton had just robbed the SanteFe Express an Illinois Central Railroad mail car in Kankakee while it was en route from New Orleans to Chicago. He had jumped onto the mail car as the train was pulling out of Kankakee, Illinois and held four mail clerks at gunpoint. When the train reached Chicago he jumped from the mail car in the Englewood neighborhood taking a Decatur mail satchel with him. When Officer Roberts attempted to question the man in front of 5052 South Drexel Boulevard as to the contents of the handbag, the man drew a revolver and opened fire. Officer Roberts was knocked to the ground and returned fire. A gun battle ensued, in which Officer Roberts was mortally wounded. The gun battle ended when Walton ran out of bullets and fled the scene making good his escape. Officer Roberts continued firing at Walton as he fled despite being hit in the head and side. Walton fled Westbound on 51st Street to Cottage Grove Avenue, dropping the satchel in the process, where he flagged down a taxi. A passing motorist stopped after hearing the gunfire and took Officer Roberts to Washington Park Hospital. He lingered there succumbing to his wounds 8 hours later at 10:30 a.m.

Before Officer Roberts passed away, he was able to give a full account of the events which had taken his life. He stated that he and the gunman exchanged ten shots. The satchel that Walton had dropped was recovered and contained $500,000.00. Witnesses who had seen Walton flee the scene filled in the rest. Officers were able to trace Walton to a residence located at 816 East 51st Street, in which he had a room, early the following morning. On May Officers surrounded the boarding house and Walton was besieged (shot) and killed by police officers at 3:15 a.m. in the ensuing gun battle.

Officer Roberts was waked at his residence located at 7431 South Ingleside Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Laurence Catholic Church located at 7140 South Dorchester Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 17, 1920 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman William A. Roberts, born August 6, 1889, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 25, 1916. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Roberts was survived by his wife, Anne; children: Anna, Arthur, John, Lucille and Margaret; parents: Arthur M. and Catherine (nee Clancy) and siblings: Ira J. and John H.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #4965.

Detective Clayton Robinson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Aug 1962
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6166
Incident Date:
25 Oct 1968
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
39
End of Watch:
26 Oct 1968
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Field Services - Detective Division: Unit 066 - Area 6 Robbery Section
Date of Birth:
05 Feb 1929
Served:
6 years, 2 months, 13 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 19-E: 8

Incident Details:

Detective Clayton Robinson, Star #6166, aged 39 years, was a 6 year, 2 month, 13 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Field Services - Detective Division: Unit 066 - Area 6 Robbery Section.

On October 25, 1968, at 11:15 p.m., Detective Robinson pulled over in his unmarked squad car on the Northeast corner of Blackhawk Street and Larrabee Avenue. The detective then began speaking to George Lee Robinson, age 23, of 541 West Blackhawk Street, as he stood beside the squad car in the street. George Robinson was intoxicated and causing a disturbance at the above location which is why the detective pulled over to talk to him. Detective Robinson ordered George to go home at which time he began yelling profanities at the detective. George then stepped onto the sidewalk as Detective Robinson began to drive off. George then stepped off the curb and into the path of Detective Robinson's car. At this time Detective Robinson stopped the car and opened the door, ordering George to go home one last time. George refused and began yelling profanities again. At this time Detective Robinson grabbed the two-way radio in the car and requested a squadrol to his location. George had now walked over to the opposite side of the street. Detective Robinson then exited his squad car and approached George to place him in custody. George began to resist arrest and a tussle ensued. Detective Robinson was able to gain control by drawing his service revolver and held it on George.

While waiting for the squadrol to arrive three male youths, between the ages of 18 and 21, approached the detective. They told him that they knew George and that he should let him go as they would hold him. Detective Robinson informed them that George was under arrest, but then holstered his weapon and allowed the youths to hold George and lift him from the ground. At this time George switched from yelling profanities at the detective to the three youths as they attempted to lift him. George began berating the youths about holding him. The view of George was obstructed by the three youths and Detective Robinson was unable to view George's actions as he was standing up. George suddenly pulled a .22 caliber Rohm Revolver from his pants pocket and shoved one of the youths out of the way. He took aim at the detective and fired at point blank range striking Detective Robinson in the left eye, the bullet coming to rest at the back of the skull. As George was firing two Task Force officers, Patrolmen Michael Gedmin and Ronald Uselton, had just arrived on scene. As the Task Force officers exited their squad car, they observed George Robinson pull a gun from his back pocket and shoot Detective Robinson. The officers then drew their weapons and yelled “Police.“ The gunman turned towards them and they opened fire shooting George Robinson twice in the chest. The three youths then fled the scene. Detective Robinson was transported to Henrotin Hospital by beat 1870 and was pronounced dead by Dr. Co. at 1:30 a.m. on October 26, 1968. George Robinson was also taken to Henrotin Hospital where he died from his wounds later the same day.

Detective Robinson was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Joseph Parish Church located at 4821 South Hermitage Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 30, 1968 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Detective Clayton Robinson, born February 5, 1929, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 13, 1962. He earned 1 Award of Valor (posthumously), 1 Blue Star Award (posthumously) and 14 Honorable Mentions during his career. On May 12, 1966, he was promoted to Detective.

Detective Robinson was survived by his wife, Mamie Louise, age 38; children: Annette, age 17, Deborah, age 11, Michael, age 16 and Randy, age 15 and parents: Beatrice (nee Henley) and Ernest Robinson.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #G412147.

Probationary Patrolman Philip L. Robinson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Jun 1887
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
777
Incident Date:
31 Aug 1887
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
05 Sep 1887
Unit of Assignment:
3rd Precinct - Desplaines Street Station
Date of Birth:
1858
Served:
3 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 21
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 34-E: 8

Incident Details:

Probationary Patrolman Philip L. Robinson, Star #777, aged 29 years, was a 3 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd Precinct - Desplaines Street Station.

On August 31, 1887, Officer Robinson was on duty when he was met by two citizens. The citizens stated that a man named Chow Lam had fired a gun at them. Officer Robinson began to look for Lam when he observed him fleeing and immediately took up the pursuit. At the Sangamon Street Viaduct near 16th and Halsted Street, Officer Robinson ordered Lam to halt. In response, Lam turned and fired three times at the officer. With all three rounds missing Officer Robinson, he returned fire and continued the chase. Lam then fired a final shot, striking the officer. Officer Robinson was taken to Cook County Hospital where he remained conscious but to weak to talk up until his death. He died five days later at 11:00 p.m. on September 5, 1887 with his wife and two brother officers at his bedside.

Chow Lam was later arrested and sat trembling in his cell at the West Chicago Avenue Station. Lam was convinced that he would be taken out of his cell and hanged before he could appear in court. He was also concerned by the fact that as a Chinaman he would have his head shaved once in prison. This would remove his sacred “queue,” the long braided plait of hair that was essential for men in the Chines culture. Without it he would be barred from any entrance into paradise. Lam stood trial and was acquitted. He claimed he had fired on Officer Robinson on the supposition that the officer was one of a gang of hoodlums who had been abusing him.¬¬¬

Officer Robinson was laid to rest in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Probationary Patrolman Philip L. Robinson, born in 1858, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 4, 1887.

Officer Robinson was survived by his wife and two children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2004.

Patrolman Thomas Pjilip Romano

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
17 Jun 1941
Death Classification:
Does Not Apply
Star #:
221
Incident Date:
03 May 1942
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile (Pursuit)
Age:
33
End of Watch:
03 May 1942
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
19 Nov 1908
Served:
0 years, 10 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
016 - Jefferson Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Philip Thomas Romano, Sr., Star #221, aged 33 years, was a 0 year, 10 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On May 3, 1942, Officer Romano, was on duty chasing a motorist for speeding. He was riding Northeast on Forest Preserve Drive when his motorcycle crashed head on with a car driven by Raymond Gustafson, age 25, of 5958 West Grace Street. Mr. Gustafson was coming from the opposite direction and began to turn left onto North Olcott Avenue coming directly into the path of Officer Thomas. Officer Romano struck the front end of the car and was ejected from his motorcycle. He was still conscious after the crash and while at the hospital reported to fellow officers the story of chasing the speeder who made good his escape. Officer Thomas was transported to Belmont Hospital where he was pronounced dead on May 3, 1942.

Officer Romano was laid to rest on May 7, 1942 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road #4, Hillside, Illinois. His grave is located in Lot 16, Block E, Section Y.

Patrolman Romano Philip Thomas, Sr., born November 19, 1908, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 17, 1941. Prior to joining the Department he served as a State Highway Policeman and a Criminal Court Bailiff.

Officer Romano was survived by his wife, Inez Pearl (nee Jett), age 33; children: Clara Pauline, age 11, Elizabeth Ann, age 6, Mary Phyllis, age 13, Philip Thomas Romano, Jr., age 8 and Virginia Henrietta, age 14; father, Isidoro; step-mother, LaVinia (nee Rason); siblings: Carmella Ziglar, Ignatius Robert, Isadore Andrew, Jean Virginia, Lillian Santa Gott, Joseph, Mary Magnus, Samuel and step-sister, Cora Ellen Eicholz. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Patricia J, age 0 months and mother Vincenza (nee Abborino).

Patrolman William J. Rosenstreter

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Oct 1913
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3980
Incident Date:
06 Nov 1914
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
06 Nov 1914
Unit of Assignment:
District 23, 38th Precinct - East Chicago
Date of Birth:
13 Oct 1885
Served:
1 year, 1 month, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Eden Cemetery - Schiller Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 1
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 44
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 23-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman William J. Rosenstreter, Star #3980, aged 29 years, was a 1 year, 1 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 23, 38th Precinct - East Chicago.

On November 6, 1914, at 1:10 a.m., Officer Rosenstreter and his partner, Patrolman Edward Baynes, were working in plainclothes. They responded to a disturbance at Goldman Brothers’ Saloon located at 500 North State Street. While enroute, they heard the sound of glass break at Kinzie and State Streets. Upon arrival they observed an intoxicated man, Charles Williams, attempting to enter through a hole in the glass door of the saloon. In the company of Williams were Edward Carey and Mrs. Bessie Fallon. Williams and his friends had spent the day drinking at the saloon. As Officer Rosenstreter attempted to arrest Williams, he turned around and placed a revolver within three inches of the officer's neck. Williams pulled the trigger and Officer Rosenstreter fell to the ground unconscious. Williams then began to flee on foot he fired twice at Officer Baynes. Officer Baynes gave chase and at Illinois and State Streets he overtook Williams after Williams had stopped in an attempt to fire again. Williams was unable to fire again as Officer Baynes knocked the revolver out of his hand and then beat him unconscious with the butt of his revolver. Carey and Fallon fled the scene shortly after the shooting. Officer Rosenstreter was rushed to Passavant Hospital where he died four hours later as a result of his injuries.

Williams was transported to the station and processed. On November 7, 1914, the Coroner held Williams to the Grand Jury. Edward Carey and Bessie Fallon were later arrested and held. On September 15, 1915, Williams was acquitted by Judge Barrett.

Officer Rosenstreter was waked at his residence located at 1032 North Massasoit Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Eden Cemetery and he was laid to rest in Eden Cemetery, 9851 West Irving Park Road, Schiller Park, Illinois.

Patrolman William J. Rosenstreter, born October 13, 1885, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 9, 1913.

Officer Rosenstreter was survived by his father, John and siblings: Augusta, Emil, Julia and Minnie.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #4888.

Page 1 Page 2