LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

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1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Police Officer Nathaniel L. Taylor Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 Jul 1994
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7322
Incident Date:
28 Sep 2008
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
39
End of Watch:
28 Sep 2008
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Investigative Services - Organized Crime Division: Unit 189 - Organized Crime
Date of Birth:
13 Jun 1969
Served:
14 years, 2 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 12
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 7-E: 26

Incident Details:

Police Officer Nathaniel L. Taylor, Jr., Star #7322, aged 39 years, was a 14 year, 2 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Investigative Services - Organized Crime Division: Unit 189 - Organized Crime.

On September 28, 2008, at 5:32 a.m., Officer Nathaniel Taylor, and his partner, Officer Lemornet Miller, were working the second watch. They were conducting surveillance outside of a home located at 7920 South Clyde Avenue in order to execute a search warrant. The officers were tasked with monitoring the house until Calumet Area narcotics officers arrived to execute the search warrant. The owner of the home, Lamar Cooper, age 37, unexpectedly returned to his home. The officers radioed their supervisor and notified him that Cooper had arrived. They were given permission to stop and detain Cooper before he entered the home. Officer Taylor was approximately six feet away from Cooper's open door window when he shouted, “Police. Put your hands up!“ Cooper drew his weapon and shot Officer Taylor in the head and chest. Officer Miller returned gunfire and struck Cooper. Officer Taylor was transported to Advocate Christ Medical Center by CFD Ambulance #22 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Doherty at 6:02 p.m. on September 28, 2008.

Lamar Cooper was arrested and stood trial. He found guilty and convicted of 1st degree murder and several narcotics charges. On March 26, 2012, Cooper was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. The felon had previously been convicted of the attempted murder of a police officer for which he had only served six years in prison.

Officer Lewis was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, his funeral mass was also held at St. Bede Catholic Church located at 8300 South Kostner Avenue and he was laid to rest on January 5, 2012 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Section 7.

Police Officer Nathaniel L. Taylor, Jr., born June 13, 1969, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 5, 1994 and was in Recruit Class 94-4B at the Jackson Street Police Academy. He earned 7 Department Commendations, 1 Arnold Mireless Special Partnership Award, 1 Special Commendation, 1 Problem Solving Award, 37 Honorable Mentions, 7 Complimentary Letters and 1 Other Award during his career. He worked in the 7th District where he became a tactical officer and in 1998 transferred to the Organized Crime Division.

Officer Taylor served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1987 thru March 1991, was a veteran of Operation Desert Shield / Storm and was Honorably Discharged at the Rank of Private First Class. He also served in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve from March 1991 thru February 8, 2004 and was Honorably Discharged at the Rank of Corporal. Officer Taylor was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Alcione Dias (nee Ribeiro); daughter, Naomi Sierra-Ruth, age 5 and siblings: Harriet Edward, James Edwards and Patricia Evereth.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HP597541.

On November 8, 2012, the 4300 block of South Homan Avenue was dedicated as “Honorary Officer Nathaniel Taylor Way.” The honorary street sign was placed on the northeast corner of 77th Street and Homan Avenue in the Ashburn neighborhood.

Patrolman Paul G. Thomas Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 May 1955
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5620
Incident Date:
04 Nov 1970
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
43
End of Watch:
20 Nov 1970
Unit of Assignment:
6th District - Gresham
Date of Birth:
08 Apr 1927
Served:
15 years, 6 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
022 - Morgan Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Casimir Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 23
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 63-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman Paul G. Thomas, Jr., Star #5620, aged 43 years, was a 15 year, 6 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 6th District - Gresham.

On November 4, 1970, at 6:00 p.m., Officer Thomas was off duty visiting his parent's newspaper distribution agency located at 556 West 103rd Street. Officer Thomas was in the front office with his mother, Stella, chatting. His father went to the bathroom located in the backroom of the news agency. A male black offender entered through the rear door and encountered Thomas, Sr. He displayed a .38 caliber blue steel revolver and announced a robbery. Hearing the voices coming from the backroom, Officer Thomas went to investigate. A struggle ensued between Officer Thomas' father and the armed offender. Officer Thomas came upon the struggle and attempted to aide his father when a second offender entered the rear door. At this time the struggle continued and shots were fired. The offender had fired two to three shots and Officer Thomas fired three shots. Officer Thomas was shot in the lower left chest with the bullet exiting the lower right back. He was also shot in the ring finger of his right and in the right thigh six inches above the knee. The offenders then fled out the door they came in and fled east down the alley making good their escape. They were joined by a third offender, the lookout, as they fled. Help was summoned and Officer Thomas was transported to Roseland Community Hospital and was subsequently transferred to Presbyterian St. Luke Hospital. He underwent surgery and was admitted to the intensive care unit in fair condition. He remained in Presbyterian St. Luke Hospital and later developed an infection related to his injuries. The infection caused a high fever and internal bleeding leading to his death. He was pronounced dead by Dr. Siegert at 7:10 p.m. on November 20, 1970.

In 1972, Thomas' father recognized the two men after their pictures appeared in a newspaper article. The men, Otis Haywood, age 17, of 3617 South Federal Street and Alphonso L. Newman, age 18, of 3615 South Federal Street, were arrested for the murder of a 22-year-old restaurant manager. On April 28, 1972, Mr. Thomas and his wife identified Alphonso Newman as the gunman during a police line-up conducted at the Criminal Courts Building. Mr. Thomas also identified Otis Haywood as Newman's accomplice in the same lineup.

Alphonso Newman and Otis Haywood were charged with Murder and Aggravated Battery. On May 30, 1973, the case against Haywood was Nolle Prossed by Judge Strayhorn. On June 6, 1973, Newman was found not guilty by Judge Strayhorn.

Officer Thomas was waked at Leonard Funeral Home located at 10821 South Michigan Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Helena of the Cross Church located at 10115 South Parnell Avenue and he was laid to rest on November 24, 1970 in St. Casimir Cemetery, 4401 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Paul G. Thomas, Jr., born April 8, 1927, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in May 1, 1955. He earned 3 Complimentary Letters during his career.

Officer Thomas served in the U.S. Army from February 14, 1945 thru March 24, 1947 and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Barbara Julia (nee Saxinger); children: Connie, June, Paul, Jr. III and Tina; parents: Paul G., Sr. and Stella (nee Resk) and siblings: Diane and Ronald W.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #J475836.

Patrolman George W. Thompson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
28 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2009
Incident Date:
14 Nov 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
14 Nov 1925
Unit of Assignment:
District 2 - Pekin Inn
Date of Birth:
10 Oct 1893
Served:
3 years, 0 months, 17 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery - Glenwood, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 15
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 42-E: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman George W. Thompson, Star #2009, aged 32 years, was a 3 year, 0 month, 17 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2 - Pekin Inn.

On November 14, 1925, at 11:00 p.m., Officer Thompson and his partner, Patrolman Napoleon Sutton, were working their regular beat when they observed two suspicious men, Floyd Battle and Claude Huddleston, on 30th Street between Dearborn and Federal Streets. The officers stopped Battle and Huddleston and asked them where they were going as they flashed their stars. It was at this moment, the two men became nervous and drew revolvers, firing at the officers. Battle shot Officer Thompson causing him to fall within seconds but Thompson was able to continue firing. After Thompson fell, Battles was shot by Officer Sutton and killed, he to collapsing to the ground. Seeing his compatriot fall, Huddleston surrendered and was taken into custody by Officer Sutton. Officer Thompson sustained a fatal gunshot wound and died in the exchange.

Officer Thompson was laid to rest in Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery, 18301 South Glenwood Thornton Road, Glenwood, Illinois.

On November 16, 1925, Huddleston was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. On March 6, 1926, he was acquitted by Judge Gemmill.

Patrolman George W. Thompson, born October 10, 1893, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 28, 1922. He earned 3 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $180.00 during his career.

Officer Thompson was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #9135.

Park Policeman Spencer Thornton Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Park District Police Department
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
327
Incident Date:
03 Sep 1945
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
03 Sep 1945
Unit of Assignment:
South Section
Date of Birth:
31 Aug 1908
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 44
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 54-E: 3

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Spencer Thornton, Jr., Star #327, aged 37 years, was a veteran of the Chicago Park District Police Department, assigned to the South Section.

On September 3, 1945, Officer Thornton, Jr. was on duty at the 2nd Ward Democratic Picnic being held at the 31st Street Beach. While patrolling the event, he intervened in a quarrel between two men, James Coppage, age 44 and Will Robinson, age 45. Coppage produced a handgun and opened fire, killing Officer Thornton and Robinson. Two other police officers, Patrolman Edward Hall of the 8th District - Chicago Lawn station and Park Policeman Joseph Ryan who had also been assigned to the picnic heard the gunfire and rushed to the scene. They returned fire and shot Coppage in the face, shoulder and side. Officer Thornton was rushed to Michael Reese Hospital where he died shortly after his arrival from his wounds. Coppage was arrested and taken to Michael Reese Hospital before being transferred to the Bridewell Hospital where he recovered.

James Coppage stood trial and one year later was found guilty on two counts of murder. He was sentenced to two life sentences to be served concurrently.

Officer Thornton was laid to rest on September 7, 1945 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Officer Thornton was born on August 31, 1908.

The Chicago Park District Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on December 31, 1957. On January 1, 1958, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Police Department through an intergovernmental agreement. Fallen officers of the Chicago Park District Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Joseph P. Tiernan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Nov 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3014
Incident Date:
23 Aug 1917
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
24 Aug 1917
Unit of Assignment:
District 23, 29th Precinct - Sheffield
Date of Birth:
17 Feb 1879
Served:
10 years, 9 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 51
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 27-E: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph P. Tiernan, Star #3014, aged 38 years, was a 10 year, 9 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 23, 29th Precinct - Sheffield.

On August 23, 1917, at 11:43 p.m., Officer Tiernan, while walking his beat, observed suspicious activity behind a the West End Dry Goods Store located at 1775 West Madison Street. As Officer Tiernan investigated, he noticed two burglars, Harry Lindrum and Harry Sutherland, in the act of breaking into the basement of the store. As Officer Tiernan placed them under arrest, one of the offenders drew a revolver and began firing. Officer Tiernan was shot three times during the altercation. Officer Tiernan was transported to the hospital where he died the next day.

On August 27, 1917, Lindrum was held by the Coroner and also implicated Harry Sutherland in a confession. Sutherland was also arrested and held on a $20,000.00 bond issued by Judge Fisher. The September 1917 Grand Jury returned True Bills on both men. Sutherland was sent to trial and on November 3, 1917 was sentenced to 25 years in Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Lindrum was also sent to trial and was sentenced to hang on December 14, 1917 by Judge Scanlon. Governor Lowden granted a reprieve until February 15, 1918. On February 15, 1918, at 9:36 a.m., Lindrum was hanged at the Cook County Jail.

Officer Tiernan was waked at his residence located at 5585 West Monroe Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church located at 38 North Austin Boulevard, Oak Park, Illinois and he was laid to rest on August 27, 1917 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph P. Tiernan, born February 17, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 2, 1906.

Officer Tiernan was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Margaret and siblings: Bernard, John, Michael, Mrs. T. Brady and Thomas (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5318.

Patrolman Thomas Edward Tighe

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
12 Mar 1908
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2700
Incident Date:
10 Jan 1911
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
11 Mar 1911
Unit of Assignment:
District 10, 24th Precinct - West Thirteenth Street
Date of Birth:
05 Jul 1876
Served:
2 years, 11 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas Edward Tighe, Star #2700, aged 34 years, was a 2 year, 11 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 10, 24th Precinct - West Thirteenth Street.

On January 10, 1911, at 2:35 a.m., Officer Tighe responded to a complaint from a woman received at the station. She stated that three men had insulted her on the corner of Hastings and Leavitt Streets where she resides. Upon arrival, the woman was gone, but Officer Tighe observed four men, Michael Bradshaw, Mr. Carr, Edward Etchingham and Mr. Wayne, standing on the corner. Officer Tighe ordered the men to disperse. Michael Bradshaw took exception to Officer Tighe's command and spoke to him offensively. In response, Officer Tighe placed Bradshaw under arrest and was attempting to lead him to a patrol box when Bradshaw's two friends intervened. The friends protested, claiming that there were no grounds for arrest. Officer Tighe took a moment to address the men. Taking advantage of the distraction, Bradshaw was able to break away from the officer's grip. He knocked Officer Tighe to the ground and fled the scene with his friends.

Officer Tighe quickly gained his footing and gave chase. Upon seeing the policeman in pursuit, Edward Etchingham turned and fired his weapon several times, striking Officer Tighe in the abdomen. Despite being mortally wounded, Officer Tighe returned fire striking one of the offenders. The injured offender left a trail of blood running east down Hastings Street in the direction they had fled. Officer Tighe was transported to Cook County Hospital where he was able to provide details of the incident before slipping into unconsciousness. He lingered in the hospital for two months before succumbing to a Septic Infection shortly after 5:00 p.m. on March 11, 1911.

On March 13, 1911, Edward Etchingham and Michael Bradshaw were arrested and held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. Carr and Wayne were also arrested. On June 25, 1911, Bradshaw, Carr and Wayne were acquitted by Judge Kavanaugh. On July 15, 1911, Edward Etchingham was sentenced to 30 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Kavanaugh.

Officer Tighe was waked at his residence located at 825 South Campbell Avenue and he was laid to rest on March 14, 1911 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas E. Tighe, born July 5, 1876, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 12, 1908. His grave is located in Section H, Block 1, Grave 120.

Officer Tighe was survived by his wife, Margaret C. (nee Bergin) and children: Donald Edward T., Joseph, Raymond A. and Stella.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5257.

Patrolman Thomas Edward Torpy

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
08 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
525
Incident Date:
22 Sep 1934
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
22 Sep 1934
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - South Wabash
Date of Birth:
13 Oct 1896
Served:
12 years, 3 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 38
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 19-W: 15

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas Edward Torpy, Star #525, aged 37 years, was a 12 year, 3 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - South Wabash.

On September 22, 1934, at 2:45 p.m., Officer Torpy and his partner, Patrolman Robert Galbraith, went to an apartment located at 4733 South St. Lawrence Avenue. They went there to arrest Clifton Myrick, age 27, who was wanted in connection for his part within a gang that had committed over 40 robberies and two murders. Five members of the gang had already been arrested including Myrick’s brother, John. The officers arrived on scene and set up surveillance. As Myrick walked out of his apartment, Officer Torpy nearest the door, he saw the policemen had him covered with their guns and slammed it shut. Officer Torpy yanked the door open and was shot twice by Myrick. Myrick began to flee as Officer Torpy and Galbraith returned fire and started down the stairs after him. Officer Torpy was shot twice more, the last bullet hitting him in the head. As Officer Torpy Fell down the stairs, mortally wounded, Galbraith pursued the killer returning fire. Officer Galbraith was able to wound Myrick and place him under arrest. Myrick was shot five times in the gunfight. Myrick was loaded into a patrol wagon and transported to the Bridewell Hospital. While en route to the hospital, Myrick attempted to seize Patrolman John Hogan’s revolver. A struggle ensued and Myrick was shot two more times by Patrolman Clinton Towne of the 5th District. Myrick collapsed and died instantly from the additional gunshots.

Officer Torpy was waked at his residence located at 6741 South Parnell Avenue funeral mass was held at St. Bernard's Church and he was laid to rest on September 26, 1934 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas Edward Torpy, born October 13, 1896, received a Temporary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 6, 1919 prior to his Probationary Appointment to the Department on June 8, 1922. Prior to joining the Chicago Police Department he was a fireman.

Officer Torpy served in the U.S. Marine Corps in Okinawa, Japan, survived a helicopter crash and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Captain. He was survived by his wife, Mary; son, Tom and stepdaughter.

Patrolman Jose Manuel Torres

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Sep 1974
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
13988
Incident Date:
05 Aug 1979
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
37
End of Watch:
21 Aug 1979
Unit of Assignment:
10th District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
20 Sep 1942
Served:
4 years, 11 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 18
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 34
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-W: 10

Incident Details:

Patrolman Jose Manuel Torres, Star #13988, aged 37 years, was a 4 year, 11 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 10th District - Marquette.

On August 5, 1979, at 1:20 a.m., Officer Torres and his partner, Patrolman Patricia Skyles, were working the first watch on beat 1046. They assigned to investigate a traffic crash at 2516 South Blue Island Avenue in which a blue 1973 Buick Riviera was struck while parked. While inspecting the VIN number of the vehicle involved in the crash a green 1968 Ford LTD driven by Jesus Morales, age 27 of 2545 South Kedzie Avenue sideswiped the Buick and struck Officer Torres. The Ford was traveling southwest bound at approximately 60 mph and failed to stop at a stop sign before striking the officer. The impact threw Officer Torres into the air, traveling 24 feet, and through the back window of another parked car. The Ford then fled the scene. Officer Torres was transported to Mount Sinai Hospital by beat 1073 in critical condition. He sustained injuries to the head, chest and legs and was admitted to the hospital. He would later succumb to his injuries and was pronounced dead by Dr. Gonzales 16 days later at 2:30 p.m. on August 21, 1979.

Jesus Morales was arrested five hours later based on descriptions given by witnesses. His vehicle was located by beat 1020, Sergeant Ellison, at 2515 South Troy Avenue. Morales was charged with hitting a pedestrian in the roadway, driving without a city vehicle license, leaving the scene of an accident, reckless driving and driving while intoxicated. Morales was later charged with reckless homicide after Officer Torres death.

Officer Torres was waked at Lain-Hursen Funeral Home located at 5501 North Ashland Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Open Bible Spanish Church located at 3142 North Racine Avenue and he was laid to rest on August 27, 1979 in Mount Calvary Cemetery in Cagauas, Puerto Rico.

Patrolman Jose Manuel Torres, born September 20, 1942, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 16, 1974. He was also a civilian member of the Department working as a Department Property Custodian and a Senior Public Safety Aide for several years before being appointed as a Patrolman.

Officer Torres was survived by his wife, Ines (nee Manfreay).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #A877767 Traffic Crash.

Patrolman Michael J. Toth

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
27 Sep 1935
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7334
Incident Date:
08 Nov 1936
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
32
End of Watch:
08 Nov 1936
Unit of Assignment:
17th District - New City
Date of Birth:
01 May 1904
Served:
1 year, 1 month, 12 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Resurrection Catholic Cemetery - Justice, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 40
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 23-W: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman Michael J. Toth, Star #7334, aged 32 years, was a 1 year, 1 month, 12 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 17th District - New City.

On November 8, 1936, at 12:15 a.m., Officer Toth and his partner, Patrolman Thomas Bourke were working beat 182. They monitored a radio assignment for a “Disturbance” in which they responded. Walter Godula, the owner of Walter Godula's Tavern located at 4830 South Wood Street contacted police after two men attempted to sell guns in his saloon. During the call to police, Godula reported the disturbance but failed to notify the call taker that the men were armed. The officers arrived on scene and parked their squad car only a few feet north of the tavern before going inside. They entered the tavern and headed to the west end of the bar, where they had observed two men matching the description of the suspects. Officer Toth ordered one man, Frank “Doc” Whyte, age 47, to take his hand out of his pocket while Officer Bourke, with his club in hand, approached Stanley Murawski, age 37. Whyte, hearing the officers’ orders and not liking their aggressive approach, drew a gun and put it to Officer Burkes head. At the same time, he disarmed Officer Burke by removing his service revolver from its holster. As this happened, Murawski began to fight with Officer Toth, forcing him into a darkened back room. During the struggle in the back room, gunshots rang out and Officer Toth was struck. It was at this time Whyte turned the gun on Officer Bourke and Officer Toth simultaneously drew his gun and stepped in front of his partner to protect him before the shot was fired. Officer Toth managed to fire several shots, striking Whyte once before he was shot five times by Murawski. Bourke broke free and ran from the tavern to 4800 South Wood Street and called the station for back up. Bourke then ran back to the tavern only to discover his partner sitting in a chair by the front door bleeding profusely. The pair had fled the scene making good their escape. Officer Toth was rushed to German Deaconess Hospital in the 17th District patrol wagon in critical condition. It was learned that he was shot twice, once in the stomach and once in the hand. Toth succumbed to his wound at 7:00 p.m. the same day.

Further investigation into the shooting revealed different stories of the events which transpired. Godula gave a statement in which he stated that the two bandits entered the tavern at 11:30 p.m. and consumed several drinks. They then proceeded to try and sell Godula two pistols for $20.00, speaking in Slovak as they made the offer. He countered that he would pay $15.00 but they declined and continued drinking. Godula became nervous that the two men becoming more and more inebriated, he called police. This is the point where Godula’s statement deviates from the police records. In a Chicago Daily Tribune report, Godula related that he told whoever answered the phone when he called “Police 13-13” that there were “two bad men in his place with guns.” This was denied by police officials, saying the report they received was described simply as a disturbance which was also how it was broadcast over the radio. Police stated that Godula never mentioned anything about the men being armed with guns. Officer Bourke was later quoted as saying “If we had known they were armed we would gone in with guns drawn.”

Stanley Murawski and Frank Whyte, both parolees, were later apprehended and found guilty of Officer Toth's murder. On February 19, 1937, both men were convicted and sentenced to death in the electric chair. On April 16, 1937, they were executed in the electric chair. The early parole of both men led to an investigation of the parole system by then Governor Horner.

Officer Toth was waked at a chapel located at 2010 West 51st Street, his funeral mass was held at Saints Cyril and Methodius Church located at 5009 South Hermitage Avenue and he was laid to rest on November 12, 1936 in Resurrection Catholic Cemetery, 7201 Archer Avenue, Justice, Illinois.

Patrolman Michael J. Toth, born May 1, 1904, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 27, 1935.

Officer Toth was survived by his wife, Elsie (nee Nrabee) and children: Kenneth and Robert.

Patrolman George H. Trumbull

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Nov 1909
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
899
Incident Date:
17 Aug 1914
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
36
End of Watch:
17 Aug 1914
Unit of Assignment:
District 4, 4th Precinct - Cottage Grove
Date of Birth:
15 Nov 1877
Served:
4 years, 8 months, 21 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 58-E: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman George H. Trumbull, Star #899, aged 36 years, was a 4 year, 8 month, 21 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 4, 4th Precinct - Cottage Grove.

On August 17, 1914, at 1:15 a.m., Officer Trumbull was walking his beat near 26th and State Streets with two other officers, Patrolmen Lewis Hall and Lewis Schroeder. Meanwhile, at 2545 South State Street a man by the name of Simon Hogan, and ex-convict, was visiting the private home when he began an argument with the lady of the house, Emma Miller. Hogan had threatened to kill her unless she gave him $1.00. Other residents of the home then attempted to throw Hogan out. In response, he pulled a revolver and started to pistol whip two of them with it. While this was taking place, one of the women in the home ran outside to call for help and drew the attention of Officers Trumbull, Hall and Schroeder whom were walking nearby. The officers followed the woman back to the home to investigate. As they approached the residence Hogan stepped out of the building. Officer Trumbull spotted the gun in Hogan’s hand and lunged forward in an attempt to disarm Hogan. Hogan responded by opening fire and a fusillade of shots followed. When the shooting started, Officers Hall and Schroeder ducked into a nearby doorway for cover. Officer Trumbull was less fortunate as he was hit by Hogan’s shots before he could take cover and return fire. Officer Trumbull shot in four places, one of the bullets having entered his chest lodging below his heart. He collapsed to the ground and died shortly thereafter, his revolver found fully loaded beside his body.

Hogan then fled on foot, Officers Hall and Schroeder gave chase firing at Hogan as he ran. Hogan managed to evade the officers and as he ran, he encountered two other officers on patrol. They stopped and detained Hogan questioning why he was running. Hogan told them that there had been a shooting on 26th Street, pointing in the direction, and he was running to escape harm. The officer released him and ran in the direction he pointed to investigate. Moments later the Officer ran into Officer Hall and Schroeder who inquired if the officers had seen a man matching Hogan’s description running. The two officers, realizing they had let the killer go, joined in the pursuit with Officers Hall and Schroeder. They ran back to where they had last seen Hogan but were unable to locate him.

By this time over fifty officers had responded to the scene in search of Hogan. Captain Coughlin, Lieutenant Grady and several Detectives went to his brother’s house located at 8115 South Federal Street. They had only been there a few minutes when Mrs. Julia Robinson rushed inside. Mrs. Robinson said that Hogan was in her house at 3800 South State Street. The officers rushed to the address, a rooming house above a saloon, where Hogan was holed up. Upon arrival the officer went to the front door, which they found locked. They then went around to the rear where Patrolman Michael Fadden forced the door open. Hogan then opened fire, firing two rounds, one of which passed through Officer Fadden’s hand and then struck his groin. The officers returned fire and two women who had been inside ran to the windows screaming. The women were extracted from the apartment by ladder where a four-hour standoff began. Eventually, Hogan stuck his arm out from behind a drawn window shade. It was at this time a police sharpshooter fired one round from his rifle, which struck Hogan’s hand knocking the gun from it. Shortly thereafter, Hogan came downstairs and surrendered, his injured arm hanging limp and the other over his head.

Hogan was taken into custody and held by the Coroner. On November 27, 1914, Hogan was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Kersten.

Officer Trumbull was waked at his residence located at 4435 North Sidney Court (present day Pine Grove Avenue) and he was laid to rest on August 17, 1914 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman George H. Trumbull, born November 15, 1877, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 23, 1909.

Officer Trumbull was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5285.

Patrolman John Robert Tucker Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Oct 1957
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
9168
Incident Date:
08 Oct 1968
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
08 Oct 1968
Unit of Assignment:
4th District - South Chicago
Date of Birth:
06 Dec 1934
Served:
11 years, 0 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
006 - Gresham

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 17
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 17
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 6-E: 11

Incident Details:

Patrolman John Robert Tucker, Star #9168, aged 33 years, was an 11 year, 0 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th District - South Chicago Tactical Unit.

On October 4, 1968, Officer Tucker, while off duty, observed an armed robber enter the Standard Bank & Trust located at 7919 South Ashland Avenue. Officer Tucker took a position behind a pillar as the gunman, Clemmie Johnson, age 37, approached a teller's cage. Johnson went to three tellers and displayed a .38 caliber revolver demanding they place their money in a pillowcase he was carrying. Officer Tucker then began to approach the robber from behind and identified himself as a police officer when Johnson turned around and fired. Officer Tucker was struck three times in the chest and died enroute to the hospital. He was transported to Little Company of Mary Hospital in Evergreen park where he was pronounced dead on arrival.

Unbeknownst to Officer Tucker, there were already three police officers, Sergeant Neil Rourke, Patrolman Jerry Sherwood and Patrolman David Douma waiting in the lobby of the bank to catch Johnson as he left the bank. They had responded to an alarm set off by a bank guard, Francis O'Dae when Johnson began the robbery. O'Dae drew his weapon and met the responding officers in the lobby of the bank. The officers and O'Dae were waiting to confront Johnson in the lobby away from the 20 employees and 12 patrons inside the bank as to protect them. When the three officers and O'Dae heard the gunfire they rushed thru the doors immediately opening fire on Johnson. Johnson was shot three times, once in the head, and fell to the floor. Sergeant Rourke fired three shots, Sherwood two shots, Douma six shots and O'Dae five shots. Johnson was arrested and taken to Little Company of Mary Hospital in Evergreen Park where he underwent surgery, $13,181.74 were recovered from Johnson's pillowcase.

Sergeant Rourke rushed to Tucker's side. Rourke later said that Tucker was clutching his wounds and said "I tried to get him." Tucker then collapsed and died while enroute to Little Company of Mary Hospital in Evergreen Park.

On March 24, 1969, Clemmie Johnson was convicted in a four day bench trial and was sentenced to serve 100 to 190 years in prison by Judge Richard J. Fitzgerald. Johnson was later paroled and released from prison on December 12, 2006 after serving only 37 years.

Officer Collin's funeral mass was held at St. John the Baptist Church located at 911 West 50th Place and he was laid to rest on October 12, 1968 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman John Robert Tucker, born December 6, 1934, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 1, 1957. He earned 1 Award of Valor (Posthumously), 1 Blue Star Award (Posthumously), 1 Department Commendation and 4 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Tucker was a member of the Illinois Police Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Regina, age 34; children: James, age 12, Janice, age 11 and John, Jr., age 4; mother, Rosa and siblings: Bernadine, Dolores, Donna, Dorothy, Eileen, Gladys, Joanne and Norma.