LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

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Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

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1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman Edward J. Wallner

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Aug 1891
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1533
Incident Date:
05 Jan 1899
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
05 Jan 1899
Unit of Assignment:
District 9, 23rd Precinct - Hinman
Date of Birth:
1870
Served:
7 years, 4 months, 23 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Boniface Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 29
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 25-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edward J. Wallner, Star #1533, aged 28 years, was a 7 year, 4 month, 23 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 9, 23rd Precinct - Hinman.

On January 5, 1899, at 6:00 p.m., Six highway men, Charles Peterson, alias Frank Ford, Fred Jones, alias Sam Ritch, Edward Lally, alias Edward Murphy, Thomas McFadden, alias Mickey, Frank Senoni and Albert Stiles entered Borrmann's dry goods store located at No. 832 West 21st Street (present day 2001 West 21st Street). The owner, Mr. Borrmann and his employee, Charles G. Carlson were alone in the store. Mr. Borrmann was in his office at the front of the store, while Carlson was standing near the stove at the back of the store. Upon entering the store, one of the six bandits stationed themselves near the front door. The other five went to the rear of the store. As Carlson turned to greet the men, he discovered two pistols starring him in the face. One bandit said, “Now be good, where is the man in the other room?” The bandit was referring to a third employee who was a cutter. Carlson told him he wasn’t at work, at which time the bandit went to verify his claim. After, the bandits took a gold watch, valued at $60.00, a $5.00 bill and a silver dollar from Carlson. At the same time, Mr. Borrmann was under guard with a pistol pressed to the back of his head by one of the other bandits. The bandits then moved on to the cash drawer where they took $35.00 in silver and bills. Realizing there was nothing else they could steal, the robbers then proceeded to leave as a German woman was walking in to make a purchase. Paying no attention to her, the bandits walked out.

As the bandits walked down the street, an errand boy employed by the store, Herman Kirchoff, age 17, arrived at the corner. He observed the robbers walking and overheard them say, “How much did you get? Go on across the street. Don’t all get in a bunch.” Kirchoff realized the situation and ran across the street into Engel’s Saloon where he alerted Officer Wallner and his partner, Patrolman John McCauley who were working in plainclothes. It was now 6:15 p.m., the officers drew their weapons and ran down Robey Street (present day Damen Avenue) to 21st Place. Upon arrival they observed four the bandits on 21st Street near Lincoln Street (present day Wolcott Street), a block east of Robey Street. The bandits were at the mouth of an alley just south of 21st Street when the officers shouted for them to hold up their hands. The officers continued to advance on the robbers and one of the bandits made a faint as if to draw their revolvers. It was at this time Officer McCauley fired a round into the air. By this time the officers were less than ten feet from the bandits when a gunfight broke out.

Officers McCauley and Wallner both returned fire, shooting four times each. The bandits fired ten times. Officer McCauley shot in the right wrist and his side and Officer Wallner was mortally wounded in the chest. Five of the bandits then fled on foot in the dark alley and the sixth ran southbound on Lincoln Street and was then seen jumping over a railing dropping ten feet to the ground below. Officer Wallner then walked unaided into the saloon of Edward Anderson located at 22nd Street and Lincoln Street over 150 feet away from where he was shot. He sat down on a table with his back to the wall and asked Mr. Anderson to send for a doctor. Officer McCauley gave chase to the lone bandit southbound on Lincoln. He eventually lost sight of him in a vacant lot. He then went to a Patrol Box and summoned help from the Hinman Street Station. Unbeknownst to Officer McCauley help had already been summoned from the Patrol Box at 21st and Robey Streets reporting the robbery. A patrol wagon was dispatched accompanied by Lieutenant Ptacek. While enroute the wagon observed one of the bandits running down the street, but had no idea that the shooting had occurred and no attempt was made to stop the man. The wagon arrived at Borrmann’s and was informed of the direction in which the robbers had fled. They hastened down 21st Street where they met Officer McCauley who informed them of the shooting. The wagon then rushed to Anderson’s saloon where the located Officer Wallner who was rapidly growing weak from his wound. They rushed him to Cook County Hospital where he died from his wounds at 8:56 p.m. the same day. Officer McCauley was also taken to Cook County Hospital where he was treated and released.

On January 19, 1899, Charles Peterson, Fred Jones, Thomas McFadden, Edward Lally, and Albert Stiles were arrested and held by the Coroner's Jury. Frank Senoni was also later arrested and held as an accessory. On June 24, 1899, Edward Lally, Frederick Jones, Michael McFadden and Charles Peterson were all sentenced to the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Stein. One was sentenced to life, two were sentenced to 25 years, and one was sentenced to 14 years. A 5th suspect was acquitted.

Officer Wallner was laid to rest in St. Boniface Cemetery, 4901 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Edward J. Wallner, born in 1870, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 13, 1891.

Officer Wallner was survived by his wife and brother, John (CPD). His brother was a Desk Sergeant at the Desplaines Street Station and his father, Simon Wallner, was the former Alderman of the 10th Ward.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2619.

Patrolman Charles B. Walsh

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2811
Incident Date:
13 Jun 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
13 Jun 1925
Unit of Assignment:
District 2 - Cottage Grove
Date of Birth:
30 Jan 1895
Served:
2 years, 7 months, 18 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
008 - Chicago Lawn

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. John’s Catholic Cemetery - Wilton, Wisconsin
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 19
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 39-E: 1

Incident Details:

Patrolman Charles B. Walsh, Star #2811, aged 30 years, was a 2 year, 7 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2 - Cottage Grove, detailed to Detective Division - Ford Squad 8-C.

On June 13, 1925, at 9:30 a.m., Officer Walsh was on patrol with Sergeant Conway, Patrolmen Harold F. Olson and William Sweeney. They had been on the lookout for a Cadillac driving around with mobsters, Samoots Amatuna, Alhert Anselmi, Michael Genna and John Scalice, broadcast in an All Points Bulletin. The men were wanted as they had just attempted to assassinate one of their rivals in their role as hit men for Al Capone. While on patrol, they spotted the Cadillac at 47th Street and Western Avenue. The mobsters also spotted them and fled at a high rate of speed. A pursuit was initiated and just as soon as the chase began, the driver of the Cadillac took a corner too fast and lost control. The Cadillac crashed into a light pole in front of 5940 South Western Avenue. The officers right on their tale leapt from their squad car and ran towards the crashed auto. As the four gangsters exited the car, they opened fire on the officers as they attempted to escape. A gun battle ensued and Officers Olson and Walsh were hit almost immediately collapsing to the pavement mortally wounded. Sergeant Conway was also hit, going down as well. Officer Sweeney was the only one left to battle the gangsters. Backup eventually came after Patrolmen George Oakley and Albert Rickey were passing by on a streetcar and observed the shootout happening. They joined the fight by hailing a taxicab and instructed the driver to take the injured officers to St. Bernard Hospital. They then returned to join the fight as Officer Sweeney was now in a foot pursuit with the gangsters.

As Officer Sweeney chased Genna, Genna attempted to fire but his gun malfunctioned. Genna continued to run towards 59th Street and Artesian Avenue when Officer Sweeney fired and hit him causing him to stumble and fall down. Although gravely wounded, Genna was able to crawl and climbed through a basement window in the rear of 5941 South Artesian Avenue. Officer Sweeney continued the chase following Anselmi and Scalice while Officer Rickey followed Genna into the basement. Rickert entered the basement and found Genna lying in a pool of blood with a femoral arterial bleed coming from his thigh. Officer Rickert summoned an ambulance and Genna was transported to a hospital, dying enroute.

At this point news of the shooting had reached districts across the city. Units responded to the scene from all over the city. One of the cars that responded heard the gunshots of the running gun battle and observed Officer Sweeney pursuing Anselmi and Scalice just as they jumped onto a Westbound streetcar. Sergeant Stapleton ordered the driver of the squad car to pull alongside the streetcar and the Sergeant jumped on board apprehending the two gangsters. That left one gangster unaccounted for, Amatuna, had fled the scene just after the Cadillac crashed before the gunfire erupted.

On June 15, 1925, Anselmi and Scalice were turned over to the Cook County Sheriff after being indicted. Anselmi and Scalice stood trial and were found guilty for the murder of Officer Olsen and were acquitted for the murder of Officer Walsh. On December 5, 1925, both men were sentenced to 14 years each in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Brothers.

Anselmi and Scalice were granted a second trial on appeal. Their attorney argued justifiable homicide as their defense. He claimed that the men were simply defending themselves against “unwarranted police aggression.” Their attorney asserted that it was no crime to kill a cop if one is detained against his will or a weapon is drawn against him, situations in which he maintained the men should not be answerable to the law. On December 3, 1926 both sentences were reversed and remanded by Supreme Court Justice Lindsay. On June 23, 1927, during a new trial they were acquitted by Judge Lindsay. Anselmi and Scalice were later murdered by Al Capone in May 1929. They were found dead on the side of a road in Indiana beaten to death. The two men were hit men for Al Capone when they murdered Patrolmen Olsen and Walsh.

Officer Walsh was laid to rest in St. John’s Catholic Cemetery, 510 Walker Street, Wilton, Wisconsin.

Patrolman Charles B. Walsh, born January 30, 1895, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 26, 1922.

Officer Walsh served in the U.S. Navy and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #9247.

In December of 1923 the Ford Squad was assigned to the Detective Division and detailed to patrol two districts. The cars were manned by four men in plainclothes with two shotguns. They patrolled 24 hours a day in eight hour shifts.

Park Policeman Raymond Earl Walsh

Image Not Available
Agency:
North Shore Park District Police Department
Appointed Date:
Oct 1923
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
433
Incident Date:
08 Mar 1925
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
28
End of Watch:
08 Mar 1925
Unit of Assignment:
Rogers Park District
Date of Birth:
31 Oct 1896
Served:
1 year, 7 months*
District of Incident (Present Day):
024 - Rogers Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 18
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 15-W: 25

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Raymond Earl Walsh, Star #433, aged 28 years, was a 1 year, 7 month veteran of the North Shore Park District Police Department, assigned to the Rogers Park District.

On March 8, 1925, Officer Walsh was riding his police motorcycle in pursuit of a speeding vehicle when he was struck by a taxi on North Sheridan Road. Officer Walsh was fatally injured. The vehicle he was attempting to stop was never identified and the driver was never apprehended.

Officer Walsh was waked at his residence located at 6019 North Newgard Avenue, his funeral mass was held in Requiem at St. Ignatius Church located at 6559 North Glenwood Avenue and he was laid to rest on March 11, 1925 in All Saints Catholic Cemetery and Mausoleum, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois. His grave is located in Gr. 1, Lot S 1/2 8, Block 7, Section 12.

Park Policeman Raymond Earl Walsh, born in October 31, 1896, received his Probationary Appointment to the North Shore Park District Police Department in October, 1923.

Officer Walsh served in the U.S. Army from April 1, 1917 thru June 8, 1919, was a veteran of World War I and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Private. He served in France on the Meuse-Argonne and St. Mihiel’s fronts, was cited for bravery and awarded the Bronze Cross twice. Officer Walsh was survived by his wife, Marie C.; parents: Delia (nee Toomey) and James A. and siblings: James A. “Pal”, age 28 and Loretto. He was the first holder of the Tribune Federal Life accident life insurance plan to be killed. He applied for the policy and sent in a coupon with $1.00 only one week before his death. His mother received a $2,000.00 death benefit payment following his death.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The North Shore Park District, one of 22 independent park districts was consolidated into the Chicago Park District in 1934. Unlike most of these park boards, the North Shore District, formed in 1900, was at first interested only in enhancing the area through boulevard improvements along Sheridan Road, Pratt Boulevard, and Ashland Avenue. By 1905, however, public pressure had prompted the district to consider park development. The district spent several years mulling its options. Finally, in 1909, at the urging of the Rogers Park Woman's Club, the North Shore District determined to concentrate its resources on purchasing land for a single beachfront park and boating basin known as North Shore Park. Shortly thereafter, noted landscape architect and engineer O.C. Simonds developed plans for a pier at the site, but these were never realized. By 1917, the North Shore District had acquired more than nine acres of lakeshore property. A small field house, built in 1923, soon provided game and club rooms. Playfields were flooded for ice skating in winter; in 1929, the local American Legion post erected a shelter house for skaters. Several years after the Chicago Park District took over in 1934, local residents asked that North Shore Park be renamed. The park district agreed, and held a contest to choose a new name. Neighborhood residents favored the name Loyola Park, for nearby Loyola University. The Jesuits began to develop this important Rogers Park institution in 1906, when they purchased a 20-acre site between Devon and Loyola Avenues. During the 1930s, the university raised its neighborhood profile substantially by constructing a number of dramatic Art Deco buildings, including the Madonna della Strada Chapel. Around 1950, the Chicago Park District more than doubled the size of Loyola Park and built a new field house with an adjacent grandstand. Another half-acre was added in 1971, bringing the size of Loyola Park to more than 21.5 acres.

Patrolman Robert F. Wenzel

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Jan 1961
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7495
Incident Date:
19 Jan 1973
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
36
End of Watch:
19 Jan 1973
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Traffic Division: Unit 086 - Traffic Area 6 Group
Date of Birth:
17 Nov 1936
Served:
12 years, 0 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Acacia Park Cemetery - Norridge, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 6-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Robert F. Wenzel, Star #7495, aged 36 years, was a 12 year, 0 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Traffic Division: Unit 086 - Traffic Area 6 Group.

On January 19, 1973, at 5:23 a.m., Officer Wenzel was working the first watch on beat 9652. While on patrol he was conducting a traffic stop at 1903 North Lake Shore Drive. At some point during the traffic stop, the motorist, Richard Luckey, age 44, drew a revolver and fired two shots. Officer Wenzel, though wounded, was able to return fire, shooting six times and striking Luckey multiple times. Officer Wenzel was struck four times, twice in the chin, once in the neck and once in the back. He was transported to Augustina Hospital by beat 1972 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Fetter at 5:40 a.m. on January 19, 1973. Luckey was found by responding officers near the scene, not far from Officer Wenzel’s squad car. He was transported to Wesley memorial Hospital by CFD Ambulance #11 and was placed in secure custody. It was also believed that there was a second offender by the name of Joseph Lee Bolden or Bolton who fled in the car after the shooting.

Richard Luckey was charged with murder. During questioning he told police that he and Bolden were looking for a place to rob after leaving a tavern when they ran into Officer Wenzel. Luckey stood trial and was found guilty of Officer Wenzel's murder. He was sentenced to 75 to 150 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. On June 26, 2011, Richard Luckey died in the Stateville Correctional Facility prison. Bolden remains at large and was never found.

Officer Wenzel was waked at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home located at 6150 North Cicero Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on January 22, 1973 in Acacia Park Cemetery, 7800 West Irving Park Road, Norridge, Illinois.

Patrolman Robert F. Wenzel, born November 17, 1936, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 16, 1961. He earned 1 Honorable Mention and 11 Letters of Commendation during his career.

Officer Wenzel served in the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve from 1953 thru 1962 and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Bomerwald Lodge, Confederation of Police, Fraternal Order of Police, Illinois Police Association and the St. Jude Police League. Officer Wenzel was survived by his wife, Rose (nee LaCavera); children: Colleen, age 14, Daniel Peloza, Michael, age 16 and Robert Peloza; father, John and brother, John.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #N023503.

Patrolman LaVaughn Vasser White Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
1953
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7473
Incident Date:
05 Jun 1961
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
05 Jun 1961
Unit of Assignment:
15th District - Racine
Date of Birth:
05 Apr 1926
Served:
8 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
006 - Gresham

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 8
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 19-W: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman LaVaughn Vasser White, Sr., Star #7473, aged 35 years, was an 8 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 15th District - Racine.

On June 5, 1961, at 1:30 a.m., Officer White, while off duty, was a patron at the Poinciana Inn Tavern located at 121 East 79th Street. Four men, Donald Curry, age 24, Thomas Jackson, age 19, Harold McEwen, age 20 and Joseph Prewitt, age 24, walked in, placed an order at the bar and began drinking. Curry sat next to Officer White and overheard a conversation White was having with a friend. White was talking about being transferred and from that Curry deduced that White was a policeman and informed the other three bandits. Curry then left the bar and went to his car and got two pistols and returned. At 1:45 a.m., Officer White left the tavern and went to his apartment located above the tavern to walk his dog. After Officer White left, Curry jumped over the bar and covered the bartender while his partners covered the other patrons, some of whom were hoarded into a backroom. While walking his dog, Officer White was approached by a waitress, Juanita Trowell, age 22, who worked in the tavern. She signaled to him indicating a holdup was in progress. Officer White entered the tavern, drew his revolver, and announced his office. His announcement was met with gunfire. Officer White dropped to one knee and returned fire, emptying his revolver. Officer White was shot through the head as he attempted to reload and died instantly. He was able to hit one of the gunmen, striking him in the chest, before collapsing. Miss Trowell also sustained a gunshot graze wound to the head during the gun battle. She was transported to St. George Hospital where she was reported in fair condition. The gunmen all fled the scene.

Investigating officers recovered a wallet at the scene that was dropped during the hold up. The owner of the wallet, Joseph Prewitt, was identified by a photo ID as one of the gunmen. After fleeing the tavern, one of the gunmen, Harold McEwen, was arrested 40 minutes after the shooting when he went to the University of Illinois Hospital with a gunshot wound to the chest. Hospital staff alerted police, who responded and arrested him. McEwen told police that he was shot during a stickup at Madison Street and Oakley Avenue, but McEwen's mother told officers that her son was acquainted with the owner of the wallet that was found. Police brought a witness to the hospital to identify McEwen and when he was identified he refused to make any further statements. on June 6, 1961, Thomas Jackson was arrested after giving himself up in a subway station at Madison and State Streets.

Joseph Prewitt, was arrested at his work where police laid in wait for him to arrive. He was arrested by Sergeants James L. Bryson and Earl Fornier. Recovered from his home was a pair of trousers and shoes with blood stains on them. Sergeant Bryson also said that they searched Prewitt's 1955 Chevrolet and found two .38 caliber revolvers hidden under the hood between the radiator and the grill. During questioning, Prewitt admitted that he had been in the tavern but declared he did not fire the fatal shot and didn't know who did. Prewitt then implicated two other men, Thomas Jackson and Donald Curry. On June 7, 1951, at 8:00 a.m., Donald Curry was arrested in Gary, Indiana by Detectives Clarence Burke, Luceke Mays, Robert Hughes and Joe Beirne after he attempted to buy a bus ticket to Philadelphia at the Greyhound bus terminal. Curry waived extradition and was returned immediately to Chicago. Curry's location was learned of after Chicago Policemen found a car in which he was riding with companions. The officers were told that Curry was in Gary, Indiana. Police then search Curry's in-laws home and found three revolvers in a cardboard box on a closet shelf, one of which was Officer White's.

All four offenders were charged with the murder of Officer White. On June 22, 1961, they were indicted for murder by the Grand Jury. On November 30, 1961, the defendants waived a jury trial and during a bench trial, all four defendants pleaded guilty to the charge of murder. The four were sentenced to 99 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Alexander Napoli.

Officer LaVaughn was waked at McDonald Funeral Home located at 8138 South Cottage Grove Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 8, 1961 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman LaVaughn Vasser White, Sr., born April 5, 1926, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in 1953. He earned 2 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer LaVaughn served in the U.S. Army Reserve and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Private First Class. He was survived by his wife, Annette B. and children: Bonnie, age 17, Chico, age 11 and LaVaughn Vasser, Jr., age 13.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #144977.

In July, 1961, Officer LaVaughn's star was retired by Superintendent Orlando W. Wilson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer LaVaughn's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Park Policeman Charles “Buck” H. Williams II

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Park District Police Department
Appointed Date:
1923
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
210
Incident Date:
10 Dec 1941
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
51
End of Watch:
10 Dec 1941
Unit of Assignment:
North Section
Date of Birth:
19 Jun 1890
Served:
19 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Lucas Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 19
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 42
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-W: 3

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Charles “Buck” H. Williams, II, Star #210, aged 51 years, was a 18 year veteran of the Chicago Park District Police Department, assigned to the North Section.

On December 10, 1941, Officer Williams while off duty, but still in uniform stopped to relax in a lounge at 4301 North Western Avenue on his way home from work. Two offenders, intent on robbery, entered the establishment and announced a robbery, while a third man waited outside in a stolen car. The two offenders didn't see Officer Williams until after they announced the robbery. As soon as one of the robbers saw Officer Williams he opened fire shooting six times, while the other offender held the front door open to aide in their escape. Officer Williams was struck three times in the stomach. He drew his service revolver and returned fire before collapsing near the bar. The robbers fled in the waiting car without obtaining any proceeds making good their escape. Officer Williams was transported to Martha Washington Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds.

The shooter had left his hat behind as he fled. The hat was traced to the store where it was purchased and investigators were able to identify its owner from the store's clerk. Using the name, investigators utilized the local draft boards records to locate an address on the shooter. Police went to the address and were able to locate John Pantano and place him in custody. Pantano claimed that he didn't shoot the officer and could not provide the full names of his accomplices because he only knew them as Tom and Eddie. Investigators worked the lead which led to the arrest of Charles Theos and Joseph Moreale.

John Pantano was tried, found guilty and sentenced to death. In September 1942, he was electrocuted. Charles Theos and Joseph Moreale were also tried and found guilty. They were both sentenced to separate prison terms.

Officer Williams was waked at a chapel located at 3005-07 North Lincoln Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest on December 13, 1941 in St. Lucas Cemetery, 5300 North Pulaski Road, Chicago, Illinois.

Park Policeman Harry “Buck” H. Williams, II, born on June 19, 1890, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Park District Police Department in 1923.

Officer Williams served in the U.S. Army in the Field Artillery Corps, was a veteran of World War I and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Lincoln Park Police Social & Benevolent Association. Officer Williams was survived by his wife, Nellie (nee Gustafson); parents: Frank and Minnie and sister, Ella Jaster.

The Chicago Park District Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on December 31, 1957. On January 1, 1958, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Police Department through an intergovernmental agreement. Fallen officers of the Chicago Park District Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman James A. Williams

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Mar 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
942
Incident Date:
14 Jul 1924
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
45
End of Watch:
16 Jul 1924
Unit of Assignment:
District 2 - Cottage Grove
Date of Birth:
05 Oct 1878
Served:
17 years, 4 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Westlawn Cemetery - Kansas City, Kansas
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 10
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 45-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman James A. Williams, Star #942, aged 45 years, was a 17 year, 4 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2 - Cottage Grove.

On July 14, 1924, at 9:35 p.m., Officer Williams was on patrol when he observed four armed gunmen, Walter Harris, Charles Holis, Clarence Mitchell and Nathan Pauletto, robbing the home of Mrs. Flora Davis located at 2819 South Wabash Avenue. As Officer Williams arrived on scene Nathan Pauletto opened fire striking the officer six times, four in the back and two in his side. The robbers then began to flee the scene on foot. Officer Williams returned fire, as he fell to the ground, and wounded Nathan Pauletto striking him in the abdomen. Pauletto’s accomplices deserted him and continued to flee the scene. Officer Williams was rushed to Michael Reese Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds two days later on July 16, 1924. Pauletto was arrested and taken to the Bridewell Hospital where he was treated and recovered.

Sergeants Patrick Lee and Frank McNamara tracked down the other three bandits. They arrested Walter Harris of Bunker Street (present day Grenshaw Street), as a suspect. During questioning Harris admitted to the robbery but denied shooting. He gave the names of his accomplices, Holis, Mitchell and Pauletto. Charles Holis and Clarence Mitchell were later arrested and stood trial with Pauletto and Harris. On November 12, 1924, all four suspects were found guilty and sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Wells.

Officer Williams was laid to rest in Westlawn Cemetery, 628 South 38th Street, Kansas City, Kansas.

Patrolman James A. Williams, born October 5, 1878, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 7, 1907. He earned 2 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer Williams was survived by his wife, Veda.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7470.

Patrolman Cornelius Wilson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 Feb 1915
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2902
Incident Date:
01 May 1919
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
01 May 1919
Unit of Assignment:
District 3, 3rd Precinct - Cottage Grove
Date of Birth:
24 Jun 1889
Served:
4 years, 2 months, 26 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Carrollton IOOF Cemetery - Carrollton, Kentucky
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 56
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 36-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman Cornelius Wilson, Star #2902, aged 29 years, was a 4 year, 2 month, 26 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 3, 3rd Precinct - Cottage Grove.

On May 1, 1919, at 2:00 a.m., Officer Wilson was in plain clothes walking home after his tour of duty. At 37th and State Streets he observed three men, Herman Dykes and Dan Harlan, suspected of committing a series of armed robberies. Officer Wilson approached them and asked a few questions. Without warning, the men produced handguns and began firing. Officer Wilson was able to return fire and fatally wound one of the assailants. A passing motorist came upon the scene and loaded Officer Wilson into their auto and rushed him to Provident Hospital. Their efforts were in vain as Officer Wilson succumbed to his injuries while en route to the hospital. At the same time another citizen notified the Cottage Grove Avenue Station of what had taken place and officers responded to the scene. An ambulance was summoned but was too late to help Officer Wilson. By the time it arrived he had already been taken to the hospital. Upon arrival officers searched the area and found one of the assailant’s dead body about a half a block away. On his person were found a mask and gun. The man also had a stocking cap which led investigators to believe he was a former soldier.

Two weeks after the incident, the Hooded Bandit Gang, a group of hoodlums who in the past six months had been robbing banks, coal yards, payrolls and pedestrians, confessed to the murder of Officer Wilson. Herman Dykes and Dan Harlan were arrested. While in custody, Harlan confessed to his part in the crime while being treated for a gunshot wound at Cook County hospital. He sustained the gunshot after Wilson’s murder. On May 14, 1919, they were charged with murder and held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. On August 25, 1919, both men were found guilty and sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Guerin.

Officer Wilson was laid to rest on May 5, 1919 in the Odd Fellows Cemetery, later renamed Carrollton IOOF Cemetery, 12 Seminary Street, Carrollton, Kentucky.

Patrolman Cornelius Wilson, born June 24, 1889, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 5, 1915. He earned 4 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer Wilson was survived by his wife and parents: Matthew and Virginia (nee Miller).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5551.

Patrolman Dennis Wilson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 May 1919
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3511
Incident Date:
09 Apr 1920
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
09 Apr 1920
Unit of Assignment:
District 3, 3rd Precinct - Cottage Grove
Date of Birth:
16 Jan 1890
Served:
10 months, 17 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 19
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 58
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-W: 11

Incident Details:

Patrolman Dennis Wilson, Star #3511, aged 30 years, was a 10 months, 17 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 3, 3rd Precinct - Cottage Grove.

On April 9, 1920, at 2:30 p.m., Officer Wilson was on duty working in plain clothes when he heard gunfire. The officer rushed in the direction of the gunfire and came across three men who had been fighting, one of which was brandishing a revolver. Knowing that one shot had already been fired, he attempted to disarm the gunman, William Hargraves. Hargraves was a barber who worked in the shop located at 2946 South State Street, which is where the confrontation took place. Officer Wilson ordered Hargraves to drop the gun, but he refused to comply. Instead, Hargraves responded by opening fire. Officer Wilson was hit but was able to return fire, striking Hargraves, before succumbing to his wounds. Hargraves died from his injuries the next day on April 11, 1920.

Officer Wilson was laid to rest on April 12, 1920 in Lincoln Cemetery, 2300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Dennis Wilson, born January 16, 1890, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 23, 1919. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Wilson was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5578.

Patrolman Gilbert P. Wilson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
11 Feb 1929
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1624
Incident Date:
02 Oct 1930
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
30
End of Watch:
02 Oct 1930
Unit of Assignment:
Traffic Division
Date of Birth:
05 Mar 1900
Served:
1 year, 7 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Montrose Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman Gilbert P. Wilson, Star #1624, aged 30 years, was a 1 year, 8 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Traffic Division.

On October 2, 1930, at 1:55 p.m., Officer Wilson had just begun his tour of duty and was riding his police horse on the lower level of Wacker Drive at LaSalle Street. Suddenly his mount reared after becoming startled from the sound of a passing city garbage truck and trailer. Officer Wilson was thrown from the horse and fell under a passing truck carrying three trailers. The officer was unable to move out of the way and was run over by the truck. Officer Wilson died at the scene.

On October 3, 1930, the driver of the truck was exonerated by the Coroner.

Officer Wilson was laid to rest on October 6, 1930 in Montrose Cemetery, 5400 North Pulaski Road, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Gilbert P. Wilson, born March 5, 1900, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 11, 1929.

Officer Wilson was survived by his wife, Hellen.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Sergeant Kazimer J. Wistert

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
247
Incident Date:
10 Jul 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
50
End of Watch:
07 Jun 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 32 - North Robey
Date of Birth:
11 Dec 1876
Served:
21 years, 2 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 14-W: 14

Incident Details:

Sergeant Kazimer J. Wistert, Star #247, aged 50 years, was a 21 year, 2 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 32 - North Robey.

On July 10, 1926, at 3:25 a.m., Sergeant Wistert was approached by a citizen who identified a man on the street who was in the process of committing a robbery. Sergeant Wistert raced to the scene where he frustrated the robbery causing the offender to flee on foot. Wistert followed the suspect into a building located at 2204-06 West Wilson Avenue. After entering the building, Sergeant Wistert had discovered the offender had climbed a flight of stairs and was on the landing. The armed offender suddenly turned around and fired a revolver, striking Sergeant Wistert in the chest before fleeing. Sergeant Wistert was rushed to Ravenswood Hospital where he lingered for almost a year before succumbing to his injuries on June 7, 1927.

On July 8, 1927, the arrest of the unknown assailant was recommended by the Coroner. The offender is still at large.

Sergeant Wistert was laid to rest in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Sergeant Kazimer J. Wistert, born December 11, 1876, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 2, 1906. On January 10, 1920, he was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Wistert was survived by his wife and four children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #9324.

Park Policeman Arthur Robert Wittbrodt Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
20 Jan 1931
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
271
Incident Date:
16 Jan 1932
Cause of Death:
Age:
35
End of Watch:
17 Jan 1932
Unit of Assignment:
Unit of Assignment Unknown
Date of Birth:
07 Jun 1896
Served:
11 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 32
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 34-E: 2

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Arthur Robert Wittbrodt, Sr., Star #271, aged 35 years, was an 11 month, 28 day veteran of the South Park Police Department, unit of assignment unknown.

On January 16, 1932. Officer Wittbrodt, while on foot patrol, learned of a serious automobile crash. At 53rd Street and Michigan Avenue, Officer Wittbrodt commandeered a passing vehicle and ordered the driver to take him to the scene of the crash. Officer Wittbrodt jumped on the running board of the vehicle and as the citizen responded to the scene he braked suddenly to avoid striking another car. Officer Wittbrodt was thrown from the vehicle and sustained fatal injuries in the fall. He was taken to Chicago Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries the next day on January 17, 1932.

Officer Wittbrodt was waked at his residence, 5304 South Wolcott Avenue and he was laid to rest on January 20, 1932 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Park Policeman Arthur Robert Wittbrodt, Sr., born June 7, 1896, received his Probationary Appointment to the South Park Police Department on January 20, 1931.

Officer Wittbrodt was survived by his common law wife; Pearl and children: Arthur Robert, Jr. and Rita.

The South Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park District police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the South Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Thomas A. Wodarczyk

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Mar 1973
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
10530
Incident Date:
08 Apr 1974
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile (Pursuit)
Age:
33
End of Watch:
08 Apr 1974
Unit of Assignment:
1st District - Central
Date of Birth:
11 Nov 1940
Served:
1 year, 0 months, 20 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Michael Cemetery - Wheaton, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 28
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 32-E: 4

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas A. Wodarczyk, Star #10530, aged 33 years, was a 1 year, 0 month, 20 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st District - Central.

On April 8, 1974, at 5:55 a.m., Patrolmen William S. Bodnar and Thomas A. Wodarczyk were working the first watch on beat 107. While on patrol they initiated a vehicle pursuit of a stolen white 1964 Oldsmobile traveling westbound on Van Buren Street from State Street. For 3 minutes and 20 seconds, beat 107 was reporting on the progress of the pursuit and relaying the license number of the car being pursued. Officer Bodnar was driving as Officer Wodarczyk updated the dispatch center. Suddenly the radio traffic from beat 107 went silent and they were not responding. At 5:43 a.m., another officer called in for emergency equipment to be sent to Van Buren and Morgan Streets. The stolen vehicle had sideswiped a produce truck, driven by Frank Scimica of 1462 West Erie Street, causing it to crash into the beat car and fall on top of it, pinning the officers inside. As a result both officers sustained serious injuries. Officers Bodnar and Wodarczyk were both transported to Illinois Research Hospital where they were pronounced dead on arrival by at 6:09 a.m. on April 8, 1974.

The truck driver, Frank Scimica, was northbound on Morgan Street, proceeding through the green light. His view of the oncoming squad car was partially blocked by an eight-story building on the southeast corner of the intersection. The stolen vehicle was later found abandoned a short distance from the crash and the driver was never apprehended.

Officer Wodarczyk was waked at Pomierski Funeral Home located at 1059 West 32nd Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church located at 8237 South Shore Drive and he was laid to rest on April 12, 1974 in St. Michael Cemetery, 1109 Warrenville Road, Wheaton, Illinois. He earned 1 Police Blue Star Award (posthumously) during his career.

Patrolman Thomas A. Wodarczyk, born November 11, 1940, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 19, 1973.

Officer Wodarczyk served in the U.S. Army stationed at Fort Bliss, Texas from October 6, 1958 to February 2, 1961, was a veteran of the Korean War and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Specialist 4th Class. He was also a member of the Chicago Patrolman's Association, Illinois Police Association and St. Jude Police League. Officer Wodarczyk was survived by his wife, Patricia A. (nee Thorn); children: Mark Allen, age 7, Anita Marie, age 6 and David, age 4; and siblings: Sandra, James, Nancy and Sigmund.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #P802615.

On June 27, 2007, Officer Wodarczyk's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Park Policeman Martin J. Wolski

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Park District Police Department
Appointed Date:
1925
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
559
Incident Date:
26 Mar 1938
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
26 Mar 1938
Unit of Assignment:
South Section
Date of Birth:
11 Nov 1900
Served:
13 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Resurrection Catholic Cemetery - Justice, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 20
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 41
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 9-W: 10

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Martin Joseph Wolski, Star #559, aged 37 years, was a 13 year veteran of the Chicago Park District Police Department, assigned to the South Section.

On March 26, 1938, Officer Wolski, while on patrol, in uniform were making rounds of McKinley Park in an auto driven by his brother-in-law, Louis Czapski. As the two approached what was known as 'Lover's Lane' at 3500 South Damen Avenue Officer Wolski noticed something out of place. They observed an old model sedan with both its front doors open and two suspicious men standing next to it. Czapski continued driving and moved the car to a short bend in the road approximately 100 feet from the men in order to conceal their presence from the two men. Officer Wolski told Czapski that he did not like the look of the situation and told him to stay in the car as he went to investigate on foot.

Wolski approached the car with only his flashlight in hand. It is not known what transpired after this, but it was only a short time later that Czapski heard six shots being fired and immediately ran from the car to investigate. Arriving on scene, Czapski observed Officer Wolski lying in the road mortally injured. Wolski's hat was on the ground nearby and his gun, fired twice, was at his side. The offenders made good their escape on foot northbound through the park. Officer Wolski was shot in the head, shoulder and hand. He was taken to Evangelical Hospital unconscious and would never awake succumbing to his wounds.

It was believed that the offenders were in their late teens and had been robbing couples in the park. In April 1938, four members of a gang, Victor Labuckas, Felix Loraitis, Bruno Murzydlo and Bruno Panavas were arrested and tried for robberies committed in parks. They were all found guilty and each were sentenced to 1 year in prison. The killers of Officer Wolski were never identified.

Officer Wolski was waked at a chapel located at 3756 South Paulina Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Joseph and St. Ann Church located at 2751 West 38th Place and he was laid to rest on March 30, 1938 in Resurrection Catholic Cemetery, 7201 Archer Avenue, Justice, Illinois. His grave is located in Lot So 1/2-156, Section 23.

Park Policeman Martin Joseph Wolski, born November 11, 1900, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Park District Police Department in 1925.

Officer Wolski served in the U.S. Army from July 5, 1918 thru April 16, 1919 in Company 8 161st Regiment D.B., was a veteran of World War I and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Private. He was survived by his wife, Rose; twin children: Robert and Rose Marie and siblings: Andrew, Anna, Frank, Jacob and Leo.

The Chicago Park District Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on December 31, 1957. On January 1, 1958, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Police Department through an intergovernmental agreement. Fallen officers of the Chicago Park District Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Detective Sergeant Austin B. Woolsey

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
03 Apr 1891
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
23 Nov 1902
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Blunt Trauma
Age:
43
End of Watch:
13 Feb 1906
Unit of Assignment:
District 10, 27th Precinct - Desplaines
Date of Birth:
Apr 1862
Served:
14 years, 10 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant Austin B. Woolsey, Star # Unknown, aged 43 years, was a 14 year, 10 month, 10 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 10, 27th Precinct - Desplaines.

On approximately November 23, 1902, Detective Sergeant Woolsey arrested Thomas Brady, age 65, a blind man. During the arrest, Detective Sergeant Woolsey suffered a blow to the head by Brady’s cane and sustained a concussion. The injuries he sustained were so serious that he never fully recovered from the concussion suffering debilitating side effects. Detective Woolsey died four years later on February 13, 1906 due to the injuries resulting from this incident.

Thomas Brady was later released on a promise of good behavior. On November 29, 1906, while at Madison and Union Streets he once again became enraged swinging his heavy cane upon a group of people. He became enraged after several passerby failed to give heed to his appeals as he was peddling. Several small boys also tormented him. He struck Miss Gazalla Maskovitz, age 26 of 204 West 12th Street, with his cane. She sustained a dislocation of her jaw and three of her teeth were knocked out. Brady was then arrested and taken to the Desplaines Street station.

Detective Sergeant Woolsey was waked at his residence located at No. 215 South Sacramento Avenue (present day 310 South Sacramento Avenue), his funeral service was also held in his residence and he was laid to rest on February 16, 1906 in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant Austin B. Woolsey, born in April 1862, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 3, 1891.

Detective Sergeant Woolsey was survived by his wife, Bessie B. (nee Quinn) and son, Joseph P.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Probationary Police Officer Thomas Eugene Wortham IV

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Jun 2007
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6181
Incident Date:
19 May 2010
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
20 May 2010
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Professional Standards - Education and Training Division: Unit 044 - Recruit Training
Date of Birth:
20 Jan 1980
Served:
2 years, 11 months, 13 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
006 - Gresham

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 15
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 12-E: 27

Incident Details:

Probationary Police Officer Thomas Eugene Wortham IV, Star #6181, aged 30 years, was a 2 year, 11 month, 13 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Professional Standards - Education and Training Division: Unit 044 - Recruit Training, detailed to the 7th District - Englewood.

On May 19, 2010, at 11:27 p.m., Officer Wortham was off duty and visiting his parents' home following a trip to Washington, D.C. for National Police Week. As he left the residence two male offenders, Brian Floyd, age 20, of 3741 South Kilbourn Avenue and Marcus Floyd, age 19, of 3133 West Lexington Street, approached him at 354 East 85th Street. They announced a robbery and attempted to take his brand new Yamaha R1 motorcycle. Brian Floyd placed a .38 caliber Smith & Wesson revolver to Officer Wortham's head demanding the bike. At the same time Officer Wortham's father, a retired Chicago police sergeant, observed the robbery taking place. Sergeant Wortham yelled at Brian Floyd who in turn told him to mind his own business and fired a shot at him. This gave Officer Wortham the opportunity to draw his weapon, announce his office, and return fire. The two then exchanged gunfire at close range. At the same time Sergeant Wortham retrieved his firearm from the house and returned to find the Marcus Floyd assisting Brian Floyd into a maroon vehicle. He ran over and noticed two more offenders, Paris McGee, age 20, of 6333 South Ada Street and Toyius Taylor, age 29, of 4319 South Lamon Avenue, inside the vehicle one with a gun. The two occupants in the vehicle seeing Sergeant Wortham approaching backed away and fled the scene leaving the two Floyds behind. At the same time one of the Floyd's raised their gun at which time Sergeant Wortham fired at them. Marcus Floyd dropped Brian Floyd and then fled on foot heading northbound on Dr. Martin Luther King Drive.

Sergeant Wortham then retreated to locate and aide his son. Officer Wortham was located approximately 60 feet west of the original scene where he had apparently been struck by the maroon vehicle. He had been dragged under the vehicle to the mouth of the alley and became dislodged when the vehicle reversed direction to allow the Floyd to enter. Officer Wortham was struck by gunfire once in the chest. He was transported to Advocate Christ Medical Center in Oak Lawn where he was pronounced dead at 12:07 a.m. on May 20, 2010. Brian Floyd sustained four gunshot wounds to the torso. He was transported to Christ Hospital by CFD Ambulance #55 and was pronounced dead by Dr. Jones at 5:30 a.m. on May 20, 2010.

The three surviving offenders, Paris McGee, Toyius Taylor and Marcus Floyd, were later arrested. Marcus Floyd was charged with 1st degree murder, felony murder, attempt murder and discharge of a firearm. On October 19, 2015, Marcus Floyd was found Guilty of the Murder of Officer Wortham, Guilty of the Attempted Murder of Sergeant Wortham, Guilty in the death of co-defendant Brian Floyd and Not Guilty of Discharge of a firearm. The Jury's verdict was based on Floyd's accountability for the crime. The Jury was uncertain if Floyd actually fired a weapon which resulted in the Not Guilty verdict.

Officer Wortham was waked at A.R. Leak and Sons Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Trinity United Church of Christ located at 421 West 95th Street and he was laid to rest on May 28, 2010 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Probationary Police Officer Thomas Eugene Wortham IV, born January 20, 1980, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 4, 2007 and he attended the Jackson Street Police Academy. Prior to entering the Chicago Police Academy Officer Wortham served with the Evergreen Park Police Department for eight months. Officer Wortham was still a Probationary Police Officer at the time of his death. His probationary status was extended due to him deploying while serving in the U.S. Army National Reserve. Time on leave away from the Department did not count towards his 18 month probationary period.

Officer Wortham served in the U.S. Army National Guard and had recently returned from his second tour of duty in Iraq while serving with the Wisconsin Army National Guard. While in the National Guard he served in the 1st Battalion, 125th Infantry and the 15th Calvary, and rose to the rank of 1st lieutenant, receiving many commendations. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his parents: Carolyn Mary (nee Greene), age 61 and Thomas Eugene, III (CPD), age 63 and sister, Sandra.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #HS266838.

On January 11, 2011, Officer Wortham's star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Detective John A. Wren

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 Dec 1896
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3987
Incident Date:
04 Mar 1910
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
05 Mar 1910
Unit of Assignment:
District 15, 38th Precinct - East Chicago
Date of Birth:
09 Oct 1874
Served:
13 years, 2 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 39
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 33-E: 9

Incident Details:

Detective John A. Wren, Star #3987, aged 35 years, was a 13 year, 2 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 15, 38th Precinct - East Chicago.

On March 4, 1910, at 4:30 a.m., Detective Wren was on duty working in plain clothes with his partner, Detective Patrick J. Quinn. The detectives were walking South on Townsend Street (present day Hudson Avenue). As they approached Chicago Avenue they observed three suspicious men, “Black Hand“ suspects. The detectives ordered the men to halt and announced their office. In response to the command, the three assailants drew weapons and opened fire without warning. Detective Wren was shot two times in the abdomen and collapsed to ground. Detective Quinn was shot once in the foot and also collapsed. Despite being wounded both Detective’s drew their weapons and returned fire, firing over a dozen rounds. Detective Wren was transported to Passavant Hospital where he was pronounced dead on March 5, 1910.

Detective Quinn later stated that he was sure they struck one of the gunmen as they made good their escape. No trace of the gunmen was found and all reserves were called in to conduct a manhunt. Little information was obtainable in this case. However, three men, Joe Glumaky, Mike Mekevitt and Fred Vogt, were later held for questioning at the Shakespeare Station. The men had previous arrest histories and were arrested at the time for a robbery, but denied any connection to Detective Wren’s murder. A fourth suspect, Barrato Cornico, was later arrested for the murder. Detective Quinn identified him as one of the three men. However, Cornico was later released after several of his friends corroborated his alibi.

Detective Wren was waked at his residence located at 17 East Chestnut Street, his funeral mass was held at Holy Name Cathedral located at 730 North Wabash Avenue and he was laid to rest on March 7, 1910 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Detective John A. Wren, October 9, 1874, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 14, 1896.

Detective Wren was survived by his wife and mother, Margaret (nee Bresnen).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2703.

Following Detective Wren’s death, the police department formed the Black Hand Squad to combat Mafia affiliated groups responsible for crimes in the Italian neighborhoods of Chicago. It was believed at the time that Detective Wren’s death was attributed to a “Black Hand” gang and was the impetuous that led to a resolution forming the Black Hand Squad.

On October 14, 1910, Detective Wren's star was retired by General Superintendent LeRoy T. Steward and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, City Hall, 121 North LaSalle Street, Room 505, Office of the Superintendent of Police. Detective Shea's star was one of fourteen stars added to the newly instituted memorial to preserve the memory of detectives killed in the line of duty. The tradition of retiring a star number was born. In 1928, the star case was moved to the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters again moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Detective Wren's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman Clarence E. Wright

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
1876
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
255
Incident Date:
29 Nov 1882
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
28
End of Watch:
29 Nov 1882
Unit of Assignment:
3rd Precinct - Desplaines Street Station
Date of Birth:
1854
Served:
6 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Graceland Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 21
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 10-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Clarence E. Wright, Star #255, aged 28 years, was a 6 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd Precinct - Desplaines Street Station.

On November 29, 1882, Officer Wright was on duty and sitting at the Lockup Keeper’s desk in the lockup at the Desplaines Street Station. He was talking to Officer Jennings when Lieutenant Ward called him upstairs to his office. The Lieutenant handed him an arrest warrant charging William Allen, Alias Joe Dehlmor, age 32, with disorderly conduct and ordered Officer Wright to go and execute the warrant. The lieutenant also stated that Allen could be found at No. 37 West Washington Street (present day 528 West Washington Street). In addition he stated that the complainant, Mr. Merrill, would be waiting for him at the Chicago Fire Department, Chemical 1’s house located on the corner of Washington and Clinton Streets.

Officer Wright, at the suggestion of the Lieutenant left the station with Patrolman Tim J. Foley and headed to the engine house. Upon arrival the officers located Mr. Merrill who related that Allen had just arrived home and that he was in his room, No. 11 on the second floor. Officer Wright replied. “All right, come along, let’s go over an get him.” While enroute, the officers ran into Detective Fletcher from the Harrison Street Station. He was in the company of William Hizer of No. 174 Harrison Street. Detective Fletcher related that he too was on the lookout for Allen and was also enroute to his residence to arrest him. He stated that Allen had nearly killed a man just before noon at the Northwestern Depot. Mr. Hizer had traced Allen to the Washington Street address and they were on their way to get help before entering the building. The three officers after a brief conversation entered Allen’s building and went to his room.

At approximately 6:30 p.m., Officer Wright knocked on the apartment door and heard a women’s voice from inside say, “Get up Bill and see who it is.” After a minute, the door opened about half way by the woman. Before Officer Wright could say anything, a gunshot rang out. Officer Wright staggered back a few steps into room No. 9 with his hand to his head. He collapsed to the floor with his feet doubled back underneath him and died instantly. Officer Foley and Detective Fletcher startled by what had just occurred retreated and returned fire. They fired blindly towards the room and in the commotion gave Allen an opportunity to escape down the stairs. Allen fled from the building and tripped on the stairs leading from the building to the sidewalk. Per a witness, Mrs. Sullivan, Allen recovered himself and casually walked away. Allen leisurely walked eastbound on Washington Street towards the entrance of the footway tunnel. As soon as the other officers recovered themselves they rushed into the room where Allen had been only to find him gone. The only occupants in the room were Mrs. Sinead and Alice Hutchinson, who claimed to be Allen’s wife. The officers placed the two women into custody as well as James Smead who was found somewhere else on the premises. Detective Fletcher then called the Desplaines Street Station and summoned the patrol wagon.

Within a few minutes, Captain Bonfield and his men were onscene. A description of Allen was obtained and messages were transmitted to several stations and telegraphed to the Chiefs of Police in Cleveland, St. Louis, Milwaukee and a number of other cities. Officer Wright was taken to the station where he was laid on a cot in the roll call room and subjected to inspection by fellow officers. Signal Sergeant John Wheeler found that the fatal shot entered about an inch and a half in front of Officer Wrights right ear near the cheekbone.

Officer Foley and Detective Fletcher were discharged from the service of the City of Chicago and the Police Department following the incident. They were cited for failure chase after William Allen after he murdered Officer Wright.

On December 3, 1882, Patrolman Patrick N. Mulvihill received information on the whereabouts of Allen and was shot and killed by Allen as he attempted to apprehend him. Allen fled and was found hiding in a coal box at Kinzie and Green Streets by Detective Sergeant John Wheeler, who shot and killed him.

Officer Wright was waked at his residence located at No. 3835 Indiana Street (present day 6382 West ¬¬¬¬Grand Avenue) and was laid to rest on December 2, 1882 in Graceland Cemetery, 4001 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Clarence E. Wright, born in 1854, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in 1876.

Officer Wright was survived by mother, sister and brother.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3 and Case #2801.

Patrolman Gerald Leo Wright

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Oct 1973
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3845
Incident Date:
06 Aug 1993
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
46
End of Watch:
07 Aug 1993
Unit of Assignment:
6th District - Gresham
Date of Birth:
10 Oct 1946
Served:
19 years, 9 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
006 - Gresham

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Hope Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 5
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 45-W: 19

Incident Details:

Patrolman Gerald Leo Wright, Star #3845, aged 46 years, was a 19 year, 9 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 6th District - Gresham.

On August 6, 1993, at 11:29 p.m., Officer Wright was off duty and had just ended his shift on the third watch. He and his partner, Patrolman James Evitt, stopped to visit John and Shaker Sweis, owners of Pat's Food Store located at 934 West 79th Street. The officers would often frequent the store after their shift and had struck up a friendly relationship with the owners. They would also converse with the kids that hung out at the store and learn of the gang activity in the area. Officer Wright stepped out of the store and spoke to, Marlon Brown, a Four Corner Hustler and tenant residing in the apartment above the store. He told Brown that he was instrumental in controlling the gang activity on the corner and encouraged him to continue to do so. While the two were talking, Brown observed two Gangster Disciples, Steven Hass (aka Ken Jones and Kim Smith), age 18, of 8434 South Hermitage Avenue and Rafael Jackson, age 16, of 11301 South Lowe Avenue, walking eastbound on 79th Street. As the two passed Campbell's Hoagie Shop located at 943 1/2 West 79th Street, Brown then saw Hass pull a .22 caliber Tech 22 semi-automatic firearm from his waistband and pointed it at Officer Wright and Brown. It was at this exact time that Officer Brown turned toward the entrance of the store and suddenly became the unintended victim of gang violence. Hass fired 5 times and Officer Wright was struck by a bullet under his right arm. Brown turned and pushed open the door to the stairwell leading to his apartment and ran upstairs. Officer Brown entered the store and told Shaker Sweis that he was shot and collapsed to the floor. Once in his apartment, Brown looked out the window and observed Hass running westbound on 79th Street toward Morgan Avenue. Officer Wright was transported to Christ Hospital and Medical Center in Oak Lawn by CFD Ambulance #14 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Holevar at 3:13 a.m. on August 7, 1993.

During the investigation it was learned that Hass and Jackson were seeking retaliation for a gang shooting that had occurred the previous week in which Deonta Morgan was murdered. Hass believed that Brown, a rival gang member, had been involved in the incident. On August 7, 1993, at 7:00 a.m., Hass was arrested at his grandmother's house located at 8434 South Hermitage Avenue. On August 9, 1993, at 3:00 a.m., Jackson was arrested at his home. In January, 1996, Steven Hass stood trial by jury and was found guilty of first degree murder. On March 7, 1996, he was sentenced to the maximum of 100 years in prison by Judge Thomas A. Hutt. Hass pleaded with the judge saying, "I was never too much taught the right way of things." The judge also paid little attention to a character letter written on Hass' behalf by Father Michael Pfleger of St. Sabina Parish. Hass will be eligible for parole in 2045. Rafael Jackson, pleaded guilty to murder and was sentenced to 55 years in prison. Jackson will be eligible for parole in 2021.

Officer Wright was waked at McGann Funeral Home located at 10727 South Pulaski Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Queen of Martyrs Catholic Church located at 10233 South Central Park Avenue, Evergreen Park, Illinois and he was cremated on August 10, 1993 in Mount Hope Cemetery, 11500 South Fairfield Avenue, Worth Township, Illinois.

Patrolman Gerald Leo Wright, born October 10, 1946, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 22, 1973. He earned 1 Department Commendation and 35 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Wright served in the U.S. Army from January 16, 1963 thru January 14, 1966 and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Private. He also served in the U.S. Army Reserve from January 14, 1966 thru January 1969 and was Honorably Discharged. Officer Wright was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his ex-wife, Sandra Jean Wright Russell (nee Koog), age 52; children: Jon Gerald, age 27, Rachel Elizabeth, age 16 and Sandy Ann Roach (nee Wright), age 31; parents, Dorothy and Lester (CPD) and siblings: Jim, Joseph, Marilou McCarthy, Michael and Paul.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #X360576.

On June 8, 1994, Officer Wright's star was retired by Superintendent Matt L. Rodriguez and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Wright's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.