LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

Checkerboard Band

Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Dec 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
881
Incident Date:
30 Oct 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
47
End of Watch:
31 Oct 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 9 - Kensington
Date of Birth:
03 Oct 1879
Served:
18 years, 10 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Cedar Park Cemetery - Calumet Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 11-W: 11

Incident Details:

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley, Star #881, aged 47 years, was an 18 year, 10 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 9 - Kensington.

On October 30, 1926, Detectives from the Kensington station were searching the area for a notorious car thief, Timothy Hennessy, who was a known member of an organized gang of auto thieves. At 2:15 p.m., Sergeant Beardsley and his partner, Sergeant Andrew Harrah, located Hennessy’s cohorts, Stanley Gracyas and Henry Perry, in a garage located at 312 West 116th Street. Gracyas and Perry were attempting to transport a stolen car being temporarily stored in the garage that was recently rented by Hennessy. The sergeants were able to safely arrest Gracyas, but Perry was able to escape. Sergeant Harrah went back to the scene to investigate the garage and Gracyas’ rooming house while Sergeant Beardsley dealt with Gracyas. Once Gracyas was alone with Beardsley, he pulled out a concealed revolver and fired at Beardsley. Gracyas then jumped into an automobile with Hennessey and escaped. As they were escaping, Sergeant James J. O'Brien appeared. O’Brien exchanged gunfire with Gracyas as they made good their escape and was struck by a bullet in the right hand. Officer Beardsley succumbed to his wounds the next day on October 31, 1926.

After an extensive manhunt, Henry Perry was located and arrested a block away. On December 7, 1926, the Coroner recommended the arrest of Gracyas as the principal and Tim Hennessey as an accessory and held Henry Perry as an accessory. On February 8, 1927, Gracyas was apprehended, brought back from Colorado and turned over to the Sheriff. Hennessy was also arrested and charged with accessory to murder. On April 15, 1927, Hennessey's and Perry's cases were stricken off the record by Judge Sullivan.

Sergeant Beardsley’s funeral service was held at Carson’s Morgue located at 119th Street and Stewart Avenue and he was laid to rest in Cedar Park Cemetery, 12540 South Halsted Street, Calumet Park, Illinois.

Sergeant Floyd A. Beardsley, born October 3, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on December 23, 1907. He earned 5 Credible Mentions during his career. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915. On June 28, 1921, he was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Beardsley was a Master Mason. He was survived by his wife, father and brother.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7646.

On September 14, 1928, Patrolman James J. O'Brien would be shot in the line of duty dying two days later on September 16, 1928.

Patrolman William Y. Bell

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
17 Jun 1964
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3565
Incident Date:
06 Feb 1967
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly
Age:
25
End of Watch:
06 Feb 1967
Unit of Assignment:
2nd District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
12 May 1941
Served:
2 years, 7 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 14
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 27-E: 10

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Y. Bell, Star #3565, aged 25 years, was a 2 year, 7 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 2nd District - Wabash.

On February 6, 1967, Officer Bell, while off duty and in plain clothes, assisted several police officers involved in the pursuit of a robbery suspect. Officer Bell had parked his car with the motor running and had gone inside a laundry located at 1653 East 71st Street. He approached Patrolmen Elkstrom and Walker and identified himself as an off duty police officer. Moments earlier, the manager from a grocery store had alerted Officer Elkstrom of a robbery as he was writing parking tickets. The three officers began to chase William Baird, age 27. Baird had just robbed the Jewel Tea Company supermarket located at 1709 East 71st Street, taking $1,200.00 in currency. Another officer, Patrolman Reynolds, who had radioed in the report of the robbery, gave chase in his squad car unaware that Bell was a policeman. As Officer Reynolds gave chase, Baird opened fire as he hid in a building vestibule located at 1647 East 69th Street firing at Patrolmen James Knightly and Patrick O'Brien with a .45 caliber revolver. A fierce gun battle ensued and Officers Knightly and O'Brien returned fire, firing into the vestibule where Baird was holdup. Officer Knightly was shot in his chest and leg. Officer O’Brien sustained several bullet holes in his jacket and a superficial gunshot wound. During the gun battle, Officer Bell took cover in a snowdrift near the building where Baird was holdup and had also fired several shots at Baird. Officer Reynolds arrived on scene and peered around a corner of a building with only his blue jacketed arm showing and observed Officer Bell firing. Reynolds yelled "Hold it" and Bell turned around and fired several shots at Reynolds thinking he was another holdup man. Reynolds, not knowing Bell was a policemen, then returned fire hitting Bell three times thinking he was Baird’s accomplice. Baird was killed in the shootout and the money taken from the store was recovered.

Officer Bell was waked at Ernest Griffin Funeral Home, his funeral mass was held at Olivet Baptist Church located at 3101 South Martin Luther King Junior Drive and he was laid to rest on February 10, 1967 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman William Y. Bell, born May 12, 1941, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 17, 1964.

Officer Bell was survived by his wife, Valerie.

Detective Harry A. Belluomini

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Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Jul 1957
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
10021
Incident Date:
20 Jul 1992
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
58
End of Watch:
20 Jul 1992
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 650 - Area 5 Detectives
Date of Birth:
08 Oct 1933
Served:
33 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 16
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 7-W: 19

Incident Details:

Detective Harry A. Belluomini, Star #10021, aged 58 years, was a retired 33 year veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Investigative Services - Detective Division: Unit 650 - Area 5 Detectives Property Crimes.

In 1988, Detective Belluomini retired from the Chicago Police Department and began working as a Special Deputy Marshal for the U.S. Marshall Service.

On July 20, 1992, at approximately 5:30 p.m., inmate Jeffrey Erickson attempted to escape the custody of U.S. Marshals in the underground parking garage of the Dirksen Federal Building. Hidden in his mouth, Erickson had a handcuff key which he used to remove his restraints. After freeing himself, he assaulted and disarmed a U.S. Marshal. With the marshal's gun, he immediately shot and wounded Deputy U.S. Marshal Ray Frakes, age 30. Then, he encountered Special Deputy Marshal Harry Belluomini and shot him in the chest. U.S. Marshall Belluomini was able to return fire and strike Erickson in the back. Erickson committed suicide after additional officers confronted him and realized escape was impossible. Special Deputy Marshall Harry Belluomini and Deputy U.S. Marshal Roy Frakes were transported to Northwestern Memorial Hospital and were pronounced dead upon arrival at 5:57 p.m. on July 20, 1992.

Robert Burke was sentenced to 20 years in prison for perjuring himself to a grand jury about his role in providing Jeffrey Erickson with a handcuff key.

Detective Belluomini was waked at Smith-Corcoran Funeral Home located at 6150 North Cicero Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Juliana Church located at 7142 North Osceola Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 24, 1992 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Detective Harry Belluomini, born October 8, 1933, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 1, 1957.

Detective Belluomini was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Milly; children: Anne Marie (CPD), Karen (CPD) and Michael (CPD) and sister.

Patrolman Joseph A. Bender Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 Aug 1919
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2958
Incident Date:
10 Feb 1927
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
11 Feb 1927
Unit of Assignment:
District 11 - Englewood
Date of Birth:
25 May 1893
Served:
7 years, 6 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
007 - Englewood

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 5
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-W: 14

Incident Details:

Patrolman Joseph A. Bender, Sr., Star #2958, aged 33 years, was a 7 year, 6 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 11 - Englewood, detailed to the Detective Bureau.

On February 10, 1927, 10:00 p.m., Officer Joseph Bender, while off duty and in in civilian clothes, was returning home after attending a double wake at 5611 South Wood Street. The wake was for a mother and daughter, Mary Kelly Mooney and Mary Mooney Koppelmann. While at the wake some in attendance took note of a suspicious auto parked outside, but no one took any further actions to investigate it. As Officer Bender, unaware of the auto, left the wake the car pulled away and began to follow him home. Officer Bender lived nearby at 1642 West 57th Street. He had almost reached his home when the automobile pulled up beside him and the two men inside drew his attention. The two armed offenders, William Gall, age 18 and Victor Walinski, age 19, exited the automobile and approached Officer Bender announcing a robbery. They ordered Officer Bender to put up his hands. Instead, Officer Bender reached for his service revolver as one of the gunmen opened fire. Officer Bender was struck in the chest just above his heart and collapsed to the sidewalk as the gunmen fled. Several other policemen attending the wake heard the gunfire and attempted to give chase to the fleeing auto, but were unable to keep up on foot. Officer Bender was rushed to German Deaconess Hospital on Morgan Street where he died at 12:22 a.m. on February 11, 1927.

While enroute to the hospital, Bender told those riding with him what happened. Bender said, “They tried to stick me up and I wouldn’t have it.” It was believed the the robbery was similar to one committed at 5639 S. Hamilton Avenue, where Elmore Bell had been shot in front of his home. Captain John Egan stated that he believed the same two men had committed the two crimes. It was later learned, after the investigation, that Officer Bender had been shot with another officer's service revolver. That officer had been robbed in the exact same way by Gall and Walinski hours before Officer Bender was murdered. Both officers were in civilian clothes.

On February 18, 1927, William Gall and Victor Walinski were arrested after they wrecked a car they had stolen. During their interrogation they confessed to the murder of Office Bender. On February 27, 1927, they were indicted by the Grand Jury. Gall and Walinski were also found to be responsible for over 50 other robberies. On September 19, 1927, both boys were sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet on a plea of guilty to murder by Judge Eller.

Officer Bender was laid to rest in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Joseph A. Bender, Sr., born May 25, 1893, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 5, 1919. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $300.00 during his career.

Officer Bender was survived by his wife, Genevieve and son, Joseph A., Jr., age 8.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7664.

Patrolman LeRoy N. Berry Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Jul 1966
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12789
Incident Date:
09 Oct 1969
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
09 Oct 1969
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Kensington
Date of Birth:
08 Sep 1942
Served:
3 years, 2 months, 22 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Washington Memorial Cemetery - Homewood, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 19
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 43-E: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman LeRoy N. Berry, Jr., Star #12789, aged 27 years, was a 3 year, 2 month, 22 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Kensington.

On October 9, 1969, at 9:37 p.m., Officer Berry was 10-99 on beat 508 and responded to a disturbance call in the parking lot of St. Thaddeus Catholic Church located at 9540 South Harvard Avenue. Upon arrival he had placed two youths into custody. He placed them inside the backseat of his squad car and began question them from the front seat. As the youths sat in the squad car, one of the youths produced a gun and fired at Officer Berry. Officer Berry fell out of the driver’s seat and fell to the ground mortally wounded. The two youths exited the car and opened the car’s trunk in an attempt to steal two shotguns, but when they opened the trunk the squad cars siren went off, a security feature. The two youths scared away by the siren fled the scene over the nearby Chicago and Western Indiana Railroad tracks. Priests Thomas Rafferty and John Cassidy saw the two youths fleeing the scene after they heard the siren from the squad car go off. When the priests went to investigate they found Officer Berry laying face down on the ground next the front passenger side tire of his squad car He was the apparent victim of an armed robbery and his service revolver, wallet and police star were missing. Father Rafferty, seeing that Officer Berry was near death, administered last rites. Three bullet holes were found in the squad car, one in the roof and one each in the front and side windows. Officer Berry was transported to Roseland Community Hospital by beat 670 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Lucine at 10:50 p.m. on October 9, 1969.

Descriptions of the offenders were given by Fathers Cassidy and Rafferty in addition to an unidentified witness. On October 10, 1969, based on the descriptions, police arrested Jonathan Brown, Age 20, of 723 East 91st Street, Charles Moore, age 21, of 9111 South Normal Avenue and Sedrick Moore, age 18, of 614 West 95th Street. On October 10, 1969, Hayden was released without charging. Brown and Moore were charged with murder, held to the Grand Jury without bond by Judge George E. Dolezal, On January 20, 1970, a true bill was returned on Brown and Moore. On February 10, 1970, both Brown and Moore were found not guilty by Judge Romuti.

Officer Berry was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 13, 1969 in Washington Memorial Cemetery, 701 Ridge Road, Homewood, Illinois.

Patrolman LeRoy N. Berry, Jr., born September 8, 1942, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 18, 1966 and was in Recruit Class 66-14A at the O'Brien Street Police Academy. He earned 1 Department Commendation and 1 Honorable Mention during his career.

Officer Berry served in U.S Marine Corps and was Honorably Discahrged. He was survived by his parents: Gertrude (nee Green) and LeRoy N., Sr. and siblings: Paul W., three other brothers and three sisters.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #H395067.

Detective Sergeant John L. N. Bialk

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Jan 1903
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
474
Incident Date:
21 Sep 1916
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
40
End of Watch:
24 Sep 1916
Unit of Assignment:
District 24, 40th Precinct - Lincoln Park
Date of Birth:
09 Dec 1875
Served:
13 years, 8 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 33-E: 4

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant John L. N. Bialk, Star #474, aged 40 years, was a 13 year, 8 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 24, 40th Precinct - Lincoln Park.

On September 21, 1916, Mrs. Nellie M. Acker, a landlady, went to the North Halsted Street station, and reported that a boarder, Charles N. Depew, had chased her from her home the day before. She also reported that Depew threatened to kill her and other boarders of the home. She was requesting a police escort to enter her home and remove Depew. An officer at the station house told Mrs. Depew to go back to her residence and wait for an officer, who would arrive shortly. She left the station and returned to her home. Detective Sergeant John Bialk was then dispatched to investigate the reports of the man who was threatening people. He was sent to a rooming house located at 1925 North Park Avenue (present day Lincoln Park West).

At 2:20 p.m., Detective Sergeant Bialk arrived and met Mrs. Acker. As they entered the home, Detective Sergeant Bialk confronted Depew. In response Depew produced a firearm and shot Mrs. Acker. Detective Sergeant Bialk attempted to disarm Depew and in the process was also shot in the abdomen. It had been thirty minutes since Detective Sergeant Bialk had been dispatched and reports began to come in to the station of the shooting. Depew was now running around the house waving his gun at other boarders. Additional police were dispatched to the scene and Detective Sergeant Bialk was transported to Alexian Brothers Hospital. Depew then surrendered without incident. After placing Depew in custody he was taken to Alexian Brothers Hospital so Detective Sergeant Bialk could identify him as his shooter before he died. Detective Sergeant Bialk lingered in the hospital and succumbed to his injuries three days later on September 24, 1916.

On September 29, 1916, Depew was charged with intentional manslaughter and held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner. On January 9, 1917, he was acquitted of all charges by Judge Fitch.

Detective Sergeant Bialk was waked at his residence located at 2110 North High Street (present day Janssen Avenue) and he was laid to rest on September 27, 1916 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant John L. N. Bialk, born December 9, 1875, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 15, 1903. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915.

Detective Sergeant Bialk was survived by his wife and five children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3042.

Detective Sergeant Stanley J. Birns

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
322
Incident Date:
16 Jul 1914
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly
Age:
34
End of Watch:
16 Jul 1914
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Bureau
Date of Birth:
27 Sep 1879
Served:
8 years, 3 months, 14 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-W: 13

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant Stanley J. Birns, Star #322, aged 34 years, was an 8 year, 3 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Bureau.

On July 16, 1914, Detective Sergeant Birns, under the command of First Deputy Superintendent M. C. Funkhouser, was assigned to lead a team of officers on a vice raid at Swann’s Poolroom located at 67 East 22nd Street (present day Cermak Road) in the cities levee district. The men were working in plain clothes. At the same time, a group of city morals inspectors, Special Police, under the command of Chief Morals Inspector W. C. Dannenberg were in the area also working in plainclothes. The morals inspectors were originally supposed to carry out raids on the North side of the city, but ended up at the same place as Detective Sergeant Birns.

Dannenberg’s men, Special Police Officers Fred Amart and Joseph Merril, Railway Fireman James Carroll and Investigator Johnson, had just finished raiding a spot known as The Turf where four prostitutes were openly soliciting business. The Clark Street patrol wagon was summoned to transport the four women and one man they had arrested. After the patrol wagon left, Dannenberg’s men then headed East to meet Inspector Dannenberg on Michigan Avenue. While walking to the location, the inspectors were followed by a group of neighborhood regulars. The regulars attempted to deny the group of men their element of surprise by being loud and obnoxious. The regulars then began throwing bricks at the men.

At 9:35 p.m., Dannenberg’s men reached Swann’s Poolroom and encountered Detective Sergeant Stanley Birns and his men. As Dannenberg’s men approached the poolroom with the neighborhood regulars on their back, Birn’s men observed them coming with the regulars following them. Detective Sergeant Birns and his men hurried for the crowd and heard someone yell, “Look out! They all have guns.” This was most likely shouted by one of the neighborhood regulars referring to Dannenberg’s men. Tragically, in a case of mistaken identity, gunfire erupted. Detective Sergeant Birns and his men drew their weapons and Dannenberg’s men opened fire in response thinking Birn’s men were attacking them. The two groups of men exchanged gunfire as pedestrians ran to escape the gunfire. One pedestrian, Roscoe Vantile was shot in the leg. Amart ran to the doorway of the pool hall, got behind a post and fired at Birns. Birns was hit but fired back. Amart then ran up the stairs where he was later found by responding police.

The sound of the gunfire brought policemen running in from the surrounding area. Officers from the 22nd Street Station, Bill Schubert’s Gambling crew and the Vice Quad all responded. When the smoke cleared all of the wounded and dead were identified and transported to the morgue or hospitals. Detective Sergeant Stanley Birns was the only death recorded in the incident. Investigator Johnson was arrested and taken to the 22nd Street Station accused of firing the shot that killed Birns. Special Police Officer Fred Amart was also arrested and accompanied Johnson to the station. Both men were questioned by General Superintendent James Gleason, First Deputy Superintendent Funkhouser and Captain Michael P. Ryan at various times. At the conclusion of the questioning all officers involved were exonerated and no charges were filed.

Detective Sergeant Birns was waked at his residence located at 1848 North Western Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 21, 1914 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant Stanley J. Birns, born September 27, 1879, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 2, 1906. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective by order of the city council on November 10, 1913.

Detective Sergeant Birns was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3004.

Patrolman Clarence H. Bixler

Image Not Available
Agency:
Rogers Park Police Department
Appointed Date:
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
21 Jun 1892
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
22 Jun 1892
Unit of Assignment:
Patrol
Date of Birth:
31 Aug 1856
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
024 - Rogers Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 5, Line 21
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-E: 29

Incident Details:

Patrolman Clarence H. Bixler, Star # Unknown, aged 35 years, was a veteran of the Rogers Park Police Department, assigned to Patrol.

On June 21, 1892, at 2:00 p.m., Frank Doyle borrowed his brother's bicycle without asking his permission and rode to Rosehill Cemetery. This angered William Doyle and he started in pursuit of his brother intending, as he said, “to take the wheel away from him by force, if necessary.” The two brothers met in the cemetery and William demanded the return of his bicycle. Frank replied, "I will give it to you when I am ready and not before." William then said, "We won't settle it now, but we will when we get back to Rogers Park," as he turned and left the cemetery.

Frank Doyle rode back to Rogers Park, arriving there at 7:30 p.m. On the way he met several friends, and to one he remarked, "I am going to fix the first man who tries to separate me from my brother tonight." Subsequent developments proved that his prophesy was true.

Near the Police Station located at 7075 North Clark Street in the village of Rogers Park the two brothers met again. A crowd formed and urged the two to fight, it is said, but Frank Doyle showed no such inclination. He went to the home of a friend. It was there that Officer Bixler encountered him and said, "I understand you and William have been quarreling again," in a joking way.

Before he had a chance to utter another word Frank Doyle produced a revolver from his pocket and fired. Officer Bixler was struck in the head and collapsed to the sidewalk unconscious. Doyle quietly put the revolver back in his pocket and walked to his home four blocks away. At the front steps of his house he paused a moment as if hesitating whether to enter or not, suddenly he drew his revolver again and put a bullet into his right temple dying instantly. His mother summoned assistance and the remains were carried into the parlor of his home.

Two men found Officer Bixler lying on the sidewalk, and they carried him to the town hall, where a physician was summoned. He was very weak from loss of blood and it was not believed that he survive over night. The bullet had entered his forehead just over the right eye, lodging in his brain. All efforts to revive him were in vain. The police did not arrest William Doyle.

The Doyle brothers always bore a bad reputation in Rogers Park, and were known to cause the police considerable trouble.

Officer Bixler was laid to rest in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Clarence H. Bixler was born August 31, 1856.

Officer Bixler was unmarried and lived in Rogers Park.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

The Rogers Park Police Department was absorbed into the Chicago Police Department after the Village of Rogers Park was annexed by the City of Chicago on April 4, 1893.

On April 29, 1878 Rogers Park was incorporated as a village of Illinois governed by six trustees. Early settler Philip Rogers bought this lakeside land in 1836 for $1.25 an acre. His son-in-law Patrick L. Touhy developed the area and started its rise to the bustling residential community that would eventually be incorporated into Chicago. It was bounded by Howard (7600 North) on the north, Devon Avenue on the south (6400 North), Lake Michigan on the east and Ridge Boulevard (1848-2100 West) on the west.

Patrolman Samuel M. Black

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Nov 1917
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1121
Incident Date:
16 Dec 1944
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
57
End of Watch:
16 Dec 1944
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Wabash
Date of Birth:
15 Dec 1887
Served:
27 years, 0 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery - Glenwood, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 5
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 39-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman Samuel M. Black, Star #1121, aged 57 years, was a 27 year, 0 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Wabash.

On December 16, 1944, Patrolman Ezra Caldwell and Patrolman Samuel M. Black were working beat 151 when they responded to radio call of a domestic disturbance at 5147 South Prairie Avenue in the first floor apartment. Officer Black was the first to enter the building and was met by Kermit Bredlove in the hallway. Bredlove asked Officer Black if he was looking for him and when Black said yes Bredlove drew his firearm and shot him at point-blank range in the face. Officer Black collapsed to the floor dying shortly after while Bredlove took his service revolver. Officer Caldwell, while in the squad car, heard the gunfire and went to investigate while Bredlove proceeded down the hallway and exited the building onto the front steps. It was on the steps where he was confronted by Officer Caldwell. Bredlove fired at Caldwell who returned fire and struck Bredlove three times. Officer Caldwell then attempted to take cover behind a truck parked on the street when he slipped. It was at this time Bredlove fired another round which would eventually prove fatal to Officer Caldwell.

Officer Caldwell continued to return fire until beat 162 arrived at the scene. Patrolman James McKenna exited his squad car and immediately fired at Bredlove after seeing Officer Caldwell lying on the ground gravely wounded. Bredlove was eventually arrested and sustained more than six gunshots to the chest and abdominal area during the shootout. Officer’s Black and Caldwell were transported to Provident Hospital where they were pronounced dead on arrival. Bredlove was taken to the Bridewell Hospital where he would later recover from his injuries.

Further investigation revealed that Bredlove had killed his wife, Goldine, just prior to the two officers arriving on the scene. The two had been arguing because Kermit Bredlove believed his wife had been flirting with another man at a party. Bredlove had shot his wife six time which caused neighbors to call for police.

Kermit Bredlove was charged with three counts of murder. He stood trial and on March 9, 1945 was found guilty and sentenced to 199 years in jail. On April 18, 1945, his sentence was amended, by a guilty verdict in the murder of Officer Black, to death by the electric chair. On September 14, 1945, Bredlove was executed in the electric chair.

Officer Black was laid to rest on December 20, 1944 in Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens Cemetery, 18301 South Glenwood Thornton Road, Glenwood, Illinois.

Patrolman Samuel M. Black, born December 15, 1987, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 22, 1917. He earned 2 Credible Mentions and 2 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $360.00 during his career.

Officer Black was survived by his wife.

Patrolman Patrick E. Blackwell

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 May 1883
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1235
Incident Date:
10 May 1905
Cause of Death:
Fall - Down Elevator Shaft
Age:
39
End of Watch:
20 May 1905
Unit of Assignment:
District 6, 15th Precinct - South Chicago
Date of Birth:
1866
Served:
12 years, 0 months, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 35
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 62-E: 8

Incident Details:

Patrolman Patrick E. Blackwell, Star #1235, aged 39 years, was a 12 year, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 6, 15th Precinct - South Chicago.

On May 10, 1905, Officer Blackwell was regulating traffic in the rear of the Siegel, Cooper and Company Department Store located at No. 315 South Wabash Avenue (present day 438 South Wabash Avenue). There was located an elevator shaft in the street which allowed the local businesses to accept deliveries. The shaft was open and as Officer Blackwell was directing traffic, he stepped backward to permit an approaching wagon to pass. The officer was bumped by the wagon as it passed and he fell into the elevator shaft, which was very narrow. He fell 18 feet and sustained a fracture to the skull from which he died 10 days later on May 20, 1905.

Officer Blackwell was waked at his residence located at 6748 South Calumet Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Holy Cross Church located at 4541 South Wood Street and he was laid to rest on May 22, 1905 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Section 40, Lot 259.

Patrolman Patrick E. Blackwell, born in 1866, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 2, 1893.

Officer Blackwell was a member of St. Thomas Court of the Catholic Order of Foresters. He was survived by his wife, Julia; children: John and Minnie and brother, John.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #2834.

On October 14, 1910, Officer Blackwell's star was retired by General Superintendent LeRoy T. Steward and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, City Hall, 121 North LaSalle Street, Room 505, Office of the Superintendent of Police. Officer Shea's star was one of fourteen stars added to the newly instituted memorial to preserve the memory of officers killed in the line of duty. The tradition of retiring a star number was born. In 1928, the star case was moved to the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters again moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Blackwell's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman Frank J. Blazek

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
29 Jan 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4901
Incident Date:
28 Apr 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
29 Apr 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 10 - Gresham
Date of Birth:
03 Jun 1898
Served:
2 years, 3 months, 0 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Resurrection Catholic Cemetery - Justice, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 6
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 17
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 47-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Frank J. Blazek, Star #4901, aged 27 years, was a 2 years, 3 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 10 - Gresham.

On April 28, 1926, 11:50 p.m., Officer Blazek had recently dropped his partner, Patrolman John Gorman, off at the station. Officer Gorman was leaving work early after getting permission from their Captain. Blazek stayed on and continued to patrol by himself. While on patrol, he observed a suspicious man walking down the street. After getting a closer look at the man, Officer Blazek realized that the man was Joe Crown, alias "Lovey Joe," who was responsible for more than 35 armed robberies. Crown was also wanted. Officer Blazek stopped his squad car, placed Crown in custody and began to transport him to the station. As Officer Blazek was transporting Crown to the station, he suddenly attacked the officer. The struggle occurred in front of 4913 South State Street where Crown gained control of Blazek’s service weapon and shot him. A witness called police for help and responding officers found Officer Blazek wounded in his squad car upon arrival. Blazek was taken to Washington Park Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries one day later on April 29, 1926.

The witness told investigators that after Crown shot the officer, he beat him over the head, fracturing his skull. Crown then leapt from the automobile and fled on foot. A search of the squad car produced a narcotic vial and hypodermic needle in the rear seat, which was believed to be Crown’s.

On May 11, 1926, Crown was arrested. On May 14, 1926, he was held by the Coroner to the Grand Jury after confessing to the murder and 35 robberies. On October 1, 1926, he was sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Eller.

Officer Blazek was laid to rest in Resurrection Catholic Cemetery, 7201 Archer Avenue, Justice, Illinois.

Patrolman Frank J. Blazek, born June 3, 1898, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 29, 1924.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7618.

Patrolman John L. V. Blomberg

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
Apr 1892
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
922
Incident Date:
07 Nov 1895
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Train
Age:
38
End of Watch:
07 Nov 1895
Unit of Assignment:
District 5, 14th Precinct - Kensington
Date of Birth:
1857
Served:
3 years, 7 months*
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # A-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 6
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 27
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-W: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman John L. V. Blomberg, Star #922, aged 38 years, was a 3 year, 7 month veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 5, 14th Precinct - Kensington.

On November 7, 1895, at 3:00 p.m., Officer Blomberg, was on duty at the Pullman Crossing of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, located at 111th Street and Cottage Grove Avenue. Officer Blomberg was directing passengers disembarking from a southbound train. While standing on the northbound track, he did not see engine 215 as it approached the station. Not recognizing the perilous position he was in until it was to late, the train struck him before he could move out of its way. He died a short time later from the injuries he sustained.

Officer Blomberg was laid to rest in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Officer John L. V. Blomberg, born in 1857, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in April, 1892.

Officer Blomberg was survived by his wife and three children.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Detective John Joseph Blyth II

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Sep 1941
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1395
Incident Date:
16 Jun 1956
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
31
End of Watch:
16 Jun 1956
Unit of Assignment:
18th District - Stock Yards
Date of Birth:
20 Dec 1914
Served:
14 years, 9 months, 3 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 6
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 1
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 33-E: 2

Incident Details:

Detective John Joseph Blyth, II, Star #1395, aged 31 years, was a 14 year, 9 month, 3 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 18th District - Stock Yards.

On June 16, 1956, Deacon Charles Leggett, age 49, and Head Usher Thomas J. Sylvester, age 23, were painting the interior of the New Mount Baptist Church located at 223 West 47th Street and heard Loretta Green, age 16, scream in the alley. Jessie Welch, alias James Dukes, age 31 of 4358 South Shields Avenue, Green's boyfriend, was beating her. The men investigated and were shot by Welch. Three people were wounded in the shooting affray; Deacon Leggett was shot twice in the right leg, Head Usher Sylvester was shot once in the chest and Ross was believed shot when Detective Blyth exchanged shots with Welch. Leggett and Sylvester were taken to Provident Hospital.

While talking with a fireman in the 4600 block of South Wentworth Avenue Detective Blyth and his partner, Detective Daniel Rolewicz, heard shots fired. Directing their attention to 47th and Wells Street they observed Welch dart out of a group of people. They proceeded there and found that the shots had come from an alley just north of 4715 South Wells Street. Officer Rolewicz called for Welch to halt at the mouth of the shadowy alley. Instead of obeying, Welch turned, fired several shots and then fled on foot. Detective Blyth was struck in the chest and as he collapsed to the ground was able to return fire striking Welch. Detective Blyth was transported to Evangelical Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Jessie Welch was captured a few minutes later by Patrolmen Ray Leddin and Lawrence Commer, who followed a trail of blood from wounds that may have been inflicted by the bullets Detective Blyth fired as he went down. Shot three times in the chest, he was found hiding under a station wagon parked in the lot at 4802 South Wentworth Avenue with a .32 caliber pistol in his hand. On June 27, Welch pleaded not guilty before Chief justice Cornelius J. Harrington in Criminal Court. Jessie Welch, pleaded guilty to two charges of Assault to Murder in the wounding of two other men just prior to the fatal shooting of Detective Blyth. On August 15, 1956, James Dukes was found guilty and sentenced to death. On August 24, 1962, he was executed at Cook County Jail, becoming the last man to be executed there. Blyth's partner was present and witnessed the execution. Loretta Green was also arrested and charged with carrying Welch's gun prior to the argument which led to Detective Blyth's death. Green was committed to the custody of the Illinois Youth Commission by Judge Harold P. O'Connell.

Detective Blyth was waked at McPhee Funeral Home located at 7133 South Western Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Adrian's Church located at 7000 South Fairfield Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 19, 1956 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Detective John Joseph Blyth, II, born December 20, 1914, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 13, 1939. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. Detective Blyth was attached to the Scotland Yard special investigations unit until he was transferred to the Stock Yards station several years ago. He often spent his off duty hours chasing down criminals and in 1951 he was commended for his part in solving 229 crimes. His death ended 87 years of service by three generations of his family on the Chicago Police Department. His father, retired at the time years, was a policeman for 30 years and Blyth wore his star, No. 1395, which has since been retired. Detective Blyth's maternal grandfather was also a policeman for 40 years.

Detective Blyth was a member of the Chicago Patrolmen's Club, Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association, Holy Name Society, Illinois Police Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Margaret (nee Martin), age 40; children: John Joseph, III, age 18; Mary Ann, age 17; Norrine, age 11 and William, age 15; parents: John Joseph, I (CPD) and Mary B. O’Mahoney and siblings: Donald J., Robert P., Rosemary J., Virginia M. and the late Elleen.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide record, File #5406.

On December 31, 1957, Detective Blyth's star was retired by Commissioner Timothy J. O'Connor and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the 4th floor Office of the Superintendent at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. The Honored Star Case was later relocated to the lobby of Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Detective Blyth's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

In June 1962, the police department honored Officer Blyth's memory by naming the brand new M-4 police boat in the Department's Marine Unit after him.

Patrolman Stanley Leo Bobosky

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
10 Feb 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1446
Incident Date:
06 Jul 1934
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
40
End of Watch:
06 Jul 1934
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
12 May 1894
Served:
12 years, 4 months, 26 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 6
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 37
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 17-W: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman Stanley Leo Bobosky, Star #1446, aged 40 years, was a 12 year, 4 month, 26 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division, detailed to the State Attorney's Special Detail on Automobile Thievery headquartered at the Warren Avenue Station.

On July 6, 1934, at approximately 12:25 a.m., Officer Bobosky and his partner, Patrolman Richard Zimmerman, were in uniform and working a special assignment to combat auto thefts. Auto thefts, at the time, had become an urban issue reaching all-time highs. While on patrol the officers spotted a V-8 Ford sedan, which was missing its license plates, with three youths inside. At Lake Street and Western Avenue, the officers came to a stop at a red light. While stopped under the elevated tracks Officer Babosky exited the squad car and approached the youth’s vehicle. He asked “Who owns this car?” placing one of his feet on the running board of the car. Just as he placed his foot on the running board, the driver drew a revolver and shot Bobosky in the abdomen. The bandits then made good their escape. Officer Zimmerman rushed his partner to Washington Boulevard Hospital at 12:30 a.m. Upon arrival, doctors determined the bullet had passed through his left side and exited the right side causing a mortal wound. Officer Bobosky succumbed to his wounds three hours later at 3:30 a.m. All three suspects remain unidentified.

Officer Bobosky was laid to rest on July 9, 1934 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Patrolman Stanley Leo Bobosky, born May, 12 1894, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 10, 1922.

Officer Bobosky served in the United States Navy from May 8, 1918 through February 23, 1919, was a veteran of World War II and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Seaman 2nd Class. He was survived by his wife, Madeline and children: Dorothy, age 4 and Robert, age 10.

Patrolman William S. Bodnar Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Dec 1968
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
14642
Incident Date:
08 Apr 1974
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile (Pursuit)
Age:
24
End of Watch:
08 Apr 1974
Unit of Assignment:
1st District - Central
Date of Birth:
10 May 1949
Served:
5 years, 3 months, 15 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 6
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 28
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 23-W: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman William S. Bodnar, Jr., Star #14642, aged 24 years, was a 5 year, 3 month, 15 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st District - Central.

On April 8, 1974, at 5:55 a.m., Patrolmen William S. Bodnar and Thomas A. Wodarczyk were working the first watch on beat 107. While on patrol they initiated a vehicle pursuit of a stolen white 1964 Oldsmobile traveling westbound on Van Buren Street from State Street. For 3 minutes and 20 seconds, beat 107 was reporting on the progress of the pursuit and relaying the license number of the car being pursued. Officer Bodnar was driving as Officer Wodarczyk updated the dispatch center. Suddenly the radio traffic from beat 107 went silent and they were not responding. At 5:43 a.m., another officer called in for emergency equipment to be sent to Van Buren and Morgan Streets. The stolen vehicle had sideswiped a produce truck, driven by Frank Scimica of 1462 West Erie Street, causing it to crash into the beat car and fall on top of it, pinning the officers inside. As a result both officers sustained serious injuries. Officers Bodnar and Wodarczyk were both transported to Illinois Research Hospital where they were pronounced dead on arrival by at 6:09 a.m. on April 8, 1974.

The truck driver, Frank Scimica, was northbound on Morgan Street, proceeding through the green light. His view of the oncoming squad car was partially blocked by an eight-story building on the southeast corner of the intersection. The stolen vehicle was later found abandoned a short distance from the crash and the driver was never apprehended.

Officer Bodnar was waked at Lain & Son Chapel located at 2121 West 95th Street, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady Hungary Catholic Church located at 9237 South Avalon Avenue and he was laid to rest on April 11, 1974 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman William S. Bodnar, Jr., born May 10, 1949, received his Appointment as a Cadet to the Chicago Police Department on December 23, 1968. He received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 14, 1971. Officer Bodnar earned 11 Honorable Mentions during his career.

Officer Bodnar was a member of the Chicago Patrolman's Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Gloria Ann (nee Laninga); children: Wendy Sue, age 5 and William Paul, age 2 and parents Helen Marie (nee Gasik) and William S., Sr. (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #P802615.

On June 27, 2007, Officer Bodnar's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman David L. Boitano

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
15 Sep 1911
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3850
Incident Date:
25 Sep 1924
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
41
End of Watch:
25 Sep 1924
Unit of Assignment:
District 29 - Hudson
Date of Birth:
07 Oct 1882
Served:
13 years, 0 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 11
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 64-E: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman David L. Boitano, Star #3850, aged 41 years, was a 13 year, 0 month, 14 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 29 - Hudson.

On September 25, 1924, at approximately 10:00 p.m., Officer David Boitano told his wife, Charlotte, that he “was going to do a little work on the quiet.” He was off duty and did not start his tour until 12:00 a.m. that night. Officer Boitano had set out that evening intent on tracking down some men who had been involved in some recent Black Hand activities. While “working on the quiet” he went undercover wearing civilian clothes at Elm and Townsend (present day Hudson Avenue) Streets in what was then Little Italy. His beat was in an area colloquially known at the time as “Death Corner.” At 10:25 p.m., he was standing on the corner when an Italian man began running directly toward him carrying an object in his hand. The object was a gun and the man fired five gunshots at Officer Boitano. Officer Boitano was struck and mortally wounded but was able to return fire as he collapsed to the ground. The murderer continued running down the street and made good his escape. Officers from the Hudson Street Station responded to the scene and discovered Officer Boitano’s unconscious body. They put him in a patrol car and rushed him to Henrotin Hospital where he succumbed to his injuries the same day. The Coroner's report attributed the circumstances of Officer Boitano's death as a Black Hand Murder.

After the shooting Detectives and Policemen were sent into the district to search for the killer. A boy, Sam Aiello of 4647 North Robey Street (present day Damen Avenue) was interviewed. He stated, “I heard the shooting and I turned to see Boitano fall. He had his pistol in his hand and fired a shot. The man who shot him ran south on Townsend Street (present day Hudson Avenue). He was tall and dark and looked like an Italian.” Officer Boitano’s wife was also interviewed and she stated that, “He went into that neighborhood looking for a man who lived in Center Street. This man had killed another man named Frank Marotta two weeks ago and my husband was assigned to the case. It may have been Marotta’s slayer who shot my husband.”

Without any solid leads, it was four years before investigators received a tip identifying Officer Boitano’s killer. On June 13, 1928, police responded to a domestic disturbance in which the woman, Frances Trippidi, and a man, Frank Leo of 717 South Ashland Avenue, were arguing about the division of $400.00 she had received in a settlement claim from the Yellow Cab Company. As a result Mrs. Trippidi requested the man be arrested for being too persistent in his demands for a split of the money. The man then made an accusation that Mrs. Trippidi told him in detail how Carlo Aiello killed the policeman. He stated, “Don’t lock me up I’ll tell you who killed Boitano. Frances told me she used to be Carlo Aiello’s sweetie. She was looking out the window at 1146 North Townsend Street (present day Hudson Avenue) the night Boitano got it. She went out after the shooting and picked up Aiello’s cap. He ran away, but later he came back and she took care of him while the police were looking around for him. All that she said to me and it’s true.” Mrs. Trippidi denied the accusations and both were held for questioning while the search for Aiello was launched. Carlo Aiello was a member of the infamous Aiello gang. It was believed that he was indeed the murderer of Officer Boitano, but it is unknown the fate of Aiello or if he was ever arrested for the murder.

Officer Boitano was waked in a chapel located at 4717 North Broadway Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest on September 29, 1924 in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman David L. Boitano, born October 7, 1882, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 15, 1911. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. Officer Boitano had spent 13 years of his career pursuing Black Hand, of the Sicilian Mafia. The Black Hand referred to him as the “Nemesis of Black Handers.”

Officer Boitano was survived by his wife, Charlotte (nee Clifford); parents: Mr. and Mrs. James Boitano and siblings: Alfred, Eva, George, John, Mrs. John Doudero, Mrs. Lawrence Oxx, Mrs. LeRoy Sweet and Mrs. Paul G. Hensel.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7474.

Patrolman Julian A. Bonfield

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Jun 1917
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2310
Incident Date:
15 Dec 1926
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
15 Dec 1926
Unit of Assignment:
District 3 - South Wabash
Date of Birth:
29 Jul 1889
Served:
9 years, 5 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Julian A. Bonfield, Star #2310, aged 37 years, was a 9 year, 5 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 3 - South Wabash.

On December 15, 1926, Two bandits, Elin Lyons and Willie Brown, held up 25 women and four men at the University Extension Conservatory located at 702 East 41st Street. Officer Bonfield was on patrol when he received reports of the robbery and rushed to the scene. He arrived on scene and at 9:10 a.m. encountered the robbers in front of the conservatory. One of the robbers had a fur coat, which he had stolen from one of the women inside, draped over his arm. Unbeknownst to Bonfield, the robber was holding a gun underneath that coat. When Officer Bonfield ordered the men to halt, the robber with the fur coat fired, the bullet ripping through the coat. The bullet struck Officer Bonfield in the neck. When the robbers saw that the officer was wounded, they fled the scene on foot. Officer Bonfield was rushed to Chicago Hospital, dying enroute.

On December 16, 1926, Elin Lyons, a native of Columbia, South America was arrested and positively identified as the murderer. He confessed and implicated a black man, Willie Brown, as his accomplice. On December 22, 1926, Lyons was indicted and was later convicted of Patrolman Bonfield's murder. On June 24, 1927, Lyons was executed by hanging at the Cook County Jail. Willie Brown was never apprehended.

Officer Bonfield was waked at his residence located at 7138 South South Chicago Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at his residence and he was laid to rest on December 18, 1926 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Julian A. Bonfield, born July 29, 1889, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 18, 1917. He was the son of a retired police captain and the nephew of Inspector John Bonfield who commanded police during the Haymarket Riots.

Officer Bonfield was survived by his wife, May; parents: Georgeana and Martin L. and siblings: Agatha Schmidt, Claire Lesser, Harry L. and Marie Stuart.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7652.

Detective Joseph A. Borcia

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
27 Sep 1925
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
7292
Incident Date:
13 Oct 1958
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
52
End of Watch:
13 Oct 1958
Unit of Assignment:
41st District - Rogers Park
Date of Birth:
22 Apr 1906
Served:
33 years, 0 months, 16 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
024 - Rogers Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Detective Joseph A. Borcia, Star #7292, aged 52 years, was a 33 year, 0 month, 16 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 41st District - Rogers Park.

On October 13, 1958, Detective Borcia was standing roll call at the District station when the call of criminal trespass where an armed intruder was breaking into an apartment at 1206 West Jarvis Avenue was reported. Temporary Detective Borcia accompanied Detective Gannon in his personal car and headed eastbound on Touhy Avenue from Clark Street. Detective Curtin and Patrolman Schirmang, also responding to the call, were traveling northbound on Ashland Boulevard. Both cars traveling at a high rate of speed met at the intersection of Touhy Avenue and Ashland Boulevard and collided. The force of the impact threw Detective Gannon's car into a tree where Detective Borcia was pinned inside. All four officers were transported to St. Francis Hospital, in Evanston. Temporary Detective Borcia succumbed to his injuries and the others were treated and released.

Other officers responded to the Jarvis address and the offender was gone on arrival. Per the resident, Miss Solvig Hermanson, age 25, the offender, her boyfriend, had threatened her with a revolver. Shortly after the accident, Alfred Bone, age 30, a University of Chicago student was arrested in his auto at Greenleaf and Western Avenues.

Detective Borcia was waked at Koop Funeral Home located at 5844-48 North Milwaukee Avenue, his Funeral mass was held at St. Tarcissus Church located at 6020 West Ardmore Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 17, 1958 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Detective Joseph A. Borcia, born April 22, 1906, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 27, 1935. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career. On November 16, 1956, Borcia was promoted to Temporary Detective and then dropped from Temporary Detective on November 16, 1957. On July 1, 1958, Borcia was promoted to Detective.

Detective Borcia was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the St. Jude Police League. He was survived by his wife, Marie (nee Marino); daughter, Judith M., age 18; and siblings: Anna Jellen, Frances Coveill, Helen, John, Mary Greco, and Sam.

On November 14, 2006, Detective Borcia's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman William Paul Bosak

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
06 Jun 1966
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3319
Incident Date:
03 Mar 1979
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
03 Mar 1979
Unit of Assignment:
5th District - Kensington
Date of Birth:
20 Mar 1945
Served:
11 years, 8 months, 25 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 34
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-W: 1

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Paul Bosak, Star #3319, aged 33 years, was an 11 year, 8 month, 25 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 5th District - Kensington Tactical Unit.

On December, 13 1978, Kenneth Allen, age 36, of 10200 South St. Lawrence Avenue, had been arrested and his weapons seized through search warrant. Three months later, Allen still seethed with resentment over the incident. Early in the afternoon of March 3, 1979, Allen visited a locksmith and glazier with a curious question. He wanted to know if the glass in Chicago Police cars was bulletproof. The proprietor of the shop, Stanley Evans, told him that only Chicago riot wagons had bulletproof glass.

On March 3, 1979, at 4:15 p.m., Officers Bosak and Van Schaik were working the third watch on beat 561 in plain clothes. The officers had just finished a traffic stop on west 115th and May Streets. During the traffic stop Allen parked his brown 1972 Ford LTD across the street from Officers Bosak and Van Schaik as they were conducting their traffic stop. He lay in wait as he was planning to ambush the officers. As the officers returned to their squad car with their back to him, Allen opened fire on Officer Bosak with a .45 caliber semi-automatic pistol, emptying the magazine. Officer Bosak was hit three times and collapsed to the ground. Allen then drew a second pistol and exited his car to engage Van Schaik, who was on the opposite side of the unmarked police car. Allen engaged him in a gun battle, the two men circling the squad car, both men exhausting their ammunition without scoring a hit. Allen then returned to his car and retrieved a .30 caliber carbine rifle. Meanwhile Officer Van Schaik was able to radio a 10-1 (Officer needs assistance) call for help from the radio in the squad car. Allen then returned and again opened fire on Van Schaik, wounding but not killing the officer. The rifle jammed after two or three shots. While Van Schaik lay wounded on the ground Allen retrieved the .38 caliber service revolver from Officer Bosak. He returned to the front of the car where the wounded Van Schaik lay and executed him with two shots to the face at point blank range.

Allen remained on the scene until two other officers arrived in response to the distress call. He initially fled in his car but quickly returned, attempting to shoot the officers as he drove past. Several more squad cars arrived in pursuit of Allen, still firing from the windows with Officer Bosak's service revolver and a now unjammed carbine. After two collisions with squad cars and one with a CTA bus, Allen was finally stopped when Officer Lawrence Rapien intentionally steered his squad car head on into Allen's car. Allen was taken into custody and the scene was secured. Officer Van Schaik was transported to Roseland Community Hospital by beat 2273 and was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Arya at 4:45 p.m. on March 3, 1979. Officer Bosak was also transported to Roseland Community Hospital by beat 2273 and was pronounced dead by Dr. Arya at 5:00 p.m. on March 3, 1979.

Several guns were confiscated from Allen's car, along with about 250 rounds of ammunition, and a notebook containing the names, addresses, license plate numbers and phone numbers of several police officers and Everette Braden. Braden was the judge who had signed the search warrant authorizing Chicago Police to enter Allen's home.

Kenneth Allen was charged with two counts of murder. He represented himself at his trial and pleaded guilty to the murders of Bosak and Van Schaik. Allen would be convicted of the murders and later sentenced to death. In court Allen stated he had killed the officers for committing “another violation of the people's rights by police“ (i.e. the traffic stop), and because he recognized, mistakenly, Bosak from the standoff at his house on December 13, 1978. Neither officer had been present at that incident. Because of this, and because of evidence, the large amount of ammunition, the notebook, the earlier questioning of the glazier, the jury agreed that he had premeditated the killings.

Kenneth Allen remained under a sentence of death for many years before his sentence was commuted in 2003 in controversial circumstances by the embattled Governor of Illinois, George Ryan. As his last act in office, Ryan commuted the sentences of all 167 convicts on or waiting to be sent to Illinois' Death Row to life in prison. As of 2009 Kenneth Allen remains in Menard Correctional Center.

Officer Bosak was waked at Sheehy Funeral Home located at 10727 South Pulaski Road, his funeral mass was held at St. John Fisher Church located at 10234 South Washtenaw Avenue and he was laid to rest on march 7, 1979 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman William Paul Bosak, born March 20, 1945, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 6, 1966. He earned 135 Honorable mentions During his career.

Officer Bosak served in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve for six years, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged. He was a member of the Confederation of Police, Illinois Police Association and the St. Jude Police League. Officer Bosak was survived by his wife, Imogene (nee Brown); children: Jean Marie, age 6 and Paula Christine, age 8; mother, Stephanie (nee Kocolowski) and brother, Robert (CFD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #A075329.

In March 1979, Officer Bosak's star was retired by Superintendent James E. O'Grady and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Bosak's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

ALLEN'S BACKGROUND:

Kenneth Allen, born October 17, 1942, is the convicted murderer of Chicago Police Officers William Bosak and Roger Van Schaik. He is currently serving life in prison without parole in Illinois.

Earlier confrontations with police:

On both December 10th and 13th, 1978, Chicago Police were contacted by Allen's common-law wife, Bianca Smith, who complained of having “problems“ with Allen, and that he was heavily armed. Officers were both times dispatched to Allen and Smith's residence to deal with the domestic complaints. The second time, Allen was refusing Smith entry to their shared residence, and demonstrated his willingness to continue to do so by brandishing various firearms at police from his front doorstep and telling the officers “the next fucking pig that puts his foot on my property, I'm going to blow his head off“ and “you motherfuckers are all going to pay for this.“

Eventually, after a 19 hour standoff and in front of several Chicago TV crews, Allen surrendered to the police without a shot being fired. While Allen was incarcerated pending bail for this incident, Judge Everette Braden issued a search warrant for Allen's home. It was executed later that day, while Allen was still in jail, whereupon officers retrieved the following firearms:

  • one Colt .45 semiautomatic pistol,
  • one Smith & Wesson revolver, model 27,
  • one Smith & Wesson revolver, model 57 (highly similar or identical to the S&W Model 29),
  • one Colt .357 Python revolver,
  • one.44 Ruger Super Blackhawk revolver,
  • one Winslow 7mm rifle,
  • one Weatherby 12-gauge shotgun,
  • and over a thousand rounds of various kinds of ammunition.

Officers on the scene of the standoff claimed to have seen Allen at times bearing a gun that appeared to be an M16 rifle, however no such gun was recovered by the officers executing the search warrant. Upon returning home from jail, Allen was furious that his guns had been confiscated. He contacted lawyer Kermit Coleman to sue for their return, but was informed it was unlikely he would ever get them back from the police.

Patrolman Charles A. Brady

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
24 Oct 1942
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6795
Incident Date:
02 Sep 1945
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
35
End of Watch:
03 Sep 1945
Unit of Assignment:
41st District - Rogers Park
Date of Birth:
04 Nov 1909
Served:
2 years, 11 months, 10 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
024 - Rogers Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 44
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Charles A. Brady, Star #6795, aged 35 years, was a 2 year, 11 month, 10 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 41st District - Rogers Park.

On September 2, 1945, at 11:10 p.m., Officer Brady and his partner, George H. Helstern, working in plainclothes were en route to their beat. They observed a suspicious male near a currency exchange on Lunt Avenue and Clark Street. Knowing the suspect didn’t belong in the area the two officers crossed the street and positioned themselves out of sight. Watching the man for a moment, the officers then approached the subject and announced they were police officers. The offender, Cecil “Red” Smith immediately opened fire, mortally wounding both officers. Both officers returned fire, expending half dozen rounds, as they fell to the ground. Officer Helstern was shot in the cheek and chest and died almost immediately. Officer Brady was struck in the back but didn’t lose consciousness. As he lay on the ground he recognized a local civilian named Paul McMahon. Brady gave McMahon his service revolver and told him to do his best to the criminal. McMahon fired once at Smith as he made good his escape down a nearby alley.

A few minutes later a 41st District squad car driven by Patrolmen Arthur Ackman and George Heckenbech was driving to the station at 7075 North Clark Street. The officers observed a small crowd milling around the corner of Lunt Avenue and Clark Street and stopped to investigate. They quickly discovered Officer Brady lying face down on the sidewalk with his service revolver and spent cartridges scattered about nearby. The officers loaded Brady into their squad car to transport him to the hospital, when a witness informed them that there was another officer injured nearby. The officers ran to investigate and located Officer Helstern about 75 feet south of the corner. Both Officer Brady and Helstern were transported by patrol wagon to St. Francis Hospital in Evanston. Officer Helstern was pronounced dead on arrival. Officer Brady succumbed to his injuries three and a half hours after the shooting at 2:40 a.m. on September 3, 1945.

Following the shooting, police squads all over the city were put on alert to hunt down the killer. Several witnesses gave differing descriptions of the shooter. Detectives turned to Officer Brady for clarity as he lay in the hospital fighting for his life. Brady did his best to provide a description of the killer despite receiving multiple blood transfusions. He described the killer as a dirty-faced young man wearing a slouch hat, blue shirt, dark pants and a black rubber glove on his left hand. That led detectives to believe the killer had a prosthetic limb.

Cecil Smith was eventually apprehended and charged with two counts of murder. While awaiting trial he met a different justice. In December, 1945, Cecil Smith was shot and killed by members of his own gang in fear that he would turn in other gang members.

Officer Brady was waked at Maloney Funeral Home located at 1359 West Devon Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Ignatius Church located at 6559 North Glenwood Avenue and he was laid to rest on September 7, 1945 in All Saints Catholic Cemetery, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Patrolman Charles A. Brady, born November 4, 1909, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 24, 1942. Prior to joining the Chicago Police Department Officer Brady was a Loyola University football player and then a Cook County Highway Deputy Sheriff.

Officer Brady was survived by his wife, Bernice (nee Crawley), age 34; children: Anthony, Benedict, age 11, Bernice, age 10, Charles, age 13, Delia, 7 months old, James, age 5, Loretta, age 3, Mary Elizabeth, Melissa, age 8, Michael, age 6 and Susan, age 2; parents: Elizabeth (nee Dodson) and Ignatius and siblings: Gene, Elizabeth, Francis Powers, Mary Rita, Virginia Baldwin and the late Loretta.