LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

Checkerboard Band

Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman Roman C. Steinke

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Sep 1941
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4706
Incident Date:
06 Feb 1954
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
42
End of Watch:
13 Feb 1954
Unit of Assignment:
32nd District - Shakespeare
Date of Birth:
05 Sep 1911
Served:
12 years, 5 months, 0 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
014 - Shakespeare

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-2
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 36-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Roman C. Steinke, Star #4706, aged 42 years, was a 12 year, 5 month, 0 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 32nd District - Shakespeare.

On February 6, 1954, Officer Steinke and his partner, Patrolman Jeremiah C. Lucey, attempted to serve an arrest warrant for assault with a deadly weapon on James Lee-Fong, owner of a Chinese laundry at 2705 West Diversey Parkway. Officers Lucey and Steinke entered the laundry with Stephen Malenk, Sr., age 40, who pointed out Lee-Fong, who was alone, as the man who had assaulted him. After being identified, Lee-Fong admitted to slapping the boy. Officer Lucey stated to Lee-Fong "I have warrants for your arrest; you'll have to come to the station." Lee asked permission to get his hat and coat in a rear room. Lee-Fong re-appeared a moment later and opened fire with a .38 caliber rifle. Shooting at both the officers and the Malenks, Lee-Fong continued to fire. Mr. Malenks, Sr. was struck first in the chest and upper arm. Officer Lucey was struck in the chest and Officer Steinke struck in several place including his wrist. The officers returned fire and Steinke was able to strike Lee-Fong in the head wounding him. Lee-Fong then fled to the back of the shop. At this time the officers and Malenks exited the shop to the sidewalk in front. Captain Thomas McLaughlin of the Shakespeare station, Supervising Captain Robert E. Ryan and several police squads responded to the laundry a few minutes later.

As the responding officers began arriving on scene they were able to get the wounded medical attention. While Lee-Fong was in the back of the shop he obtained another weapon, a .16 gauge shotgun, and began to shoot at the responding officers as they entered the shop. By this time Lee-Fong had barricaded himself in the laundry and held the 150 responding policemen at bay for 30 minutes. Detectives fired several shots into the store and then surrounded it. When the firing from Lee-Fong stopped, Detectives Edward Cagney and Joseph Corcoran battered down a back door and overpowered Lee as he lay on the floor reaching for a revolver.

Officer Steinkie would later give this account, "when he opened fire, I was knocked down. I crawled out the door and then fired three shots at the gunman. Then I passed out on the sidewalk." Officer Lucey had staggered into a grocery next door and collapsed. Malenk ran to a home of a neighbor in the building in which he lived and called police.

Officer Lucey was shot through the liver and died the following day on February 7, 1954 at Alexian Brothers Hospital. Officer Steinke was shot five times: in each hand, neck, right shoulder and abdomen. He succumbed to his wounds at 5:55 a.m. seven days later on February 13, 1954 at St. Elizabeth Hospital. Mr. Malenk, Sr. was shot in the chest and right upper arm; he later recovered at Augustina Hospital. Lee was shot two times in the head and died from his wounds April 27, 1954 at Cook County Hospital.

Police were unable to question Lee-Fong at the time of the shooting because of his wounds, but he would later claim that he did not know Steinke and Lucey were police officers but instead thought the plain clothes officers had come into his shop to beat him. The course of events began on February 3, 1954 when Mr. Malenk, Sr. said, "Lee-Fong slapped his son Stephen Malenk, Jr., age 11, in the face after chasing him and another boy for peering thru his store window." Lee-Fong also clubbed Malenk, Sr. with a metal pipe, breaking his left arm, and broke two windows in his automobile when he went back to the store with his son to complain. It was at that point Mr. Malenk alerted police and sought a warrant against Lee-Fong at the Shakespeare Avenue court.

Officer Steinke was waked at Lain & Son Funeral Home located at 5501 North Ashland Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Edwards Church located at 4350 West Sunnyside Avenue and he was laid to rest on February 16, 1954 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Patrolman Roman C. Steinke, born September 5, 1911, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 13, 1941.

Officer Steinke was survived by his wife, Dorothy; children: Michael and Patrick and siblings: Dora and George.

Detective Charles W. Stine

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
05 Feb 1915
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
28 Sep 1936
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
71
End of Watch:
21 Apr 1952
Unit of Assignment:
1st District - Central
Date of Birth:
01 Apr 1881
Served:
23 years, 1 month, 27 days*
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 4
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Detective Charles W. Stine, Star # Unknown, aged 71 years, was a retired 23 year, 1 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, from the 1st District - Central.

On September 28, 1936, Officer Charles Stine and his friend, Detective Connelly, age 26, were off duty and in civilian clothing at Rehling's Tavern at 203 East 69th Street. Two parolees, Norman Cravens, age 21 and Clarence Lukesch, age 21 entered the tavern, drew their pistols and announced a robbery. A third offender, Fred Meyers, age 20, waited outside in a stolen getaway car. As the two men announced the robbery, Detectives' Connelly and Stine drew their weapons and a gun battle ensued. A third, Retired disabled Policeman, Charles Colgrove, age 53, was also on scene and used his cane to fell Lukesch. In all 25 shots were fired. Detective Connelly was shot four times and transported to St. Bernard's Hospital in serious condition. Detective Stine was shot just below the heart and was also transported to St. Bernard's Hospital reportedly near death. Louis Halberg, age 60, a porter in the tavern, was shot twice but not seriously hurt. One of the gunman, Norman Cravens, was shot dead while Lukesch was captured unharmed by a responding officer, Detective Timothy O'Connor. The third offender, Fred Meyers, fled the scene in the getaway car once the shooting started. He was arrested later at his residence.

Further investigation revealed that the group of three was paroled from Pontiac Reformatory on February 14, 1962. They had robbed 50 small businesses since being paroled. Arrest records showed that Meyer and Lukesch were sentenced to one year to life imprisonment on March 21, 1934 after they pleaded guilty to robbing the store of Sam Fiengeruth located at 2339 West Howard Street. Both were paroled after serving less than two years of their sentence. In 1934 the two were indicted on five counts of robbery, two counts of burglary and one count of larceny. Ironically, parole board records indicated that the two “had no previous criminal records.“ Norman Cravens was also paroled to Danville, Illinois after serving four years for a different crime. He left Danville in violation of his parole to commit the robbery.

Lukesch and Meyers stood trial and were convicted. On November 10, 1936, they were sentenced to life in prison as habitual criminals by Chief Justice Michael McKinley. In addition to their sentence they were classified as parole violators and ordered to serve out their original sentences too.

Detective Stine survived the shooting but never fully recovered from the shooting and suffered from extreme pain and chronic nephritis. Due to his medical issues, officer Stine went on the disability pension roll on December 10, 1937, he later resigned from the Department on April 1, 1938. These medical complications all led to Stine's early death on April 21, 1952.

Detective Connelly retired from the Department in January, 1962, serving 28 years, after being placed on the pension disability roll shortly after the shooting. He never fully recovered from the shooting and suffered extreme pain, rheumatoid arthritis, developed cancer and chronic lead poisoning from the two bullets that were left in his body. According to Dr. Nancy Jones, retired Chief Medical Examiner of Cook County, those complications all led to Detective Connelly's early death on October 9, 1962.

Detective Stine was laid to rest on April 25, 1952 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois. His grave is located in Grave S, Lot 512, Block 48.

Detective Charles W. Stine, born April 1, 1881, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 5, 1915. He earned 6 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $180.00.

Sergeant Alane Marie Stoffregen

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
27 Feb 1978
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1203
Incident Date:
02 Jun 2000
Cause of Death:
Drowned
Age:
50
End of Watch:
02 Jun 2000
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 059 - Marine Unit
Date of Birth:
25 Jun 1949
Served:
22 years, 3 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Evergreen Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 29
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 47-W: 22

Incident Details:

Sergeant Alane Marie Stoffregen, Star #1203, aged 50 years, was a 22 year, 3 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division, Special Functions Group: Unit 059 - Marine Unit.

On June 2, 2000, at 12:30 p.m., Sergeant Stoffregen a Master Diver, was participating in a “search-and-rescue“ training exercise about one mile off of Navy Pier on Lake Michigan. Sergeant Stoffregen had completed a 35 minute diving practice session and signaled to her diving partner that she was going to return to the surface. When she reached the water's surface she was met by crushing, two to three foot waves. As she reached the Chicago Marine boat, she yelled for the diver on board the boat. Sergeant Stoffregen may have been struggling in the water prior to his arrival. The onboard diver later stated that he did not know she was there until she yelled his name. Sergeant Stoffregen's efforts and those of the officer on board were impeded by the crushing waves. A second Marine Unit boat responded and assisted in her rescue. The officers immediately rushed her to a waiting ambulance. She was transported to Northwestern Memorial Hospital by CFD Ambulance #53 where she was pronounced dead by Dr. Kontrick at 1:20 p.m. on June 2, 2000. Doctors concluded that panic, fatigue, and exhaustion attributed to Sergeant Stoffregen's accidental drowning at the surface. Dr. James Caruso of the U.S. Navy hospital in Pensacola, Florida, reviewed the case and agreed she accidentally drowned at the surface, probably because of exhaustion. Dr. Peter Bennett, a Duke University professor and president of the Divers Alert Network, said divers over age 40 are most prone to surface drowning. Dr. Bennett also said a common cause of surface drowning is heart trouble triggered by the change in surface temperature on a diver's face.

Sergeant Stoffregen was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4727 West 103rd Street, Oak Lawn, Illinois, her funeral mass was held on June 7, 2000 at St. Nicholas of Tolentine Catholic Church located at 3721 West 62nd Street, and was cremated on June 7, 2000 at Evergreen Cemetery, 3401 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Sergeant Alane Marie Stoffregen, born June 25, 1949, received her Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 27, 1978. She earned 47 Honorable Mentions, 4 Complimentary Letters and 1 Physical Fitness Award during her career. In 1998, she was promoted to Detective. In June, 1999, she was promoted to Sergeant.

Sergeant Stoffregen was a member of the Policemen's Benevolent and Protective Association. She was survived by her mother, Agnes (nee Mihalovich), age 77 and siblings: Gale, James, Kenneth, Marybeth Murphy, Ronald and Timothy.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #F328600.

On May 24, 2005, Sergeant Stoffregan's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Alfred M. Stokke

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
18 Sep 1917
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2571
Incident Date:
24 Jan 1935
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
48
End of Watch:
24 Jan 1935
Unit of Assignment:
38th District - Town Hall
Date of Birth:
11 May 1886
Served:
17 years, 4 months, 6 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
019 - Town Hall

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 38
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 29-E: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman Alfred M. Stokke, Star #2571, aged 48 years, was a 17 year, 4 month, 6 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 38th District - Town Hall.

On January 24, 1935, just before 5:00 p.m., Officer Stokke was assigned to the surveillance of the Meisel Tire Company store located at 4465 North Broadway Avenue. The Chicago Police Department had received a tip that an armed robbery was going to take place there. Keeping watch from a back room, Patrolman Stokke observed a car, occupied by three men, pulled up in front of the store. Three armed offenders, Eugene Wrobleski, age 21, Alex Goralski, age 23 and Anthony Adams, age 24, entered the store and announced a robbery. They robbed the shop’s owner, Carl Adams and a customer, Frank Smith taking $50.00 from the register. When the gunmen ordered the two men to the backroom of the store, Patrolman Stokke surprised them and a gun battle ensued. Tragically, Patrolman Stokke was hit in the head, and groin. The gunman then fled the scene making good their escape. Officer Stokke was transported to Lakeview Hospital where he received a blood transfusion. He succumbed to his injuries at 11:05 p.m. with his two children by his bedside. Before he passed, Patrolman Stokke reported to Captain Patrick O'Connell that he believed he had wounded two of the gunmen.

On September 3, 1935, Anthony Adams, Alex Goralski, and Eugene Wrobleski were arrested and confessed to the murder of Patrolman Stokke. On October 8, 1936, all three men were found guilty and were each sentenced to 75 years in prison.

Officer Stokke in a chapel located at 2114 West Irving Park Road, his funeral mass was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest on January 28, 1935 in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Alfred M. Stokke, born May 11, 1886, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 18, 1917. He earned 1 Credible Mention and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $120.00 during his career.

Officer Stokke was survived by his wife, Josephine (nee Grantham) and children: Ernestine and Frank.

Patrolman Mitchell A. Stone

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Aug 1955
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4030
Incident Date:
29 Apr 1959
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
29 Apr 1959
Unit of Assignment:
1st District - Central
Date of Birth:
24 Dec 1921
Served:
3 years, 8 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
001 - Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 6
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 13-W: 9

Incident Details:

Patrolman Mitchell A. Stone, Star #4030, aged 37 years, was a 3 year, 8 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 1st District - Central.

On April 29, 1959, at 4:38 a.m., Officer Stone, while working as a relief patrolman, and his partner, Patrolman Gerald Marzillo, were working the 1st watch on car #115. The officers were on patrol and stopped at a red light at Roosevelt Road and Wabash Avenue when they were approached by a female citizen. She advised them that, William Witherspoon, age 36, of 4550 West Maypole Avenue, a man she had been on a date with, was carrying a gun. She stated that the man had just walked into a parking lot behind a gas station located on the southeast corner Roosevelt Road and Wabash Avenue. The officers looked in the direction the women had mentioned and observed Witherspoon walking into the parking lot behind the gas station. Officer Marzillo, driver, made a u-turn into the gas station and parked. The officers exited the squad car and walked into the parking lot to look for Witherspoon. After a short search Officer Stone called out to his partner and said he observed Witherspoon. Officer Stone told his partner to get the car and drive to Michigan Avenue and block the other end of the lot as to prevent Witherspoon's escape. Officer Marzillo drove to Roosevelt Road and Michigan Avenue while Officer Stone pursued Witherspoon on foot. Upon arrival at Roosevelt Road and Wabash Avenue Officer Marzillo failed to see either of the two. He continued to drive south on Michigan Avenue for a short distance when he hard the sound of gunfire. Officer Stone had chased Witherspoon to a empty parking lot located at 1241 South Michigan Avenue. He confronted Witherspoon and he drew a 9 mm semi-automatic firearm and fired one time from about two feet away. Officer Stone returned fire, shooting five times, as Witherspoon fled on foot. After hearing the gunfire Officer Marzillo heard groans coming from the empty parking lot.

Officer Marzillo radioed in a call for help and went to investigate the groans. Officer Stone was found approximately 20 feet from the south wall of 1239 South Michigan Avenue and 45 feet from the east sidewalk of Michigan Avenue lying on the ground. Just after the shooting, Patrolmen Cahey and Donlevy, car #144, were at Roosevelt Road and Wabash Avenue when they were flagged down by a taxi driver, Lee Schultz, of 1258 South Michigan Avenue. The taxi driver informed them that the man who had just shot the officer was now in a gas station as 11th Street and Wabash Avenue. The officer immediately proceeded to the gas station and interviewed the attendant. The attendant told the officers that a man matching their description just went into the washroom. Witherspoon was found hiding in the bathroom by the officers. After removing Witherspoon from the bathroom a search was conducted. A 9 mm semi-automatic firearm, loaded with five live cartridges, was recovered from the flush tank of the toilet. Officer Stone sustained a three gunshot wounds to his stomach and was transported to St. Luke Hospital by Squadrol #251. Car #144 transported Witherspoon to St. Luke Hospital where Officer Stone identified him as the shooter and Officer Marzillo as then man they were chasing. Officer Stone succumbed to his injuries shortly after identifying Witherspoon and was pronounced by Dr. J. Baker at 5:10 a.m. on April 29, 1959.

During interrogation Witherspoon related that he was drinking in the Knickerbocker bar located at 1231 South Wabash Avenue where he and his friend Frank Dydra, met a girl named “Betty.“ He propositioned Betty to have sexual intercourse and gave her $50.00. The three then left the Bar and went to the Scotch Plaid Restaurant located at 1220 South Wabash Avenue where they had a sandwich. After leaving the restaurant Witherspoon and “Betty“ walked to 12th Street and Wabash Avenue where she refused to have intercourse with Witherspoon. Witherspoon demanded she give him his $50.00 back, she refused, and an argument ensued. It was at this time she saw a squad car stopped at a red light and began to walk over to it. When Witherspoon saw “Betty“ talking to the policemen, he walked behind the gas station and hid behind a trailer parked in the lot. Witherspoon then saw the policemen's flashlight and fled on foot diagonally across Michigan Avenue and hid in another two wheel trailer. He told detectives that he was only in there for a short time when the policeman's flashlight beam was upon him. He saw the policeman standing there with his gun out and In fear of being arrested he fired one shot at the policeman and fled on foot. Witherspoon then ran to his car which was parked in the gas station lot at 11th Street and Wabash Avenue.

Witherspoon, was an ex-convict who served time in prison in Jackson, Michigan for larceny and auto theft. He was also wanted by the FBI for larceny, forgery, and burglary. He was described by police as tall, slim, toothless and arrogant. When caught, Witherspoon admitted to shooting the policeman and said “I was hot, wanted by the FBI and Detroit police, and couldn't stand a pinch.“ Witherspoon also provided police with information that led to the arrest of his accomplice, Frank Dydra, age 39, and the recovery of a cache of diamonds valued at $7,000, which they had buried under gravel in the parking lot. It was later learned that both men were also wanted for several armed robberies in suburban Detroit, Michigan. The woman known as “Betty“ was later identified as Helen Murray, age 31, of 507 West 47th Street.

On April 29, 1959, Frank Dydra was arrested by officers of the 25th District. On April 30, 1959, Witherspoon and Dydra were held to a Coroner's Inquest. Both men plead the 5th and were ordered held over to the Grand Jury by a Coroner's Jury. On May 13, 1958, the Grand Jury returned a True Bill was returned for murder on Witherspoon and accessory to murder for Dydra. On April 20, 1960, Witherspoon was tried by jury in Judge Leslie Salter's courtroom on the charge of murder. On April 23, 1960, The jury returned a verdict of guilty and recommended the death penalty. The court agreed to abide by the jury's decision. It is unknown the fate of Frank Dydra.

Officer Stone was waked at Kowachek Funeral Home located at 5776 West Lawrence Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Tarcissus Church located at 6020 West Ardmore Avenue and he was laid to rest on May 2, 1959 in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Patrolman Mitchell A. Stone, born December 24, 1921, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 22, 1955. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Stone served in the U.S. Army Air Corps for six years, was a veteran of World War II and was Honorably Discharged as a tail gunner. He was survived by his wife, Ethel; children: Bradley, age 3 and an unborn child, Michael; parents: Louise (nee Ptasinski) and Casimir Kaminski and brother, Julian C. Kaminski, age 40. Officer Mitchell Stone had changed his name from Michael Kaminski. Ms. Stone gave birth to a 7 pound boy at St. Anne's Hospital, about four hours after the burial of her husband. Her labor pains began during the funeral mass and she was rushed to the hospital just after mass ended.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department Central Complaint Room No. 36615 and Station Complaint No. 617621. Incident disseminated via Teletype Message No. 25776 and 257789

Patrolman Walter James Storm

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
16 Aug 1935
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
6891
Incident Date:
05 Jul 1942
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
05 Jul 1942
Unit of Assignment:
28th District - Austin
Date of Birth:
15 Jan 1908
Served:
6 years, 10 months, 19 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
025 - Grand Central

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olive Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 43
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 29-E: 2

Incident Details:

Patrolman Walter James Storm, Star #6891, aged 34 years, was a 6 year, 10 month, 19 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 28th District - Austin.

On July 5, 1942, at 12:15 a.m., Officer Storm had just finished his tour of duty and changed into his civilian clothes. He then went to visit a good friend, Fred Goss, who was a bartender at a tavern located at 5141-43 West North Avenue. Prior to Officer Storm’s arrival, four bandits, Nick Gianos, Eugene Guzy, Anthony Moskal, and Leo Piscopo entered the tavern and announce a holdup while Sharlene O’Neill waited in the getaway car. The bandits had moved the bartender and two patrons against a wall and were searching them for valuables. Two of the gunman broke off and went into the adjoining liquor store to rob the clerk, Mrs. Rose Martin of $9.50. Guzy began to beat the bartender striking him in the head at least five times with the butt of his gun. He then pushed Goss into the corner taking $20.00 from his wallet. Guzy then went to the register and removed $60.00 from the drawer just as Officer Storm walked into the tavern.

Officer Storm entered the establishment and unknowingly interrupted a robbery in progress. As he walked into the tavern, his friend, Fred Goss warned him that there was a stick-up. Goss shouted “Look out Walter, it’s a stick-up.” Officer Storm immediately drew his weapon and fired at Guzy emptying his revolver. Guzy returned fire striking Officer Storm in the head and shoulder before he collapsed to the floor and died from his gunshot wounds. Guzy’s accomplishes fled the scene without firing any shots fleeing in the awaiting getaway car. Officer Storm was taken to St. Anne’s Hospital where he died just as the ambulance arrived.

Officer Storm was taken to St. Anne's Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds the same day. The other three gunmen fled the scene but were eventually arrested.

Further investigation revealed that Officer Storm had spent the evening before the incident searching local taverns for the very bandits who had killed him. Storm’s partner, detective Edward Capparelli, related that they had combed local taverns hopping to find the gang of robbers. They had received a tip that the bandits would rob another tavern that night. Eugene Guzy was identified at the scene from a parole card found on his body. He had a long record going back to December 29, 1931. He was convicted on a weapons charge and sent to the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet on November age 25, 1935. On March 29, 1940 he was released from prison on parole. His death led to the identification of his accomplices which were all apprehended. Nick Gianos, Anthony Moskal, and Leo Piscopo stood trial and were found guilty. On November 5, 1942, all three were sentenced to 35 years each in Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. Sharlene O’Neill also stood trial and was convicted. On November 9, 1942, she was sentenced to 2 years in the Dwight Reformatory for Women.

Officer Walter was laid to rest on July 8, 1942 in Mount Olive Cemetery, 3800 North Narragansett Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Walter James Storm, born January 15, 1908, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 16, 1935. He earned 2 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $120.00 during his career.

Officer Storm was survived by his wife, Helene.

Patrolman William H. Stringfellow

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Nov 1914
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2272
Incident Date:
03 Oct 1935
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
52
End of Watch:
03 Oct 1935
Unit of Assignment:
Traffic Division
Date of Birth:
27 Jun 1883
Served:
20 years, 10 months, 20 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Acacia Park Cemetery - Norridge, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 38
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 45-E: 4

Incident Details:

Patrolman William H. Stringfellow, Star #2272, aged 52 years, was a 20 year, 10 month, 20 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Traffic Division.

On October 3, 1935, at 11:17 a.m., Officer Stringfellow was escorting John Beahan, a cashier for the Fred Harvey Restaurant located in Union Station at 500 West Jackson Boulevard, to the nearby Mercantile Trust and Savings Bank at 541 West Jackson Boulevard. Leaving the businesses basement offices, the two encountered the offender ten feet from the main floor ramp leading out to Clinton Street, just north of Jackson Boulevard. Beahan was carrying approximately $3,700.00 to $5,300.00 in a satchel when they were ambushed in a daylight armed robbery. The offender was first observed by Beahan pretending to tie his shoe. Beahan was only a few steps behind Officer Stringfellow when the offender stood up and fired several shots at Officer Stingfellow. The officer had no time to draw his weapon and was struck two times, falling to the floor fatally wounded. Beahan, startled by the gunfire, also fell to the floor hitting his head and dropping the satchel. The offender grabbed the satchel and ran to Clinton Street, where he was joined by three accomplices. The four bandits jumped into a nearby sedan and made good their escape.

Customers inside the station rushed to the scene. One Dr. Walter Aye of Pennsylvania was one of them, who pronounced Officer Stringfellow dead at the scene. Beahan was not shot during the incident.

Detectives believed that the bandits were part of a gang that attempted to rob the University State Bank at 1354 East 55th Street on September 30, 1935. There was a great deal of gunfire exchanged during the robbery and detectives believed that the unprovoked killing of Officer Stringfellow was a pattern set by the bandits. Further investigation revealed that two bullets of differing calibers were recovered from Officer Stringfellow’s body.

On October 4, 1935, Fred Belter, age 29, a dishwasher at the Fred Harvey Restaurant, was arrested by Lieutenant Phil Carroll in the basement of his home located at 2834 North Sacramento. Belter was arrested after a clerk in a Union Station Telegraph Office told investigators that Belter was present at the robbery. Belter had also attempted to send a telegraph to his wife at the above address stating “I’ll have some money tomorrow.” Trying to send the telegraph collect, the telegraph office clerk told him that he would have to pay for the telegram before it could be sent. Belter crumpled the written telegram up threw it in the wastebasket and walked away. On January 16, 1936, John Bucur, age 33, and Benjamin Patilski, age 24, were arrested in connection with Officer Stringfellow's murder.

Officer Stringfellow was waked at his residence located at 6817 North Ottawa Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Edison Park Lutheran Church located at 6626 North Oliphant Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 7, 1935 in Acacia Park Cemetery, 7800 West Irving Park Road, Norridge, Illinois.

Patrolman William H. Stringfellow, born June 27, 1883, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on November 13, 1914.

Officer Stringfellow was a Master Mason and a member of the Austin Commandery No. 81 Knights Templars and Ben Franklin Lodge No. 962 AF&AM. He was survived by his wife, Elizabeth H.; son, Raymond, age 23; mother, Carey (nee Kitchen) and siblings: Adele Holom, Frank Kitchen, Jennie Lendsay and Sadie Soloman.

Patrolman Brian Timothy Strouse

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
03 Jan 1995
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
15806
Incident Date:
30 Jun 2001
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
33
End of Watch:
30 Jun 2001
Unit of Assignment:
12th District - Monroe
Date of Birth:
01 Jun 1968
Served:
6 years, 5 months, 25 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Emblem Cemetery - Elmhurst, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 4, Line 31
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 27-E: 22

Incident Details:

Patrolman Brian Timothy Strouse, Star #15806, aged 33 years, was a 6 year, 5 month, 25 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 12th District - Monroe Tactical Unit.

On June 30, 2001, at 2:00 a.m., Officer Strouse and his partners, Patrolmen Luis Estrada and Carlos Iglesias, were working the third watch on beat 1261B. All three officers were working as a plain-clothes tactical officers. They were conducting a surveillance of gang activity near West 18th Place and South Loomis Street. He was walking in an alley at 1835 South Loomis Street when Hector Sanchez Delgado, age 16, who was working "security" for the Ambrose Nation gang drug operation spotted Officer Strouse. Wearing a bulletproof vest and a police badge on his utility belt, Strouse yelled out, "Police, drop your gun." The boy opened fire, firing five times. Officer Strouse attempted to dive for cover behind a car and was struck once in the front of his bulletproof vest and once in the hip. As he reached cover he was struck once more in the chin, the bullet exiting the back of his head. Officer Strouse's partners ran toward the sound of the gunfire where they found Officer Strouse laying on the ground. Officer Strouse was transported to Cook County Hospital by CFD Ambulance #45 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. An at 9:09 a.m. on June 30, 2001. Delgado was taken into custody minutes later near the 1300 block of West 18th Place. The .40 caliber Smith & Wesson semiautomatic pistol used to kill Officer Strouse, with Delgado's fingerprints on the magazine, was recovered next to a fence about five blocks from the shooting.

During a videotaped interrogation, Hector Delgado confessed to shooting Officer Strouse in the alley thinking he was a rival La Raza gang member. Delgado also had a previous conviction for criminal sexual assault after he had forced a 4-year-old girl to perform oral sex on him. On September 17, 2003, Hector Delgado was convicted of 1st degree murder. On December 8, 2003, he was sentenced to life in prison.

Officer Strouse was waked at Ridgemoor Chapels located at 6453 West Irving Park Road, his funeral mass was held at Edgebrook Lutheran Church located at 5252 West Devon Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 5, 2001 in Mount Emblem Cemetery, 520 East Grand Avenue, Elmhurst, Illinois.

Patrolman Brian Timothy Strouse, born June 1, 1968, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 3, 1995. He earned 1 Life Saving Award and 61 Honorable Mentions during his Career.

Officer Strouse served in the U.S. Marine Corps, was a veteran of the Gulf War and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. Officer Strouse was survived by his parents, Ann Marie (nee Shea) and Paul A. and sisters: Cynthia, Kathleen Noncz (CPD) and Paula.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #G380439.

On June 30, 2001, Officer Strouse's star was retired by Superintendent Terry G. Hillard and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Sometime between July 2001 and 2007, the 1300 block of West 18th Place was dedicated as “Honorary Officer Brian Strouse Way.” Two brown honorary street signs were erected. One on the southeast corner of 18th Place and Throop Street and the other on the northwest corner of 18th Place and Loomis Street in the heart of the Pilsen community where Officer Strouse was killed in the line of duty.

Patrolman Robert James Strugala Sr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Mar 1973
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
10236
Incident Date:
16 Jun 1974
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
16 Jun 1974
Unit of Assignment:
10th District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
02 Jun 1945
Served:
1 year, 2 months, 28 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Resurrection Catholic Cemetery - Justice, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 28
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 43-E: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Robert James Strugala, Sr., Star #10236, aged 29 years, was a 1 year, 2 month, 28 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 10th District - Marquette.

On June 16, 1974, at 9:08 p.m., Officer Strugala and his partner, Patrolman John Wasco, age 25, were working the third watch on beat 1070. While on patrol and headed westbound on 26th Street they were stopped at a red light located at Kedzie Avenue. They heard gunshots coming from the Rio Grande Tavern located at 3157 West 26th Street. Hearing the gunfire they left the squadrol in the middle of the street and went into the tavern to investigate. Officer Strugala entered through the front door and Officer Wasco through the side entrance. Two gunmen, Antonio Arias Guillen, age 31 and Jose Guillen, age 43 were inside firing at the bartender, Julian Ortiz. Upon entry Officer Wasco ordered the gunman to drop his weapon. Jose Guillen then turned toward Officer Wasco with his gun drawn. Officer Wasco fired once striking Jose Guillen in the shoulder. Simultaneously, Antonio Guillen Arias opened fire from across the room. Officer Strugala was shot in the chest. Officer Wasco was shot in the arm, abdomen and leg. The force of the bullets from the .38 semi-automatic firearm pushed Officer Wasco out of the doorway and into the street. The firefight lasted only 30 seconds. A barmaid, Guadalupe Lazzaraga, and patron, Jesus Posatos were also shot and injured during the gunfight.

Two other tactical units, beat 961, Patrolmen E. Kodatt and J. Mucharski and beat 962, Patrolmen L. Almanza and G. Leka, were stopped in traffic at the same red light beat 1071 was at when they heard the gunfire. While sitting at the light beat 961 observed a police squadrol stopped in the middle of the street in front of the tavern. The sqadrol's driver door was open and Officer Wasco was observed standing holding a revolver with his arms extended aimed at the side door of the establishment. Beats 961 and 962 immediately pulled over and asked Officer Wasco what was going on. He stated he had been shot inside the tavern. The officers then notified Zone 6 that an officer was shot and secured both entrances to the tavern. The officers drew their revolvers and began to enter the tavern. As they approached the front door a volley of gunfire was heard from inside. In quick succession an unknown citizen ran out the front door followed by one of the offenders, Jose Guillen. He was ordered by the officers to drop his weapon. He threw the gun down on the sidewalk and attempted to flee southbound on Kedzie Avenue. He was apprehended and placed into custody by beat 961. Meanwhile beat 962 entered the tavern and discovered Officer Strugala lying behind the bar in a pool of blood.

Officer Strugala was transported to Mount Sinai Hospital by CFD Ambulance #34 and pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Bala at 9:42 p.m. on June 16, 1974. Officer Wasco was also transported to Mount Sinai Hospital where he was treated and released. He made a full recovery and returned to duty; retiring on June 15, 2004 after 34 years of service. The gunman, Jose Guillen was apprehended and Antonio Arias Guillen made good his escape and fled the state.

In October, 1974, Jose Guillen stood trial and was found guilty of Officer Strugala’s murder, Officer Wasco’s attempted murder, aggravated battery and armed violence. Guillen was sentenced to 50 to 100 years in prison for the murder Officer Strugala and to 10 to 30 years for the attempted murder of Officer Wasco. On July 19, 2004, the Illinois parole board released Jose Guillen from custody, after serving only 30 years of his 100 year sentence. Antonio Guillen Arias evaded capture and was never apprehended.

On October 3, 1986, Antonio Guillen Arias, was captured and arrested in California by the Santa Ana Police Department's Officer Oliver Lofton after he received information that Arias was wanted for murder. Arias was extradited back to Chicago, stood trial, and was convicted.

Officer Strugala was waked at Lain & Son Funeral Home located at 2121 West 95th Street, his funeral mass was held at Holy Cross Church located at 4541 South Wood Street and he was laid to rest on June 20, 1974 in Resurrection Catholic Cemetery, 7201 Archer Avenue, Justice, Illinois.

Patrolman Robert James Strugala, Sr., born June 2, 1945, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 19, 1973. He attended the O'Brien Street Police Academy and was in Recruit Class 73-2G.

Officer Strugala served in the U.S. Marine Corps from August 22, 1963 thru August 21, 1967 and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Christine Veronica (nee Reid), age 26; children: Robert James, Jr., age 2 and an Unborn Child, Jamie Maria; mother, Florence (nee Lyeek) and brothers, Donald, James, and Richard.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #P272130.

On October 21, 1982, the police department honored Officer Strugala's memory by naming the M-2 police boat in the Department's Marine Unit after him.

Detective Jerome A. Stubig

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
21 Sep 1953
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
9127
Incident Date:
14 Apr 1969
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
40
End of Watch:
14 Apr 1969
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Field Services - Detective Division: Unit 161 - Bomb & Arson Section
Date of Birth:
08 Feb 1929
Served:
15 years, 6 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Joseph Cemetery - River Grove, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 12
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 18
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 64-W: 3

Incident Details:

Detective Jerome A. Stubig, Star #9127, aged 40 years, was a 15 year, 6 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Field Services - Detective Division: Unit 161 - Bomb & Arson Section.

On April 14, 1969, at 2:51 p.m., Detective Stubig and Sergeant James R. Schaffer responded to 9521 South Exchange Avenue with Detective William McInerney and Patrolman Arthur Ciechanowski. Detective McInerney and Officer Ciechanowski climbed the stairs to the 3rd floor rear door of the building while Sergeant Schaffer and Detective Stubig waited at the ground level. The two men knocked on Frank J. Kulak's door. They announced they were police officers and Kulak answered the knock with gunfire. Both officers had been shot and injured. Sergeant Schaffer and Detective Stubig then climbed the stairs to assist and were injured by an explosion. Kulak had thrown a bomb at the two officers. As they lay injured, Kulak exited his apartment and emptied his carbine into both men, killing them. Kulak then barricaded himself in his apartment and a six-hour gun battle between Kulak, a former marine, and hundreds of heavily armed police ensued. Kulak surrendered to Deputy Police Superintendent James Rochford at 9:00 p.m. that evening. The bodies of Sergeant Schaffer and Detective Stubig were found on the rear porch. Sergeant Schaffer was transported to South Chicago Hospital by beat 470 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Carroll at 9:30 p.m. on April 14, 1969. Detective Stubig was also transported to South Chicago Hospital by beat 471 where he was pronounced dead by Dr. Carroll at 9:32 p.m. on April 14, 1969. Several other officers were injured either by gunfire or the bomb explosions. They were all treated at South Chicago Hospital and discharged.

It was later learned that Kulak was responsible for six other bombings in which two people were killed and several others injured. Kulak was taken into custody and an arsenal of weapons was recovered from his apartment. Recovered were two carbines, an M-1 rifle, two semi-automatic handguns, two 12 gauge shotguns, a grenade launcher and 30 bombs. One bomb was large enough to level the three-story building if it had gone off. 24 unexploded bombs and grenades were also found outside the building.

On May 15, 1969, Frank Kulak was indicted by the Grand Jury on the deaths of four persons. On February 27, 1970, Kulak was found incompetent to stand trial due to paranoid schizophrenia and was ordered held to a maximum security mental facility. In September 1986, the Illinois Appellate Court ruled that Kulak must be released after spending more than 15 years in a state mental health facility in Chester, Illinois. The order required the state to find Kulak eligible for commitment under a civil law proceeding as being a danger to himself and others or release him.

Detective Stubig' was waked at Drake & Son Funeral Home located at 625 Busse Highway, Park Ridge, Illinois, his funeral mass was held at Immaculate Conception Church located at 7211 West Talcott Avenue and he was laid to rest on April 18, 1969 in St. Joseph Cemetery, 3100 North Thatcher Avenue, River Grove, Illinois.

Detective Jerome A. Stubig, born February 8, 1929, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on September 21, 1953. He earned 3 Department Commendations, 3 Honorable Mentions and 7 Complimentary Letters during his career.

Detective Stubig served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of the Korean War and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Signal Corps Lineman. He was survived by his wife, Patricia F. (nee Lyons); children: Jaye, Jerry, Patrice, Scott, Sharon and Steven and parents: August and Emma (nee Entress).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #H122105.

Patrolman Victor H. Sugg

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
12 Nov 1920
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3701
Incident Date:
15 Apr 1934
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Blunt Trauma
Age:
41
End of Watch:
24 Apr 1934
Unit of Assignment:
36th District - Hudson
Date of Birth:
13 Jun 1892
Served:
13 years, 5 months, 12 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
018 - Near North

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 37
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 6-E: 15

Incident Details:

Patrolman Victor H. Sugg, Star #3701, aged 41 years, was a 13 year, 5 month, 12 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 36th District - Hudson.

On April 15, 1934, at 3:10 a.m., Officer Sugg was on patrol when he stopped to investigate three suspicious men, who were intoxicated, on the street at 2365 North Lincoln Avenue. During the investigation, one of the men attacked Officer Sugg, causing him to fall and strike his head against a brick wall. Officer Sugg was found at 3:15 a.m. and was transported to Alexian Brothers Hospital located at 1200 West Belden Avenue. Doctors determined that he suffered from a fractured skull and he lingered there for nine days succumbing to his injuries on April 24, 1934. The Coroner’s Inquest returned a verdict of murder.

Officer Sugg was waked at his residence located at 6059 West Matson Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Tarcissus Church located at 6020 West Ardmore Avenue and he was laid to rest on April 28, 1934 in St. Boniface Cemetery, 4901 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois. His remains were later moved to All Saints Catholic Cemetery, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Patrolman Victor H. Sugg, born June 13, 1892, received a Temporary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 8, 1919 prior to his Probationary Appointment to the Department on November 12, 1920. He earned 5 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $180.00 during his career.

Officer Sugg was survived by his wife, Lillian and siblings: Eugenia, Florence and Herman.

Patrolman Arthur James Sullivan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
13 Oct 1933
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3911
Incident Date:
14 Jan 1937
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
36
End of Watch:
14 Jan 1937
Unit of Assignment:
23rd District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
09 Apr 1901
Served:
3 years, 3 months, 1 day
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 40
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 18-W: 17

Incident Details:

Patrolman Arthur James Sullivan, Star #3911, aged 36 years, was a 3 year, 3 month, 1 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 23rd District - Marquette.

On January 14, 1937, at 11:45 p.m., Officer Sullivan had just finished his tour of duty and was on his way home. Casimer Kulis, a clerk in a pharmacy located at 3001 West Cermak, was inside a restaurant at Cermak Road and Kedzie Avenue when he observed Joseph Schuster walk by the window. Seeing Sullivan outside he ran and asked for his assistance knowing he was an officer. The clerk pointed out, Joseph Schuster and said, “That man robbed me of $27.00 in the drug store yesterday.“ Officer Sullivan and Kulis followed Schuster into the Kedzie Avenue Station of the Douglas Park “EL” (present day CTA Blue Line Cermak Branch). They then followed him up to the platform where Officer Sullivan confronted Schuster with the allegation and he replied, “Officer, I'm a law abiding citizen.“ Schuster protested saying Kulis was mistaken. Not believing Schuster, Officer Sullivan began a pat-down in which he failed to find a loaded revolver Schuster had in a shoulder holster. Officer Sullivan had noticed a hard protrusion but took Schuster word that it was his ribs. Sullivan then began to escort Schuster off of the platform and down the stairs. When they reached the landing, Schuster drew his gun placing it against Sullivan’s temple and pulled the trigger. The gunshot went into Sullivan’s head killing him instantly. Schuster then attempted to shoot Kulis, but his gun misfired. Schuster then fled back up the stairs and jumped onto the tracks. He ran down the tracks a little before climbing down a pillar of the elevated tracks and made good his escape.

Joseph Schuster was apprehended two days later, but wasn’t officially arrested until January 20, 1937. He was charged with the murder and stood trial. On March 3, 1937, Schuster was found guilty of Officer Sullivan's murder and sentenced to death in the electric chair. On April 6, 1937, Schuster was executed in the electric chair at Cook County Jail.

Officer Sullivan was waked at a chapel located at 3604 North Ogden Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Blessed Sacrament Parish Church located at 3528 South Hermitage Avenue and he was laid to rest on January 18, 1937 in Mount Carmel Catholic Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Arthur James Sullivan, born April 9, 1901, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 13, 1933. Prior to joining the Chicago Police Department he was a Fireman for the City of Chicago.

Officer Sullivan was survived by his wife, Katherine (nee Emmerick) and children: Arthur, Elizabeth, George, John and the late Eleanor and siblings: John and Mary Barbour.

Detective Joseph J. Sullivan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 May 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5421
Incident Date:
22 May 1929
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
22 May 1929
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Bureau
Date of Birth:
06 Jul 1901
Served:
4 years, 11 months, 26 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-12
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 24
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 14-W: 12

Incident Details:

Detective Joseph J. Sullivan, Star #5421, aged 27 years, was a 4 year, 11 month, 26 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Bureau.

On May 22, 1929, at 3:00 a.m., Detective Sullivan was found shot to death in his squad car in front of 3133 West Polk Street. Initially it was thought that his murder was in retaliation for assisting Lieutenant William Cusack’s Detective Bureau Squad. However, when Deputy Commissioner Stege received an anonymous call that theory changed. The caller stated that Detective Sullivan was murdered inside the speakeasy of Joseph “Red” Bolton located at 1610 West Polk Street. The caller then said that Elmo Clarke was the killer and that Sullivan’s body was placed inside the squad car and driven to the location where he was found. Stege then ordered Captain John Egan to investigate the claims. Captain Egan went to the location of the speakeasy and found a lamp shop. Not easily identifiable as a speakeasy from the outside, the lamp shop was a front for the speakeasy. The captain entered the building and made his way to the speakeasy, finding an empty room with no signs of a recent struggle.

The speakeasy in question was not unknown by the police, in fact two weeks prior to the murder of Detective Sullivan, a Lieutenant from a Westside station had been severely beaten there. It was at this point that some speculated the murder of Detective Sullivan was payback for coming to the aide of the Lieutenant who was a good friend. The speakeasy’s manager, Elmo Clarke, and bartender, William “Dinky” Quan” were believed to have beaten the Lieutenant. Investigators began looking for the two men so they could be questioned. Also wanted for questioning was Joseph Bolton and Bernard McComb, a patron of the speakeasy. Surprisingly, Bolton turned himself later that night; the same day as Sullivan’s Murder. However, he provided little help to reconstruct the events of the early morning murder claiming he left the place at 12:30 a.m. before Sullivan showed up. Bolton admitted to there being patrons still in the place, but refused to name names. Clarke was next to turn himself in and he also provided little information. He told police that Sullivan was there a short time before the shooting, but claimed he knew nothing else and could not identify the shooter. With no evidence to support the anonymous callers claim that Clarke shot Detective Sullivan, police released Clarke. Messages were then broadcast for the arrest of his bartender, William "Dinky" Quan and Bernard McComb.

On September 10, 1929, William Quan, was apprehended and police learned that Detective Sullivan had been in the saloon only a short time before he was slain. He was said to be trying to gain information related to the kidnapping in which Detective Raymond Martin was killed. This supported the theory that Detective Sullivan was killed because he found an important clue in the investigation.

A new theory was developed through the course of investigation. Detective Joseph J. Sullivan was investigating the murder of Patrolman Raymond E. Martin who was killed on May 15, 1929 while working as a decoy in the David Blumenthal kidnaping plot. Detective Sullivan's investigation took him to Joseph "Red" Bolton's Saloon, located at 1610 West Taylor Street, he arrived with the intention of gathering evidence in the David Blumenthal kidnaping plot. The bartender, William Quan, of the saloon was being sought for the murder of Officer Martin after police received an anonymous phone tip. After entering the saloon an altercation ensued and Detective Sullivan was shot to death in a hand-to-hand gun battle with Quan.

Another support for this contention was revealed when Detective Sullivan's fiancée, Alice Bates, told investigators that he had phoned her hours earlier and told her he intended to visit the saloon to search for a suspect in the kidnapping. Others believed Sullivan was investigating the shooting of a post-office inspector, Evan L. Jackson several weeks earlier. Sullivan had gone to the speakeasy in search of William Doody, a notorious baby faced criminal. Official records offer no definitive explanation for Detective Sullivan’s murder, but all theories led to his death being classified as in the performance of his duties.

On May 22, 1929, Bolton was booked for accessory to murder but on June 14, 1929 was discharged by Judge Jonas. On August 4, 1929, William Barry, age 30, was arrested as a suspect in this case, he leaped from a window of the Bureau of Identification, located at 1121 South State Street, onto a moving "L" train in an effort to escape and was killed. On September 10, 1929, Quan was arrested and after questioning turned over to the Sheriff on a Coroner's Mittimus. In November 1929, the Grand Jury returned a No Bill and he was released. On December 27, 1929, Quan and two other gangsters were shot to death by Sergeant Patrick B. O'Connell and his Detective Division - Ford Squad 21-A. Quan and his men were killed after they were trapped in a union headquarters, located at 14 North Sacramento Boulevard, which they entered heavily armed with the purpose of extorting $10,000.00 from the president of the union. On November 15, 1929, the Grand Jury returned a No Bill on Quan and he was once again released.

Detective Sullivan was waked at his residence located at 1037 South Mayfield Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Francis Assisi Church located at 813 West Roosevelt Road and he was laid to rest on May 25, 1929 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Detective Joseph J. Sullivan, born July 6, 1901, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 26, 1924. He earned 3 Credible Mentions and 2 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $600.00 during his career.

Detective Sullivan was survived by his fiancée, Alice Bates and father, Sergeant Jeremiah Sullivan (CPD).

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #11046.

Patrolman Lawrence P. Sullivan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5225
Incident Date:
16 Apr 1925
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
16 Apr 1925
Unit of Assignment:
District 9 - Kensington
Date of Birth:
08 Oct 1897
Served:
2 years, 10 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-9
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 13
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 62-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman Lawrence P. Sullivan, Star #5225, aged 27 years, was a 2 year, 10 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 9 - Kensington.

On April 15, 1925, at 10:40 p.m., Officer Sullivan was on patrol with his partner, Patrolman Patrick H. Devine when they observed two suspicious men on 116th Street approximately 100 feet east of South Indiana Avenue. The officers stopped to question the men about a recent robbery. Officer Devine stepped out of the squad car and seized one of the men while the other, Earl Lucio, age 22, of 11455 South Indian Avenue, began to fire at Officer Sullivan. Lucio fired several times, striking Officer Sullivan mortally wounding him. Officer Devine returned fire, killing Lucio. Officer Sullivan was rushed to Pullman Hospital, where he died of his injuries the following day on April 16, 1925.

Officer Sullivan was laid to rest in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Lawrence P. Sullivan, born October 8, 1897, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 9, 1922. He earned 2 Credible Mentions and 1 Extra Compensation for Meritorious Conduct totaling $120.00 during his career.

Officer Sullivan was survived by his parents.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #8958.

Sergeant Sidney Thomas Sullivan

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
14 May 1914
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1258
Incident Date:
31 Jan 1937
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
49
End of Watch:
31 Jan 1937
Unit of Assignment:
26th District - Desplaines
Date of Birth:
07 Jan 1888
Served:
22 years, 8 months, 17 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
Broadview, IL

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
All Saints Catholic Cemetery - Des Plaines, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 22
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3-W: 28

Incident Details:

Sergeant Sidney Thomas Sullivan, Star #1258, aged 49 years, was a 22 year, 8 month, 17 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 26th District - Desplaines.

On January 31, 1937, Sergeant Sullivan was enroute to interview an informant at the Desplaines Street Station regarding a string of recent taxicab robberies. The informant was to give the sergeant a name of a group of bandits responsible for the robberies. Sergeant Sullivan's automobile skidded on a patch of ice and crashed into a ditch. He walked approximately two miles searching for help when he was accidentally struck by a passing vehicle driving on Roosevelt Road near Hillside, which also skidded on the ice.

The driver of the car was held to an inquest by the Coroner. The driver testified that fog had obscured his vision and that when he applied the brakes to avoid hitting Sergeant Sullivan his car had skidded and then struck the sergeant. A Coroner’s Jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

Sergeant Sullivan was waked at a funeral home located at 5350 West North Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Peter Canisius Church located at 5057 West North Avenue and he was laid to rest on February 3, 1937 in All Saints Catholic Cemetery, 700 North River Road, Des Plaines, Illinois.

Sergeant Sidney Thomas Sullivan, born January 7 1888, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 14, 1914. He earned 6 Credible Mentions and 2 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $240.00 during his career. On December 24, 1927, Sullivan was promoted to Sergeant. Sergeant Sullivan was referred to as a “brilliant detective“ by his captains at the Desplaines Street Station. Prior to joining the Chicago Police Department he was a Fireman for the City of Chicago.

Sergeant Sullivan was survived by his wife, Virginia (nee Kelley); children: Thomas S., age 18 and Virginia Mary, age 6 and siblings: Isabell Nies, John L., Mrs. Craig Benson, Mrs. F. G. Orsinger. His brother, Lieutenant John L. Sullivan, was Chief of Detectives with the Chicago Police Department. Sergeant Sullivan's son, grandson, brother, and two nephews also served distinguished careers with the Chicago Police Department for almost a century.

On November 14, 2006, Sergeant Sullivan's star was retired by Superintendent Philip J. Cline and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Blanton W. Sutton

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
08 Jun 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
5275
Incident Date:
04 Jun 1923
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
04 Jun 1923
Unit of Assignment:
District 2-A - Stanton
Date of Birth:
27 Feb 1892
Served:
11 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 8
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 11-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Blanton W. Sutton, Star #5275, aged 30 years, was a 11 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2-A - Stanton.

On June 4, 1923, at 10:20 p.m., Officer Sutton while on duty went to a pool hall located at 60 West 37th Street in search of an unknown person. According to the owner of the pool hall, Mrs. Forbes, Sutton walked up and down the length of the poolroom several times. He then made his way to the exit satisfied that the person he was looking for was not in the pool hall. As he was leaving the establishment he stopped to talk with Mrs. Forbes near the front door. While they were conversing he spotted Ernest Jackson, a laborer. Jackson, who was known to police, entered the pool hall and scowled at the officer. Taking offense, Officer Sutton remarked to Mrs. Forbes, “That man wants to be arrested. Maybe we’d better take him over to a whaling.” Officer Sutton suspected that Jackson was concealing a weapon and followed him to a pool table at the back of the hall. Patrolman Sutton confronted the man and began to question him. After a few question, Officer Sutton began to search him for concealed weapons. Jackson resisted backing away and drawing his gun. Sutton wasted no time and quickly drew his gun. Suddenly, they both fired on each other. Two shots were heard in quick succession. Officer Sutton was struck and fell to the floor mortally wounded. Jackson then fled the scene making good his escape. James Wisger, a patron, was also accidentally struck by a stray bullet in the commotion and died at the scene. Officer Sutton was taken to Provident Hospital but died enroute.

Jackson was later arrested and committed suicide while in police custody.

Officer Sutton was waked at his residence located at 6446 South Champlain Avneue and he was laid to rest on June 11, 1923 in Lincoln Cemetery, 2300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Blanton W. Sutton, born February 27, 1892, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 8, 1922.

Officer Sutton was survived by his wife, Margaret.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #7462.

Park Policeman Arthur Maurice Swanson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Park District Police Department
Appointed Date:
1926
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
547
Incident Date:
14 May 1936
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
39
End of Watch:
21 May 1936
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
11 Mar 1897
Served:
10 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Hill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 39
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 24-E: 12

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Arthur Maurice Swanson, Star #547, aged 39 years, was a 10 year veteran of the Chicago Park District Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On May 14, 1936, Officer Swanson was injured while riding his police motorcycle near 36th Street and Michigan Avenue. The officer drove over an oil spot at 3600 South Michigan Avenue causing him to lose control of the motorcycle and overturn. Another policeman who was riding next to him also crashed and was seriously injured but survived the crash. Officer Swanson was transported to Mercy Hospital where he died seven days later on May 21, 1936.

Officer Swanson was waked at Western Undertakers Parlor located at 6659 South Halsted, his funeral mass was also held at the Western Undertakers Parlor and he was laid to rest on May 25, 1936 in Oak Hill Cemetery, 11900 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Park Policeman Arthur Maurice Swanson, born on March 11, 1897, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Park District Police Department in 1926.

Officer Swanson served in the U.S. Navy and was Honorably Discharged at the rank of Gunners Mate #rd Class Petty Officer. He was also a member of Chicago Park District Post No. 775 American Legion, Chicago Park Policemen's Benevolent Association, South Gate Lodge No. 968 AF&AM and South Park Veterans of Foreign Wars. Officer Swanson was survived by his wife, Hedvig (nee Peterson); children: Rita Mae and Russell; father, Charles G. and siblings: Alice E., Carl and Elmer.

The Chicago Park District Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on December 31, 1957. On January 1, 1958, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Police Department through an intergovernmental agreement. Fallen officers of the Chicago Park District Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman James Patrick Sweeney

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
01 Mar 1959
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4897
Incident Date:
13 May 1968
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle
Age:
40
End of Watch:
28 Oct 1978
Unit of Assignment:
Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division: Unit 052 - Area 2 Task Force
Date of Birth:
13 Dec 1927
Served:
19 years, 7 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Sepulchre Cemetery - Alsip, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman James Patrick Sweeney, Star #4897, aged 40 years, was a 19 year, 7 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Bureau of Operational Services - Patrol Division: Unit 052 - Area 2 Task Force.

On May 13, 1968, Officer Sweeney, along with several other officers, were assigned to transport several police motorcycles from the Kenmore Garage located at 2938 East 89th Street to the Area 4 Garage. The motorcycle were being moved in anticipation of the opening of the Chicago City beaches. While en route to the Area 4 Garage, they were traveling southbound on Lake Shore Drive at 31st Street when the left rear wheel of Officer Sweeney's 3-wheel police motorcycle #6307 fell off. Officer Sweeney's motorcycle began to drift over to the median strip, throwing him from the motorcycle into oncoming traffic. The motorcycle then rolled over him. He struck the pavement and suffered multiple injuries including a skull fracture, even though he was wearing a helmet, a ruptured spleen, nerve injury to the 6th and 7th cranial nerves, fracture to the left clavicle, fractures to the 5th and 6th ribs and multiple contusions and lacerations. The other officers immediately stopped and rendered aid. Officer Sweeney was transported to Michael Reese Hospital by CFD. He went into a coma and had surgery several times due to internal bleeding and remained in intensive care for six weeks. On October 13, 1968, Officer Sweeney was discharged from the hospital. He became partially paralyzed and one eye was stitched closed, in addition to having an open draining incision on his abdomen. He was also diagnosed with Jacksonian Epilepsy due to the head trauma he sustained in the crash. The results of the accident were so profound that he would require constant medical attention for the rest of his life.

Officer Sweeney was 40 years old at the time of the incident. The injuries he sustained forced him onto the Disability Pension Roll (DPR) on June 6, 1969. On November 16, 1970, Officer Sweeney was re-appointed to the Department and placed on desk duty. On October 29, 1978, Officer Sweeney entered the emergency room at Michael Reese Hospital, where he suffered a seizure and died from complications resulting from his line of duty injury.

An investigation into the crash determined that the repair shop failed to properly maintain the motorcycle.

Officer Sweeney was waked at Kenny Brothers Funeral Home located at 3600 95th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois, his funeral mass was held at Queen of Martyrs Church located at 10233 South Central Park Avenue and he was laid to rest on October 31, 1978 in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, 6001 West 111th Street, Alsip, Illinois.

Patrolman James Patrick Sweeney, born December 13, 1927, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 1, 1959.

Officer Sweeney was survived by his ex-wife, Mary Denise (nee Brizich); children: Catherine M., James P., Kevin P., Mary Denise, Patrick E. and Patrick T.; mother: Margaret McHugh and brother, John M. (CPD).

On February 20, 2008, Officer Sweeney's star was retired by Superintendent Jody P. Weis and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman John J. Sweeney

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
411
Incident Date:
07 Jul 1929
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
37
End of Watch:
07 Jul 1929
Unit of Assignment:
29th District - West Chicago
Date of Birth:
07 Dec 1891
Served:
6 years, 8 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
014 - Shakespeare

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 15
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 25
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1-E: 12

Incident Details:

Patrolman John J. Sweeney, Star #411, aged 37 years, was a 6 year, 8 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 29th District - West Chicago.

On July 7, 1929, at 2:50 a.m., Officer Sweeney, while on patrol, observed a gunman robbing a taxi cab driver. As Officer Sweeney pursued, the offender fled into an alley. As Officer Sweeney confronted the gunman, the offender opened fire. Officer Sweeney sustained a gunshot wound to the chest striking his heart during the encounter.

At the same time Patrolmen Peter Arnold, Thomas Buckley and Joseph Moffat, while working the patrol wagon, were at 836 North Noble Street. They were there to arrest a man whose wife had sworn out a complaint against him. While at the address they heard a succession of shots. The officers immediately rush out to investigate racing down the alley between Noble and Rose Streets. They were just off of Chicago Avenue and came to a screeching halt when they found Officer Sweeney’s unconscious body lying on the ground. Sweeney was bleeding from a gunshot wound to the chest. The alley was quickly searched but no suspects or clues were found. Officer Sweeney was then rushed to the nearest hospital dying en route.

The case was a mystery until July 25, 1920, when John Wysocki, a career thief, confessed to shooting Sweeney. He said he shot Sweeney, as he attempted to arrest him, just after he had robbed a Checker Cab chauffeur and was making his escape. His arrest followed the commission of a similar holdup. On July 30, 1929, Wysocki was indicted for the murder of Officer Sweeney. On August 3, 1929, he was sentenced to 78 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet by Judge Kerner. In 1957, John Wysocki died while still incarcerated.

Officer Sweeney was waked at his residence located at 4934 West Superior Street, his funeral mass was held at Our Lady Help of Christians Church located at 832 North Leclaire Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 10, 1929 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman John J. Sweeney, born December 7, 1891, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 26, 1922.

Officer Sweeney served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of World War I and was Honorably Discharged. He was also a member of Chicago Police Post No. 207 American Legion and the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. Officer Sweeney was survived by his wife, Margaret (nee Mahoney); children: Jay, Margaret, Matthew and Timothy and siblings: Bridget, Michael, Nora Caplis and Timothy.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #11047.

Patrolman Louis C. Szewczyk

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Feb 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2521
Incident Date:
27 Jan 1930
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
34
End of Watch:
27 Jan 1930
Unit of Assignment:
8th District - South Chicago
Date of Birth:
25 Aug 1895
Served:
7 years, 11 months, 25 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery - Calumet City, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-1
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 14
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 26
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Louis C. Szewczyk, Star #2521, aged 34 years, was a 7 year, 11 month, 25 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 8th District - South Chicago.

On January 27, 1930, at 11:45 p.m., Officer Szewczyk and his partner, Patrolman Daniel Collins, were on patrol. They were working a plain-clothes detail and observed three Mexican men walking on the Southeast side of 90th Street near Buffalo Avenue. They noticed the appearance of their walk was suspicious. When they stopped, approximately eight feet from the men and identified themselves as policemen, Max Garcia suddenly drew his revolver and fired. The first shot struck Szewczyk in the chest near the heart. Officer Collins returned fire when Garcia turned and fled northbound on Buffalo Avenue while his companions fled in the opposite direction. Officer Collins pursued and exchanged shots with Garcia as they ran. They ran for three blocks, both emptying their guns, at which time Officer Collins was able to apprehend Garcia and disarm him. Officer Szewczyk was rushed to Illinois Steel Company Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival.

The arrest of Max Garcia led to the arrest of his two confederates, Jose Garcia and Alphonso Reyes after he identified them. On January 28, 1930 all three were held by the Coroner to the Grand Jury on a charge of murder. On May 16, 1930, Max Garcia was sentenced to 25 years in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. The cases against Jose Garcia and Alphonso Reyes were nolle prossed by Judge Kerner.

Officer Szewczyk was laid to rest on February 1, 1930 in Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery, 801 Michigan City Road, Calumet City, Illinois.

Patrolman Louis C. Szewczyk, born August 25, 1895, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 2, 1922. Prior to joining the Chicago Police Department Szewczyk was a Patrolman for the Pennsylvania Railroad Police Department.

Officer Szewczyk was survived by his wife, Anna and two children, both under the age of 5.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #11079.