LINE OF DUTY DEATHS

Checkerboard Band

Roll Call of all Line of Duty Deaths. A Line of Duty Death is classified as the death of an active sworn member by felonious or accidental means during the course of performing police functions while on or off duty.

1 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Patrolman Dorelle C. Brandon

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
27 Feb 1978
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2684
Incident Date:
25 Jan 1984
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly (Accidental)
Age:
35
End of Watch:
25 Jan 1984
Unit of Assignment:
3rd District - Grand Crossing
Date of Birth:
27 Dec 1948
Served:
5 years, 10 months, 29 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
005 - Calumet

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 39
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 61-E: 10

Incident Details:

Patrolman Dorelle C. Brandon, Star #2684, aged 35 years, was a 5 year, 10 month, 29 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 3rd District - Grand Crossing Tactical Unit.

On January 25, 1984, Officer Brandon was undercover and working with her partner Patrolman Clarence Keith. The officers were engaged in a "controlled buy" of cocaine after receiving information from an informant. The informant had called ahead to Anthony Brown and arranged to buy a quantity of cocaine for him self and “girlfriend,” Officer Brandon. Officers Brandon, Keith, the informant and two other plainclothes officers proceeded to Brown’s home located at 10742 South Calumet Avenue.

Upon arrival, Officer Brandon and the informant walked up to the front door of the building. Officer Keith concealed himself in a hallway. Officer Brandon and the informant were then told to come in through the rear entrance of the apartment. Hearing this, Officer Brandon told Officer Keith to follow them a half minute later. Once at the rear door they entered the apartment and Brown pulled a set of burglar bars across the rear entrance to the apartment and locked them. Officer Brandon then observed Brown sell one gram of cocaine for $100.00 and immediately announced her office. She drew her .38 caliber snub nose service revolver and attempted to place Brown into custody. Brown resisted and a struggle for her gun ensued. During the struggle, Officer Keith unable to make entry, attempted to shoot Brown through the steel bars. Tragically, one of his shots accidentally hit Officer Brandon in the head. Brown was also shot in the abdomen and legs. Officer Brandon later died as a result of her injuries.

Anthony Brown was arrested and charged with murder, attempted murder, aggravated battery and possession of a controlled substance. Brown was convicted on the drug charges during his first trial. During the same trial, a mistrial was declared on the murder and attempted murder counts. The jury could not come to an agreement regarding the murder charges. As a result, Brown was exonerated of the murder charges.

Officer Brandon was waked at Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 10456 South Western Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Joachim's Catholic Church located at 700 East 91st Street and she was laid to rest on January 28, 1984 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Dorelle C. Brandon, born December 27, 1948, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 27, 1976.

Officer Brandon was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by her husband, Matthew (CPD); daughter, Barbara; stepsons: Marvin and Sean; parents: Charles and Dolores; three brothers; and five sisters.

Sergeant Edward H. Breen

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
29 Feb 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
11 Jul 1954
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
54
End of Watch:
11 Jul 1954
Unit of Assignment:
20th District - Brighton Park
Date of Birth:
26 Mar 1900
Served:
30 years, 4 months, 11 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 7
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Sergeant Edward H. Breen, Star # Unknown, aged 54 years, was a 30 year, 4 month, 11 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 20th District - Brighton Park.

On July 11, 1954, Sergeant Edward Breen, while on duty as a supervising sergeant, was involved in an automobile accident near the intersection of Pershing Road and Hermitage Avenue. His patrol car had crashed into a metal post and was found with its red emergency light flashing. It was believed that he was chasing another vehicle for a traffic infraction when the crash occurred. Sergeant Breen was transported to Southtown Hospital where he died from injuries sustained in the crash.

Sergeant Breen was waked at Kenny Brothers Funeral Home located at 5438 South Halsted Street, his funeral mass was held at St. Clare de Montefalco Church located at 5443 South Washtenaw Avenue and he was laid to rest on July 14, 1954 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 87th Street and Hamlin Avenue, Evergreen Park, Illinois. His grave is located in Lot N 1/2 X368, Section G.

Sergeant Edward H. Breen, born March 26, 1900, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 29, 1924. He earned 3 Credible Mentions and 2 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $240.00 during his career. Breen was promoted to Sergeant on February 9, 1945.

Sergeant Breen was survived by his wife, Ann (nee Brankin); parents: John and the late Katherine Fenton and siblings: Helen Singer, Lawrence and Thomas.

Patrolman Cornelius Broderick

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
10 Jul 1913
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4643
Incident Date:
24 Aug 1924
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
45
End of Watch:
25 Aug 1924
Unit of Assignment:
District 2-A - Stanton
Date of Birth:
11 Oct 1878
Served:
11 years, 1 month, 15 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 11
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 15-W: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Cornelius Broderick, Star #4643, aged 45 years, was an 11 year, 1 month, 15 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 2-A - Stanton.

On August 24, 1924, at 10:30 p.m., Officer Broderick and Patrolman Edward Mulcahy were inside the Stanton Station when a citizen, Lonnie Kennedy of 3500 South Wabash Avenue, entered and reported that he was robbed by two men. Mr. Kennedy stated that he had chased the thieves to 35th Street and Giles Avenue and that they were still loitering at that intersection.

Officer Broderick and Officer Mulcahy responded to the location with Mr. Kennedy in an attempt to locate the men. When the two men, Willis Sams, age 20 and another, spotted the officers approaching from across the street they fled and hid in a doorway. From the shadows of the doorway, Sams fired at the officers. Officer Mulcahy was hit twice, once in the stomach and once in his left leg. Officer Broderick was hit once in the chest, the bullet entering just below his heart. Officer Broderick was able to draw his gun and return fire as the men fled on foot. He struck Sams twice in the back before he made good his escape. Both officers were transported to Lakeside Hospital where they were not expected to survive. However, Officer Mulcahy was able to pull through and recovered. Officer Broderick was not so fortunate and died the next day on August 25, 1924. Before Broderick died he stated that he had wounded one of the men as they ran.

After the shooting, all available policemen from the district, complimented by ten Detective Bureau squads, flooded the Southside in search of Sams. More than 25 suspects were arrested and held for questioning. Police caught a break when Sergeant Louis Klatzke went into the Oak Pharmacy located at 1000 North Wells Street to buy a pack of cigarettes. While inside he overheard a man, Hugh Truvillion, asking the druggist about acid for a friend shot during a craps game argument. Sergeant Klatzke arrested Truvillion and sent officer to his home. Upon arrival officer found Sims with two bullet wounds in his back. They placed him in custody and searched the apartment. Recovered were two .45 caliber pistols, which had recently been fired. During questioning, Sims stated that he had been injured in a brawl that took place on South State Street. However, investigators did not believe him and charged him with murder.

On September 19, 1924, Willis Sams was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner and was indicted. He stood trial and on June 30, 1925 a jury in Judge Hoses Wells’ courtroom found him guilty and sentenced him to death on the gallows. On June 19, 1925, he was hanged at Cook County Jail.

Officer Broderick was waked at his residence located at 214 West Garfield Boulevard and he was laid to rest in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Cornelius Broderick, born October 11, 1878, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on July 10, 1913. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Broderick was survived by his wife, Margaret and stepson.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Patrolman Edgar J. Bronson Jr.

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
22 Jan 1968
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
13534
Incident Date:
30 Jan 1971
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
27
End of Watch:
30 Jan 1971
Unit of Assignment:
11th District - Fillmore
Date of Birth:
24 Oct 1943
Served:
3 years, 0 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 8
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 23
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 49-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Edgar J. Bronson, Jr., Star #13534, aged 27 years, was a 3 year, 0 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 11th District - Fillmore Community Service Office.

On January 30, 1971, at 5:30 p.m., Officer Bronson was off duty in plain clothes when he was stopped by Eugene Thurman, age 20, of 1555 South Karlov Avenue. Thurman knew Bronson to be a policeman. Thurman stated he was cheated out of money at a dice game at Ace Livery located at 4021 West 16th Street and asked Officer Bronson to resolve the dispute. Officer Bronson entered the garage with Thurman and as he attempted to intercede in the gambling dispute an argument erupted. The argument was between Officer Bronson and Frank Eddie Outley, Jr., age 44, a notorious gambler also known as “Big Red.” At some point during the argument Outley produced a .22 caliber revolver, this prompted Thurman to tell Outley that he was a policeman. Without saying a word, Outley placed the revolver to Officer Bronson’s head and pulled the trigger before he calmly walked away. The manager of the cab stand, Jim White, age 39, heard the shot while he was outside and as he entered Outley walked past him and left the garage. Officer Bronson was struck at point blank range, the bullet entering his right cheek and exiting on the left side of his head three inches above the left ear. He was transported to Mount Sinai Hospital by beat 1070 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Fethna at 5:44 p.m. on January 30, 1971.

On February 3, 1971, Outley surrendered to Criminal Court Judge Saul A. Epton. He was arrested and charged with Officer Bronson's murder. Outley was ordered held without bail by Judge Hechinger and remanded to the County Jail pending trial. On March 29, 1971, Outley was indicted for murder. On September 15, 1971, Outley's bench trial began in Judge Daniel J. Ryan's courtroom. On September 29, 1971, he was found not guilty of all charges by Judge Ryan.

Officer Bronson was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Omega Baptist Church located at 4627 South State Street and he was laid to rest on February 4, 1971 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Edgar J. Bronson, Jr., born October 24, 1943, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department in January 22, 1968.

Officer Bronson served in the U.S. Army for 3 years, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his parents: Edgar J., Sr. and Velma (nee Sorrell); two sisters and aunt, Juanita Mayfield.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #K038291.

Patrolman Oscar E. Brosseau

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 Apr 1906
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
174
Incident Date:
01 Jun 1933
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Blunt Trauma
Age:
55
End of Watch:
20 Jun 1933
Unit of Assignment:
25th District - Fillmore
Date of Birth:
02 Jan 1878
Served:
27 years, 2 months, 18 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
010 - Ogden

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # C-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 35
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 39-E: 5

Incident Details:

Patrolman Oscar E. Brosseau, Star #174, aged 55 years, was a 27 year, 2 month, 18 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 25th District - Fillmore

On June 1, 1933, Officer Brosseau was assigned to preserve order outside the Royale Bakery located at 1240 South Kedzie Avenue where a labor demonstration was being held because the bakery was employing non-union workers. Officer Brosseau was charged with keeping picketers from the local 237 of the Jewish Baker’s Union, in order. At 9:50 p.m., the picketers became violent and attacked Officer Brosseau severely beating him with a baseball bat. Officer Brosseau was taken to St. Anthony’s Hospital where he lingered for three weeks before succumbing to his injuries on June 20, 1933. Per the Coroner’s report, his official cause of death was, “Pulmonary embolism result of a fracture of the patella bone, due to external violence.”

On June 22, 1933 Al Goldberg, Sam Goodman, Morris Kauffman and Nathan Stein were arrested as accessories to murder. On July 7, 1933, the Coroner’s Jury recommended the arrest of his assailants on the charge of manslaughter. On July 25, 1933, all four men were discharged by Judge Hayes.

Officer Brosseau was laid to rest on June 23, 1933 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Patrolman Oscar E. Brosseau, born January 2, 1878, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 2, 1906.

Officer Brosseau was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Nellie; mother, Virginia (nee Grand); sister and two brothers. One of his brothers, George, was also a Chicago Policeman in the Warren Avenue Station.

Patrolman Albert H. Brown

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
27 Oct 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2806
Incident Date:
05 Jul 1955
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
60
End of Watch:
19 Jul 1955
Unit of Assignment:
32nd District - Shakespeare
Date of Birth:
12 Mar 1895
Served:
32 years, 8 months, 23 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
014 - Shakespeare

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Forest Home Cemetery - Forest Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 48
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 35-E: 13

Incident Details:

Patrolman Albert H. Brown, Star #2806, aged 60 years, was a 32 year, 8 month, 23 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 32nd District - Shakespeare.

On July 5, 1955, Officer Brown was on duty working as a Lockup Keeper. While at the front desk one of the prisoners, Robert DiCocco, alias Ronald C. Dean, age 16 of 2141 West Caton Street, was able to pick his cell lock and enter an outer office in the lockup. DiCocco stole Officer Brown's service revolver from a desk drawer. As Officer Brown returned to the lockup area the killer attacked him and shot him in the abdomen. Although seriously wounded, Officer Brown continued to struggle with the assailant and regained control of his service weapon before the gunman escaped. Officer Brown was transported to Alexian Brothers Hospital where he succumbed to the gunshot wound ten days later on July 19, 1955. Robert DiCocco was apprehended two days later.

On July 7, 1955, Robert DiCocco was captured at North Avenue Beach By Detective Anthony Osterkorn and Juvenile Officer William Touhey and was held on an Assault to Kill charge. Police had received a tip that DiCocco frequented the beach, and six men were assigned to look for him. Osterkorn and Touhey were walking on a path in Lincoln Park, south of North Avenue, near the anti-aircraft gun emplacement. Both policemen had pictures of DiCocco. Detective Osterkorn spotted Dean from 300 feet and after the officers had confronted him the youth readily admitted his identity, saying: “You got me. I'm the one who shot the policeman.“ Osterkorn took 11 bullets of .38 caliber from DiCocco's pockets. Osterkorn and Touhey called a police wagon and took Dean to Alexian Brothers Hospital and to Patrolman Brown's room, where they asked him: “Do you know that man?“ “That's the policeman I shot,“ Dean replied. Brown, who was in critical condition with wounds in the left hand, right arm, and abdomen, nodded his head at DiCocco, but was unable to speak.

At the Shakespeare Avenue Station, Lester Shapiro, Assistant State's Attorney, and a court reporter questioned DiCocco. DiCocco said he found a beer can opener in his cell with which he pried loose a wire mesh to get into the room where the lockup keeper's gun was kept. He searched the desk and took out the policeman's .38 caliber revolver and six extra shells from the gun belt. DiCocco said he could not get out the general lockup door, so he waited until Brown came thru the door. DiCocco said Brown told 'him, “You're not going to shoot me,“ and kept walking toward Dean. Dean said the policeman kept coming, pulled the trigger twice, and then ran to the street. Dean said he slept in a hall way Wednesday night, July 6th, and made his way early, July 8th, to the North Avenue Beach. DiCocco, a former inmate of the Illinois State Training School for Boys in Kane County, had been arrested Monday, July 4, 1955, at 2140 Concord Place by North Avenue police on a charge of tampering with an automobile. He faced return to the training school as a parole violator.

DiCocco was indicted and on July 21, 1955 and a True Bill was returned from the Grand Jury. Robert DiCocco was tried and convicted. On December 13, 1955, he was sentenced to life imprisonment in Joliet State Penitentiary by Judge James R. Bryant.

Officer Brown was waked at Olson Funeral Home located at 3234 West North Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at Olson Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on July 23, 1955 in Forest Home Cemetery, 863 Desplaines Avenue, Forest Park, Illinois.

Patrolman Albert H. Brown, born March 12, 1895, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on October 22, 1922. He earned 3 Credible Mentions and 2 Extra Compensations for Meritorious Conduct totaling $420.00 during his career.

Officer Brown was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and the Greater Chicago Lodge No. 3, Loyal Order of Moose. He was survived by his wife, Hattie (nee Brunke); sons: Albert, Jr. and Walter; siblings: Chester, Ethel Miller and Lillian and grandchild, Kenneth. Albert, Jr. died in an automobile crash later in the same year of his father’s death.

Patrolman Jessie J. Brown

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Jun 1973
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
10329
Incident Date:
11 Feb 1975
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly (Accidental)
Age:
27
End of Watch:
11 Feb 1975
Unit of Assignment:
4th District - South Chicago
Date of Birth:
16 Nov 1947
Served:
1 year, 8 months, 7 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Oak Woods Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-6
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 30
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-W: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman Jessie J. Brown, Star #10329, aged 27 years, was a 1 year, 8 month, 7 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 4th District - South Chicago.

On February 11, 1975, at 4:33 p.m., Officer Brown was working with his partner Patrolman S. Herron on beat 416. They responded to a call of a 10-1 by beat 420, Patrolmen McCorkle and Patrick Ryan who were assigned to a man with a shotgun at 8906 South Brandon Avenue. Shirley Driver, age 22, called 911 to report that her boyfriend Darris L. Ambrose, age 20, of 9039 South Buffalo Avenue, was armed with a shotgun and was trying to forcibly gain entrance into her apartment. Police had been to this location previously regarding Ambrose behavior. Officers McCorkle and Ryan arrived on scene and as they opened a door leading to the 1st floor hallway, Ambrose who was hiding under a staircase, jumped out with a shotgun in his hand and yelled, "Motherfucker, I'm going to kill you" to Officer Ryan. Ambrose hiding in a stairwell leading to the basement of the building with a shotgun in one hand and a revolver in the other and had amassed a collection of guns and ammunition that he had arranged them on the stairs. Present was the shotgun, a .32 caliber revolver, a pellet gun and 25 shotgun shells. Hearing Ambrose threat, the officers backed off and radioed in a 10-1 for more backup.

The officers waited for more responding officers to arrive, Beats: 404, Patrolmen Warner Campbell and Gene E. Taylor; 413, Patrolman Raymond Mills; 416 and Patrolmen Jessie J. Brown and Samuel Herron responded to the scene. The officers made entry through the side window of the Boyd family's apartment and advanced through the apartment to the basement corridor at a position behind where Ambrose was holed up. Officer Campbell exited the apartment and confronted Ambrose. Ambrose spun around with a shotgun in one hand and a revolver in the other pointing the revolver at Officer Campbell. Officer Campbell pushed the shotgun aside, grabbed Ambrose's revolver and struck him on the head with his service revolver causing Ambrose to crouch down. A struggle then ensued and Officer Taylor grabbed Ambrose from the rear. At this point the shotgun had fallen to the floor and the revolver was taken from Ambrose. During the struggle Ambrose grabbed Officer Taylor's right hand in which he was holding his auxiliary weapon. The weapon discharged and the bullet struck Officer Brown in the abdomen, the bullet lacerating his liver and penetrating his heart, which caused him to collapse to the floor. Ambrose kept shouting that the officers would have to kill him. Ambrose was able to be subdued and placed into custody shortly after the discharge while other officer carried Officer Brown out to the squadrol. Officer Brown was transported to South Chicago Community Hospital by beat 472. He underwent surgercy and died on the operating room table. Officer Brown was pronounced dead by Dr. Magsaysay at 8:20 p.m. on February 11, 1975.

Darris Ambrose was arrested and charged with 1st degree murder, five counts of attempted murder, four counts of armed violence, one count of resisting arrest and several gun related charges. His plea for bail was denied and he was ordered held without bail pending his trial by Judge Thomas W. Walsh.

Officer Brown was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at A. R. Leak Funeral Home, was cremated, and laid to rest on February 17, 1975 in Oak Woods Cemetery, 1035 East 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Jessie J. Brown, born November 16, 1947, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 4, 1973. He earned 1 Honored Police Star (posthumously) during his career.

Officer Brown served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1971 to 1972, was a veteran of the Vietnam War and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his wife, Leora (nee Towns), age 26; children: Carmen Anise Towns, age 1 and Lavora Marie Towns, age 8 and step-child, Tanya Wilson, age 4.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #T056138.

Patrolman Melvin E. Brown

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
27 Jun 1966
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
12360
Incident Date:
02 Jun 1970
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
03 Jun 1970
Unit of Assignment:
10th District - Marquette
Date of Birth:
13 Feb 1940
Served:
3 years, 11 months, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
003 - Grand Crossing

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Lincoln Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 24
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 22
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 19-E: 2

Incident Details:

Patrolman Melvin E. Brown, Star #12360, aged 30 years, was a 3 year, 11 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 10th District - Marquette.

On June 2, 1970, at 11:57 p.m., Officer Brown was off duty and in the New Pioneer Lounge and Restaurant located at 1200 East 71st Street. Officer Brown was conversing with the bartender, Hershell Spencer, age 62 of 6034 South Prairie Avenue. A man entered the tavern and asked the bartender for a sandwich in which Spencer replied that the kitchen was closed. The man then asked if he could use the washroom and Spencer pointed the way. Officer Brown and Spencer continued their conversation as the man walked toward the washroom. Suddenly, without warning the man turned around with a gun in his hand and announced a holdup. The robber ordered the patrons to place their hands on the bar. Although Officer Brown was armed he chose not to use his weapon but instead attempted to disarm the gunman by attempting to flip the robber over his shoulder. But due to the height of the robber, Officer Brown was able to do so. Officer Brown then attempted to disarm the robber and was shot at point blank range ten times. The bullets striking him in the head chest both arms and back. Mortally wounded, Officer Brown was able to draw his weapon and fire three rounds before his revolver jammed. When the shooting started, Mr. Spencer jumped over the bar and ducked down. Once the shooting stoped Mr. Spencer stood up to see what happend. Seeing Mr. Spencer the lookout, standing by the tavern's door, fired twice and struck Spencer in the right side of his chest and nose. The gunmen then fled the tavern with no proceeds. Officer Brown was transported to Jackson Park Hospital by beat 371 where he was pronounced dead on arrival by Dr. Bello at 12:15 a.m. on June 3, 1970. Mr. Spencer was transported to Billings Hospital by beat 322, was treated, released and made a full recovery.

The three gunmen escaped and it was believed that Officer Brown had struck one of the gunmen. Several persons of interest were interviewed, but the offenders remain unidentified. They were described as male blacks in their early 20's.

Officer Brown was waked at A. R. Leak Funeral Home located at 7838 South Cottage Grove Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 8, 1970 in Lincoln Cemetery, 12300 South Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Melvin E. Brown, born February 13, 1940, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on June 27, 1966.

Officer Brown was survived by his wife, Albertyne P. (nee Smith); daughter, Lezah; mother, Velma (nee Edmonds) and step-father, Robert.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #J220600.

Patrolman Jay F. Brunkella

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
26 Aug 1968
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3429
Incident Date:
22 Sep 1986
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Friendly (Accidental)
Age:
39
End of Watch:
04 Oct 1986
Unit of Assignment:
24th District - Rogers Park
Date of Birth:
20 Dec 1946
Served:
18 years, 1 month, 8 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
024 - Rogers Park

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Rosehill Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 3, Line 42
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 9-E: 10

Incident Details:

Patrolman Jay F. Brunkella, Star #3429, aged 39 years, was an 18 year, 1 month, 8 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 24th District - Rogers Park Tactical Unit.

On September 22, 1986, at 2:15 p.m., Officer Brunkella and his partner, Patrolman Fred Hattenberger, were working beat 2462C in plainclothes. The officers along with beat 2462D were conducting surveillance at the Stephen F. Gale Elementary School at 1631 W. Jonquil Terrace after receiving complaints of drug sales. The officers observed Allison Jenkins, age 28, of 1626 West Juneway Terrace, make two drug deals in front of the School from a potato chip bag. Jenkins then hid the chip bag on school property. Officer Brunkella went to recover the chip bag as Officer Hattenberger approached Jenkins. Jenkins, seeing the officer approaching, fled westbound on Jonquil Terrace on foot and after a short foot chase, approximately 40 feet, Officer Hattenberger caught up with Jenkins. Jenkins suddenly stopped and turned on Officer Hattenberger. Officer Hattenberger then cocked his revolver and approached Jenkins. During this time Officer Brunkella had been running parallel to the chase in an attempt to cut off Jenkins. Officer Hattenberger with his gun in the right hand grabbed Jenkins with his left hand. A struggle ensued and Jenkins struck Officer Hattenberger in an attempt to flee again. Jenkins became more violent in an attempt to break free at which time Officer hattenberger grabbed Jenkins around the waist with his right hand, all the while still holding his revolver. They both fell to the ground and Officer Hattenberg's gun discharged, the bullet striking Brunkella in the chest, passing through his left lung, as he was running up to assist. Jenkins continued to resist but was placed in custody shortly thereafter. Officer Brunkella was rushed to St. Francis Hospital in a squad car. On September 23, 1986, at 12:00 p.m., Officer Brunkella was transferred to Lutheran General Hospital for treatment in a hyperbaric chamber. Officer Brunkella sustained a single gunshot wound to the chest, the bullet of which passed through his left lung and then transected his spnal cord. He became comatose and it was learned he had lost all brain function and his life support was terminated. Officer Brunkella passed away at 7:38 p.m. on October 4, 1986. The potato chip bag was recovered and contained an amount of cannabis.

Allison Jenkins was arrested and charged with aggravated battery of a police officer, possession of marijuana and resisting arrest. Bail was set at $15,000. Jenkins was later charged with murder and on October 2, 1987 was found guilty in a jury trial. Jenkins lawyer filed a motion for a new trial based on new evidence after the first trial. It was alleged that Officer Hattenberg struck Jenkins across the back while holding his revolver causing it to go off rather than Jenkins striking Officer Hattenberg's arm causing the revolver to go off. On November 13, 1987, Judge Joseph Urso upheld the verdict and denied Jenkins a new trial. On December 4, 1987, Jenkins was sentenced to the minimum of 20 years in prison by Judge Joseph Urso.

Officer Brunkella was waked at a Adinamis Rosehil Blake-Lamb Funeral Home located at 4700 North Western Avenue, his funeral mass was also held at Adinamis Funeral Home and he was laid to rest on October 7, 1986 in Rosehill Cemetery, 5800 North Ravenswood Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Jay F. Brunkella, born December 20, 1946, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on August 26, 1968. He earned 2 Department Commendations, 2 Unit Meritorious Performance Awards, 22 Honorable Mentions and 5 Complimentary Letters during his career.

Officer Brunkella was a member of the Fraternal Order of Police. He was survived by his wife, Carol (nee Smith); daughter, Tyler, age 15; mother, Shirley (nee Weaver) and a brother, Gary.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department RD #H424285.

On October 30, 1987, Officer Brunkella's star was retired by Superintendent Fred Rice and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 1121 South State Street. In 2000, Chicago Police Headquarters moved to a new facility at 3510 South Michigan Avenue, Officer Brunkella's Star was re-encased in the new headquarters building lobby.

Patrolman William McKinley Buck

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
08 May 1924
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
28 Nov 1941
Cause of Death:
Crash - Automobile
Age:
42
End of Watch:
29 Nov 1941
Unit of Assignment:
32nd District - Shakespeare
Date of Birth:
01 Nov 1899
Served:
17 years, 6 months, 20 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
014 - Shakespeare

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Acacia Park Cemetery - Norridge, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # D-10
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 13
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Patrolman William McKinley Buck, Star # Unknown, aged 42 years, was a 17 year, 6 month, 20 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 32nd District - Shakespeare.

On November 28, 1941, Officer Buck and his partner, Patrolman Benjamin Smith, were working the first watch on routine patrol. As the officers approached the intersection of Cortland Street and California Avenue, their patrol car was struck by another vehicle being driven by Frank Corso, age 25. Officer Smith suffered minor injuries. Officer Buck was transported to St. Elizabeth's Hospital where he was placed into an induced coma due to severe brain injury sustained during the crash. Buck died the next day from his injuries on November 29, 1941.

According to court records, Corso had been fined three times in the past year on speeding charges. On January 13, 2008, Corso died in Villa Park, Illinois at the age of 93.

Officer Buck was waked at a chapel located at 4335 West Armitage Avenue, his funeral was also held at the chapel and he was laid to rest on December 2, 1941 in Acacia Park Cemetery, 7800 West Irving Park Road, Norridge, Illinois.

Patrolman William McKinley Buck, born November 1, 1899, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 8, 1924. He earned 2 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer Buck was a member of Chicago Police Post No. 207 American Legion. He was survived by his wife, Dorothy Hazel (nee Leimann); son, William; parents: Margaret and siblings: Christine Stark, Grace Connolly, Hannah Mueller, Lester, Pearl Gross, Walter and the late Otto. He was preceded in death by his daughter Marjorie Jane.

On July 17, 2018, Officer Buck's star was retired by Superintendent of Police Eddie T. Johnson and enshrined in the Superintendent's Honored Star Case, located in the lobby at Chicago Police Headquarters, 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman Peter R. Bulfin

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
09 Jan 1912
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1746
Incident Date:
13 Jul 1917
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
41
End of Watch:
13 Jul 1917
Unit of Assignment:
District 13, 17th Precinct - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
24 Aug 1877
Served:
5 years, 6 months, 4 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
007 - Englewood

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-4
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 51
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 16-E: 6

Incident Details:

Patrolman Peter R. Bulfin, Star #1746, aged 41 years, was a 5 year, 6 month, 4 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 13, 17th Precinct - Maxwell.

On July 13, 1917, at 9:20 a.m., Officer Bulfin was on duty and escorting two clerks from Chicago City Bank & Trust located at 6233 South Halsted Street. The bank was transferring bags of money from the bank to the Live Stock Exchange for deposit. As the auto sat in front of the bank, the bank manager, Edward Wyatt, and two clerks carried out several bags of coin amounting to $12,000.00 and put them into a strong box inside the car. Mr. Wyatt then got into the car behind the wheel while Officer Bulfin sat in the passenger seat. At the same time, four young men, all armed, came from around the corner and advanced on the auto. The gunman caught the two by surprise and as Officer Bulfin attempted to draw his weapon, one of the bandits placed their gun against his chest and fired. Officer Bulfin was stuck in his chest with the bullet penetrating his heart and collapsed in his seat. Mr. Wyatt threw his hands in the air and slumped down in his seat. A different gunmen reached into the money box and seized a bag.

Meanwhile, several patrons and bank employees inside became aware of what was taking place. A cashier, E. H. Holtorff grabbed a revolver and in his fear of striking Mr. Wyatt fired four rounds into the ceiling. The bandits fled up an alley with one bag containing $100.00 in nickels. Once in the alley, a truck driver blocked the bandits escape route, but quickly moved as the four bandits pointed their revolvers at him. They ran to an awaiting touring car with its engine running. The car sped off and made good its escape.

Patrolmen and Detectives responded to the scene and an attempt to transport Bulfin to a hospital was attempted, however he died on scene before he could be transported. Shortly after the shooting, the bank received a phone call. A female bank employee answered and a mans voice asked, “Did that policeman die?” She replied in the affirmative and the man said, “Good” and hung up. The caller was believed to be one of the gunmen. Several clews were investigated and several people were placed under surveillance. Two labor agents with the Motion Picture Operators’ Union No. 110 were held in connection with the robbery. The men were Thomas Malloy and Frank J. Brown of 4205 South Vincennes Avenue. A search conducted by Captain Ryan for the fleeing vehicle produced a lead. The Captain announced later the same night that he had conclusive evidence that the car used belonged to Malloy.

The assailants were unknown and are still at large as of January 1918. Another man, Jack King was also arrested in connection with the robbery, but was later released. On January 11, 1922, Edward J. Daley was arrested as an accessory to murder in the case. On November 23, 1922, Daley's case was Dismissed with prejudice by Judge Haas.

Officer Bulfin was laid to rest on August 16, 1917 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Peter R. Bulfin, born August 24, 1877, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on January 9, 1912. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Bulfin was survived by his wife, Mary and children: Margaret and six others. He was preceded in death by two children.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3065.

Patrolman William Frank Bunda

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
02 May 1922
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
3848
Incident Date:
31 Mar 1924
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
29
End of Watch:
07 Apr 1924
Unit of Assignment:
District 16 - Maxwell
Date of Birth:
16 Apr 1894
Served:
1 year, 11 months, 5 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
012 - Near West

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery - Niles, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-8
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 9
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 10
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 17-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman William Frank Bunda, Star #3848, aged 29 years, was a 1 year, 11 month, 5 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 16 - Maxwell.

On March 31, 1924, at 9:55 p.m., Officer Bunda was on patrol and observed a citizen being chased out of an alley by three Italian men, John Pettitto, John Simonetti, and James Vitaliano. He stopped the men on the Southeast corner of Miller and Polk Streets. As he attempted to search them for concealed weapons, one assailant drew a revolver and fired. Officer Bunda was struck and returned fire, wounding Vitaliano incapacitating him. Officer Bunda, mortally wounded, was then able to detain the other two suspects until backup arrived. Bunda was then rushed to Cook County Hospital where he succumbed to his wounds seven days later on April 7, 1924. Vitaliano was taken to the Bridewell Hospital where he was treated and recovered.

On April 15, 1924, John Pettitto, John Simonetti, and James Vitaliano were held by the Coroner. On May 15, 1924, the Grand Jury returned No Bills on Simonetti and Vitaliano while a True Bill was returned on Pettitto. On November 26, 1924, Pettitto was acquitted by Judge Lynch.

Officer Bunda was laid to rest in St. Adalbert Catholic Cemetery, 6800 North Milwaukee Avenue, Niles, Illinois.

Patrolman William Frank Bunda, born April 16, 1894, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on May 2, 1922.

Officer Bunda was survived by his wife and child.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5796 and Case #7469.

Park Policeman Albert Milroy Burgerson

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
221
Incident Date:
07 Dec 1924
Cause of Death:
Aggravated Battery - Blunt Trauma
Age:
29
End of Watch:
07 Dec 1924
Unit of Assignment:
Unit of Assignment Unknown
Date of Birth:
1895
Served:
Length of Service Unknown
District of Incident (Present Day):
Lincolnwood, IL

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Graceland Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Albert Milroy Burgerson, Star 221, aged 29 years, was a veteran of the South Park Police Department, unit of assignment unknown.

On December 7, 1924, at 3:15 a.m., Officer Burgerson, was off duty and out with friends at the “R” House tavern on Lincoln Avenue two blocks north of Crawford Avenue. He went to answer a call for help from Miss Betty von Gelsen, age 32. The woman was in an auto with six men being attacked. Officer Burgerson attempted to intervene and a melee ensued at the roadhouse. Some of the events that follow are unclear and it is not known if Patrick Keefe was in the vehicle at the time Officer Burgerson intervened or approached from somewhere else. However, Officer Burgerson was punched in the face by Keefe causing him to fall to the ground. Officer Burgerson sustained a broken jaw from the punch. It was also believed by physicians that once he lay on the ground he was kicked in the head, possibly by Keefe, causing his neck to break. Another citizen, Edward Engelkrout of 1928 West Berenice Avenue, was also injured in the melee. Patrick Keefe then fled the scene in his auto and was chased down by Officer Burgerson's friends who were able to apprehend him.

After Officer Burgerson was involved in the fight, his brother-in-law, a Cook County Deputy Sheriff, Frank J. Murray, admitted he had shoved Burgerson’s body into a ditch beside the road because he could not drive his car past him. Murray said he then drove his wife and daughter to their home at 4712 North Leamington Avenue. It is not clear from records whether Officer Burgerson was dead at the time this occurred, but he died as a result of the injuries he sustained in the melee.

On December 8, 1924, Patrick Keefe was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner for manslaughter along with John Mueller and Frank Murry who were held as accessories. On March 26, 1925, all three men were acquitted.

Officer Burgerson was waked at his residence located at 1806 West Bryn Mawr Avenue, his funeral mass was held at Graceland Cemetery Chapel located at 3419 North Clark Street and he was laid to rest on December 10, 1924 in Graceland Cemetery, 4001 North Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Park Policeman Albert Milroy Burgerson was born in 1895.

Officer Burgerson was a Master Mason and a member of North Shore Lodge No. 830 AF&AM. He was survived by his parents: Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Burgeson and siblings: Arthur E, Eric C., Beada and Ruth C.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5839.

The South Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park district police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the South Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Patrolman John C. Burke

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
19 Apr 1912
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1287
Incident Date:
16 Dec 1915
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
28
End of Watch:
16 Dec 1915
Unit of Assignment:
District 6, 11th Precinct - Fiftieth Street
Date of Birth:
22 Dec 1886
Served:
3 years, 7 months, 27 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-3
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 10
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 46
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 9-E: 16

Incident Details:

Patrolman John C. Burke, Star #1287, aged 28 years, was a 3 year, 7 month, 27 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 6, 11th Precinct - Fiftieth Street.

On December 16, 1915, Officer Burke was on patrol when George Dykema, a delivery boy, reported that a 19-year-old delivery boy, Herbert Gergston, was just robbed of $1.40. Dykema described the robber as 5’10” tall, well dressed wearing a dark fedora hat with a round face and pointed in the direction the robber had fled. Officer Burke then set off in search for the robber.

The robber was believed to be the same robber that had been wanted for twenty-five delivery truck robberies. He would usually end up stealing $2.00 to $3.00 and then throw red pepper in his victim’s eyes to prevent them from chasing him. His name was Fred Logue, also known as the “Red Pepper” bandit. He had been terrorizing neighborhoods on the North and South sides for months.

At 5:15 p.m., Officer Burke observed a man matching the description of the robber and he began walking up an alley near Prairie Avenue. As Officer Burke crossed the street in front of 212 East 57th Street to question the subject, the subject fired three shots after spotting him. Officer Burke sustained two gunshot wounds; once in the left arm and once in the chest. The fatal shot struck him just above his police star, bending one of the points, and he died instantly. The suspect then disappeared into an alley and made good his escape. Officer Burke was rushed to Washington Park Hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival.

It was originally believed that the man who murdered Officer Burke was the Red Pepper bandit. However, Fred Logue was later arrested and confessed to all of his crimes but denied killing Officer Burke. Eventually a man by the name of William J. Lyle was arrested in Nashville, Tennessee. A warrant for his arrested had mentioned he used the same tactics as the Red Pepper bandit. Lyle was extradited back to Chicago and was identified by three of his victims as Officer Burke’s killer.

On February 3, 1916, the Coroner was still unable to determine who fired the fatal shot. The gunman is still at large.

Officer Burke was waked at his residence located at 837 West 54th Place, his funeral mass was held at Visitation Catholic Church located at 843 West Garfield Boulevard and he was laid to rest on December 20, 1915 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman John C. Burke, born December 22, 1886, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 19, 1912. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Burke was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and Englewood Council No. 1041 National Union. He was survived by his wife, Rose (nee Flanagan); parents: Margaret (nee Fitzgerald) and Patrick and siblings: Joseph and Norah Griffin.

Ironically, The morning of Officer Burke’s murder he told his wife, “Don’t wait dinner for me, Rose. I’m going to get that red pepper robber and I’ll be late.”

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3022.

Patrolman Burke was involved in another unrelated shootout with his partner, Patrolman James F. Mitchell, who was also killed in the line of duty one month, one day prior on November 15, 1915.

Patrolman Richard J. Burke

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
08 Apr 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
1236
Incident Date:
16 Jun 1919
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
39
End of Watch:
16 Jun 1919
Unit of Assignment:
District 11, 15th Precinct - Thirty-Fifth Street
Date of Birth:
25 Feb 1880
Served:
12 years, 2 months, 9 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 56
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 34-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman Richard J. Burke, Star #1236, aged 39 years, was a 12 year, 2 month, 9 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 11, 15th Precinct - Thirty-Fifth Street, detailed as a Parole Agent.

On June 16, 1919, at 1:35 a.m., Officer Burke entered O’Brien’s Saloon located at 33rd and Halsted Streets. The tavern was open past the legal closing time. He entered and announced that he was closing the establishment. A verbal altercation began resulting in John "Smiling Jack" O'Brien firing several shots at Officer Burke. Officer Burke was struck and mortally wounded. After the shooting the patrons of the tavern dragged Officer Burke’s body and dumped him on the sidewalk outside the tavern. The men then jumped in a taxicab and sped away.

A witness, Miss Harriet Galewski of 749 West 33rd Street, stated that she had gone to her window when she heard the gunshots. She was able to observe three to four men dumping Officer Burke’s body on the sidewalk and speed off in a taxicab. Another on duty Patrolman was stationed nearby and also heard the gunshots. He ran to investigate and observed the taxicab speeding down the street. He fired his service revolver at the vehicle in an effort to force it to stop. The vehicle stopped and he arrested the driver, George Thompson of 635 West Woodland Avenue (present day Grace Street), and six passengers assuming the shooter may be among them. The taxi bore Illinois license number #71436 and was registered to the Emory Motor Livery Company located at 59 East 34th Street. It turned out he was right as John O'Brien and William “James” Kelly were among the six and eventually charged with the murder.

On July 18, 1919, O'Brien was held to the Grand Jury by the Coroner together with William Kelly as an accessory. On December 20, 1919, O'Brien was sentenced to hang on February 20, 1920 by Judge Kersten. On January 9, 1920, the case against Kelly was stricken off the record by Judge Kersten. On February 20, 1920, O'Brien was hanged at the Cook County Jail.

Officer Burke was waked at his residence located at 3331 Union Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 19, 1919 in Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Richard J. Burke, born February 25, 1980, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 8, 1907. He earned 3 Credible Mentions during his career.

Officer Burke was survived by his wife.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3104.

Patrolman Thomas Burke

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
04 Apr 1892
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
2100
Incident Date:
21 Dec 1931
Cause of Death:
Struck - By Vehicle
Age:
70
End of Watch:
21 Dec 1931
Unit of Assignment:
18th District - Stock Yards
Date of Birth:
15 Mar 1861
Served:
39 years, 8 months, 17 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
009 - Deering

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Olivet Catholic Cemetery - Chicago, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 31
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 64-W: 3

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas Burke, Star #2100, aged 70 years, was a 39 year, 8 month, 17 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the 18th District - Stock Yards.

On December 21, 1931, at 5:05 p.m., Officer Burke was on duty and had just "pulled" a patrol box at 47th and Morgan Streets. As he stepped off the curb to cross the street he was struck by a motor truck that was traveling westbound on 47th Street. The accident occurred at dusk and in fog. Officer Burke succumbed to his injuries and died three hours later from a fractured skull.

Officer Burke was laid to rest on December 24, 1931 in Mount Olivet Cemetery, 2755 West 111th Street, Chicago, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas Burke, born March 15, 1861, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on April 4, 1892. He earned 1 Credible Mention during his career.

Officer Burke was survived by his wife, Sarah C. A.

Patrolman Thomas W. Burke

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
23 Nov 1909
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
4986
Incident Date:
16 Jun 1921
Cause of Death:
Crash - Motorcycle (Pursuit)
Age:
39
End of Watch:
17 Jun 1921
Unit of Assignment:
Motorcycle Division
Date of Birth:
24 Jul 1881
Served:
11 years, 6 months, 24 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Calvary Cemetery - Evanston, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 2, Line 5
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 20-E: 7

Incident Details:

Patrolman Thomas W. Burke, Star #4986, aged 39 years, was an 11 year, 6 month, 24 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Motorcycle Division.

On June 16, 1921, Officer Burke was in pursuit of a speeding vehicle on Crawford Avenue (present day Pulaski Road) near Huron Street when he lost control of his police motorcycle after it struck a pothole and it overturned. He was transported to a local hospital where he later succumbed to his injuries on June 17, 1921.

After his death, Officer Burke’s widow spoke out about the deplorable condition of Crawford Avenue (present day Pulaski Road). The road was in such disrepair it had led to the injury of numerous motorcycle cops and ultimately her husband’s death.

Officer Burke was waked at this residence located at 1029 North Central Park Avenue, his funeral mass was held in Requiem at Our Lady of Angels Catholic Church located at 3808 West Iowa Street and he was laid to rest on June 20, 1921 in Calvary Cemetery, 301 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Illinois.

Patrolman Thomas W. Burke, born July 24, 1881, received a Temporary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on February 8, 1907 prior to his Probationary Appointment to the Department on November 23, 1909.

Officer Burke was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association and O'Connor Council No. 687 Knights of Columbus. He was survived by his wife, Jean M.; son, Raymond; father, William and siblings: Mrs. William M. Guerin.

Chicago Police Department homicide file not found for this incident.

Detective Sergeant George C. Burns

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
07 Mar 1907
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
207
Incident Date:
03 Oct 1919
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
38
End of Watch:
03 Oct 1919
Unit of Assignment:
District 15, 20th Precinct - Fillmore
Date of Birth:
03 Feb 1881
Served:
12 years, 6 months, 26 days
District of Incident (Present Day):
011 - Harrison

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
Mount Carmel Cemetery - Hillside, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-5
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 23
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 58
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 19-W: 10

Incident Details:

Detective Sergeant George C. Burns, Star #207, aged 38 years, was a 12 year, 6 month, 26 day veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to District 15, 20th Precinct - Fillmore.

On October 3, 1919, at 12:57 a.m., Detective Sergeant and Detective Sergeant Bernard J. Lenehan were on duty inside Mulhern's Saloon located at 3301 West Madison Street. The two officers were speaking with the bartender, Eugene Morrissey, and had only been inside the saloon for a few minutes when two men entered through a side door. The men came in wearing handkerchiefs over their faces and with their guns drawn. One of the bandits then struck a patron, Vernon Lambert of 2517 South Millard Avenue, on the knee with their gun and ordered him to hold up his hands. This caused Lambert to scream drawing the attention of the officers. They turned to see what the commotion was about and were recognized by the bandits as police. The bandits immediately opened fire as both officers reached for their weapons. Before Sergeant Burns could draw his service revolver he was struck four times in the abdomen and side. He was able to return fire as he ran after one bandit to the rear of the saloon before he slipped out a back door to the alley. Sergeant Lenehan in the meantime struggled with the other bandit and was shot in the forehead, at close range, as he attempted to restrain the robber. Despite being shot in the head, he continued to struggle with the bandit, the fight moving out the side door to the sidewalk. It was here that Sergeant Lenehan fell unconscious from loss of blood. The robbers then fled the scene to a waiting auto occupied a driver and another man. The flivver sped off driving South on Spaulding Avenue then turning west onto Van Buren Street and disappearing. Sergeant Burns was taken to Garfield Park Hospital where he died a half hour after arriving. Sergeant Lenehan was taken to St. Anthony Hospital where he lingered for two days before succumbing to his wounds on October 5, 1919.

Detectives investigating the shooting combed the city for the owner of a hat that was recovered at the scene. The hat had a trademark “Gus the Square Hatter.” In addition to the hat, police recovered a white handkerchief and a.38 caliber blue steel Smith and Wesson revolver, serial #22560, at the scene. The serial number was made public in the hope that a previous owner would step forward and provide a clue as to the owner. Description of the holdup men were also put out as 35 years old, one being about 5’10” tall with dark hair and a smooth face and the other slightly shorter with light brown hair and a clear complexion. A reward of $1,500, collected by fellow detectives was offered for any information leading to the arrest of the bandits.

One of the bandits involved was tentatively identified as John Kristoveck, a left handed shooter, after he shot and killed Sergeant Edward W. Marpool on October 26, 1920. The second gunman remains unknown and is still at large.

Sergeant Burns was waked at his residence located at 3939 West Fillmore Street, his funeral mass was held at Visitation Catholic Church located at 843 West Garfield Boulevard and he was laid to rest on October 6, 1919 in Mount Carmel Cemetery, 1400 South Wolf Road, Hillside, Illinois.

Detective Sergeant George C. Burns, born February 3, 1881, received his Probationary Appointment to the Chicago Police Department on March 7, 1907. He earned 2 Credible Mentions during his career. On November 8, 1913, he was promoted to 2nd Class Detective Sergeant, becoming effective on November 10, 1913 and his title being officially changed by order of the city council on January 11, 1915. Prior to joining the Chicago Police Department he was a City Fireman.

Sergeant Burns was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Mae and children: Edward, Hugh, Katherine, Maria, William and a sixth child.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #3119.

Park Policeman Harry Joseph Busse

Image Not Available
Agency:
Appointed Date:
1918
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
289
Incident Date:
26 Jan 1922
Cause of Death:
Gunfire - Enemy
Age:
30
End of Watch:
27 Jan 1922
Unit of Assignment:
B District
Date of Birth:
14 Sep 1892
Served:
4 years*
District of Incident (Present Day):
002 - Wentworth

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Panel # B-7
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Panel # 11
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Panel # 1, Line 58
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Panel # 22-E: 10

Incident Details:

Park Policeman Harry Joseph Busse, Star #289, aged 30 years, was a 4 year veteran of the South Park Police Department, assigned to the B District.

On January 26, 1922, Officer Busse attempted to take action, off duty, as he was approached by two armed robbers, Frank Lee, age 16, and Charles Shader, age 19, at Garfield Boulevard and Federal Street. Officer Busse was walking east on Garfield Boulevard at the time and a half a block ahead of him were Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Shoger. The robbers approached him and as he drew his gun he was shot in the face by Shader and fatally wounded. Officer Busse was unconscious when help reached him. He was transported to German Deaconess Hospital. Physicians said his death would come in a matter of hours and he had not regained consciousness by midnight. He died from his wounds the following day on January 27, 1922.

Lee and Shader were eventually arrested. Charles Shader, during questioning, admitted to police that he shot Policeman Busse. His mother was also arrested when it was discovered that she had directed her son and his accomplice in more than 200 robberies and other crimes. It was also discovered that he had recently been freed for killing his father, after testifying that he did so to protect his mother. Later Shader’s sister shot and killed herself, but after his arrest he told police that his mother killed her when she refused to participate in their life of crime.

On September 13, 1922, Frank Lee and Chase Shader were convicted of first degree murder and sentenced to life in the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. On May 5, 1926, Chase Shader was part of a prison break that took the life of Illinois Department of Corrections Deputy Warden Peter Klein who was stabbed and beaten to death with a knife and scissors. Coincidentally he broke out with another inmate, Charles “Slim” Duschkowski, who was also sentenced to life for the murder of Sergeant Terrence Lyons of the West Park Police Department on May 10, 1922. He enjoyed his freedom for only a short time before being caught. He along with the five other escapees was sentenced to death for Warden Klein's murder. On March 12, 1927, Shader and five other inmates staged a daring escape, the second for Shader, from the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet. He was one of three suspects subdued by guards while the other three escaped. He escaped again in June of 1927 and was recaptured by an off duty Chicago Policeman a year later. On October 10, 1928, he earned the dubious honor of being the last person to be hanged in Illinois.

Officer Busse’s funeral was held in Requiem at St. Martin Catholic Church located at 5842 South Princeton Avenue and he was laid to rest on January 30, 1922 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois.

Park Policeman Harry Joseph Busse, born September 14, 1892, received his Probationary Appointment to the South Park Police Department in 1918.

Officer Busse Served in the U.S. Army, was a veteran of World War I and was Honorably Discharged. He was survived by his fiancée, Nelle; mother, Elizabeth (nee Reiff); brother, William and sister.

Incident Recorded under Chicago Police Department homicide file, Case #5718.

The South Park Police Department, in the City of Chicago, was disbanded on April 30, 1934. On May 1, 1934, the remaining officers were transferred to the Chicago Park District Police Department, which was organized on the same date. Three park district police departments, Lincoln, West, and South were consolidated into the Chicago Park District Police Department. Fallen officers of the South Park Police Department are currently honored on the memorial wall of the Chicago Police Department as Chicago Police Officers. Their stars are displayed in the Honored Star Case located in the lobby of the Chicago Police Department at 3510 South Michigan Avenue.

Detective Francis “Frank” Anthony Byrnes

Image Not Available
Agency:
Chicago Police Department
Appointed Date:
Unknown
Death Classification:
Line of Duty Death
Star #:
Unknown
Incident Date:
25 May 1945
Cause of Death:
Drowned
Age:
43
End of Watch:
25 May 1945
Unit of Assignment:
Detective Bureau
Date of Birth:
13 May 1902
Served:
District of Incident (Present Day):
004 - South Chicago

Memorial Details:

Cemetery:
St. Mary Catholic Cemetery - Evergreen Park, Illinois
Superintendent's Honored Star Case:
Not Enshrined
Gold Star Families Memorial:
Not Listed
Illinois Police Officers Memorial:
Not Listed
National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial:
Not Listed

Incident Details:

Detective Francis “Frank” Anthony Byrnes, Star # Unknown, aged 43 years, was a veteran of the Chicago Police Department, assigned to the Detective Bureau, Homicide Detail.

On May 25, 1945, Detective Byrnes was off duty while fishing in Lake Michigan off of 78th Street. He was in the company of retired Captain August Borda, age 60, of the Chicago Fire Department. While fishing their boat capsized. Borda, unable to swim, clung to the side of the capsized boat. Detective Byrnes attempted to swim to the breakwater in an effort to get help for Borda. As he attempted to swim to the breakwater he was overcome and drowned. Borda was later rescued. Detective Byrnes’ Body was recovered from Lake Michigan on June 12, 1945.

A Coroner’s Inquest was held and on June 13, 1945 Detective Byrnes’ death was ruled accidental.

On February 18, 1949, Judge Joseph Graber of the Superior Court award the widow of Detective Byrnes a full widow’s pension. The pension board was required to pay Mrs. Byrnes $125.00 monthly instead of the previous $24.00 per month annuity. The death of Detective Byrnes was ruled in the line of duty by Judge Graber and therefore ruled the widow was entitled to the $125.00 a month paid to widows of policemen killed in the line of duty. The ruling was made retroactive and Mrs. Byrnes received an additional $4,444.00 in retro pay.

Detective Byrnes was waked in a funeral home located at 79th Street and Phillips Avenue, his funeral mass was held at St. Brides Church located at 7811 South Coles Avenue and he was laid to rest on June 14, 1945 in St. Mary Catholic Cemetery, 3801 West 87th Street, Evergreen Park, Illinois. His grave is located in Section G, Lot 2 SW GRS X81.

Detective Francis “Frank” Anthony Byrnes was born on May 13, 1902.

Detective Byrnes was a member of the Chicago Policemen's Benevolent & Welfare Association. He was survived by his wife, Florence (Erich); son, Robert Francis; mother, Ellen (nee Kanneally) and siblings: Arthur, Florence M. and Mrs. Edward Hansen.